541 results for Unclassified

  • Culture-Centered Method: The nuts and bolts of co-creating communication infrastructures of listening in communities

    Dutta, M; Thaker, JJ (2016)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

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  • I am not the problem : challenging deficit narratives of indigenous development through alternative media : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Stillwell, Laura (2016)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    The aim of this research was to explore the extent to which alternative media sources challenge normative representations of Indigenous peoples and provide an opportunity for alternate representations, specifically expressions of agency and empowerment. Mainstream media oversimplifies Indigenous development goals and relies heavily upon stereotypes and problematising discourses. Critical analysis of alternative news articles show that alternative media represents issues related to Indigenous development from a collective perspective, demonstrating a strong presence of solidarity. Contestation of problematising discourses is commonly situated in a context of colonisation and ongoing marginalisation and through this narrative stories of agency and empowerment are shared. Overwhelmingly, there was evidence that Indigenous development was not being undertaken in a participatory approach, the state failing to consult and instead enforcing paternalistic and punitive policies specifically targeting Indigenous communities. A key finding of this research is that alternative media provides a voice for those silenced by state processes and policies, disseminating urgent calls for community-based engagement and recognition of the ongoing impacts of colonisation for Indigenous development.

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  • Walking with broken crutches : exploring the effects of host-state fragility upon refugees : a research project presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Foreman, Mark (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This research report explores the relationship between state fragility and the hosting of refugees in the context of the protracted Afghan refugee crisis, where fragile state Pakistan hosts Afghan refugees. The reality for the majority of the world’s refugees is that their hosts are neighbouring countries which are in varying conditions of state fragility. Some states are bearing the brunt of the global refugee burden despite their general struggle to provide basic services and livelihood opportunities for their own citizens. For these ‘fragile hosts’, providing for an influx of refugees would be untenable without significant international assistance. Following a comprehensive literature review looking at the complex interplay between conflict, state fragility, underdevelopment and forced migration, the report case study is prefaced by background chapters surveying the factors which triggered Afghan forced migration, and Pakistan’s fragile status as host respectively. This report then offers an analysis of two region-specific UNHCR documents which explores the relationship between Afghan refugees and Pakistan as ‘fragile host’. Various host-state incapacities were found to entrench endemic poverty and insecurity in the Afghan refugee population in Balochistan due to a lack of livelihood opportunities, and availability and access to quality services. These issues have also created barriers to local refugee integration, and the fluctuating interest of international donors has historically served to exacerbate these challenges. This report argues that a much-improved understanding of the multi-layered and complex regional, national and local relationships between protracted conflict, state fragility and refugee-host dynamics is needed in order to approach a sustainable solution.

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  • Sustainable development : a model Indonesian SRI co-operative : this research paper is presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, Massey University, New Zealand

    Sharp, Gawain (2016)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    This research report explores how ‘sustainable livelihoods’ have been achieved at a model cooperative using the ‘System of Rice Intensification’ named SIMPATIK. To conduct the research a novel template was developed. The framework was required following a review of sustainable livelihood literature which found deficiencies with the ‘sustainable livelihoods framework’, particularly its treatment of equity, social capital, culture and agro-ecology which disqualified the framework as an appropriate approach for the research. Amekawa’s (2011) ‘Integrated Sustainable Livelihoods Framework’ which synthesises agro-ecology and the sustainable livelihoods framework is then discussed. Further work is then presented on social capital which this paper argues has a critical role in facilitating access to livelihood capitals. A discussion of the significance of culture then follows to underline its importance as a form of livelihood capital. The research then introduces an operational model that is appropriate to the local cultural, institutional and geographical context to demonstrate how livelihood capitals are linked to livelihood outcomes, a model I have labelled the ‘Apt-Integrated Sustainable Livelihoods Framework’. This framework is then informed through field research at the SIMPATIK co-operative. Impact pathways through ‘synergetic forms of social capital’ and the System of Rice Intensification (SRI) are shown indeed to lead to sustainable livelihood outcomes for research participants. The ‘sequencing’ of livelihood capitals is seen to be critical and the research culminates in the development of a ‘SRI Co-operative Template for Sustainable Livelihoods’; a transferable model that shows how SRI can be promoted as a sustainable livelihood strategy.

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  • A comparison of New Zealand police officers' perceptions of development practice within New Zealand development programmes : a research paper presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development, School of People, Environment and Planning, Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Brennan, Kevin J (2015)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    From the 1990s onwards, the New Zealand Police followed a global trend of progressively becoming involved in overseas peacekeeping and development deployments that over time changed from operational interventions to deployments that were more developmental in nature. While development concepts within these New Zealand Police development interventions have been committed to in principal, there has been little or no research undertaken as to how New Zealand police perceive and undertake their roles within these interventions. Using a post-development framework this research explores how these development interventions and the subsequent expectations for the role of the New Zealand police officer during development interventions overseas were created. A survey and interviews were conducted with a small number of New Zealand police officers who have deployed within these interventions to identify their perceptions of development practice so as to compare with the expectations of the development programmes. My research predominantly finds that New Zealand police officers place a high value on their prior New Zealand policing experiences. In implementing development programmes there was an overwhelming recognition by the research participants for the need to form positive relationships by listening and acknowledging another’s culture. This recognition of the benefits of positive working relationships has led this research to conclude that a recognition of the importance of the personal agency of New Zealand police officers could contribute to recognise and support the personal agency of their development partner to achieve realistic and desirable development outcomes for the intended beneficiary, provided programme design is constructed to incorporate this approach.

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  • Involving young men in preventing violence against women : a case study of Instituto Promundo's Program H : a research report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of International Development at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Rose, Courtney-Jane (2016)

    Unclassified
    Massey University

    Intimate partner violence among youth is recognised as a public health concern, an obstacle to economic development, and a gross violation of human rights. This research found that intimate partner violence against women is closely linked to inequitable gender attitudes. In order to combat violence related to these gender attitudes, prevention interventions have particularly targeted young men in recent years. However, in aiming to solve this issue, violence prevention has often heavily focused on reducing the risk of negative behaviour, rather than positively empowering youth participation and growth. Approaches that instead view youth as resources to be developed, rather than simply as risks to society, are recommended. This research is focusing specifically on Instituto Promundo as an example of an organisation that seeks to fulfil youth rights in practice and improve youth behaviour and attitudes relating to gender within the Brazilian context. Promundo’s ‘Program H’ works to empower young men to rewrite harmful traditional masculinities and ultimately prevent violence through engagement in both individual and community activities. This report utilised a Positive Youth Development framework to investigate Program H, and found that the initiative has the potential to simultaneously prevent the risk of violence while also promoting positive youth behaviour. Program H significantly contributes to changing inequitable gender norms amongst young men, with potential positive and empowering flow-on effects to the young people of Brazil and the wider Latin American region.

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  • Destratification – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    During summer, the surface waters of lakes warm and become less dense than the colder bottom waters. This process is known as stratification and prevents surface and bottom water mixing. Stratification can occur intermittently in shallower lakes or for up to 9 months in deeper lakes (Figure 1). Under natural conditions stratification normally breaks down during the winter months when surface temperatures equilibrate with the bottom of the lake.

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  • Exclusion and removal of pest fish from Lake Ohinewai – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Ling, Nicholas; Daniel, Adam Joshua (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Many of the shallow lakes in the lower Waikato River floodplain have significantly degraded water quality as a result of nutrient and sediment enrichment from non-point sources. Pest fish species such as koi carp, goldfish, and catfish have exacerbated lake decline by resuspending lake sediments and uprooting submerged macrophytes. This this resulted in a collapse of submerged macrophytes and progression from clear-water oligotrophic state to a eutrophic (algal-dominated) state.

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  • Legal status of Rudd, Catfish, Goldfish – fact sheet

    Collier, Kevin J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 species (equivalent to 38% of all freshwater fish species) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Pest Fish Control - Fact Sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Collier, Kevin J.; Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Due to their negative impacts on water quality and native biodiversity in New Zealand, regional councils have included a number of introduced freshwater fish species such as koi carp, rudd, brown bullhead catfish, goldfish, tench, gambusia (mosquitofish) and European perch (Figure 1) in their pest management plans. The Department of Conservation and regional councils undertake control and eradication programmes around New Zealand every year in order to contain their spread and reduce their impacts. Nearly all regions of mainland New Zealand have at least one of these species but they are most prevalent in the Auckland and Waikato regions. LERNZ has been researching the population ecology and capture methods of pest fish populations in order to develop efficient methods for their control.

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  • New Zealand pest fish species: Koi carp and Gambusia – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    New Zealand has a total of about 36 native freshwater fish species, and a further 22 (39% of all freshwater fish) have been introduced from overseas. Like all introduced species, they have some impact on New Zealand's native ecosystems, but some cause more problems than others.

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  • Flocculation and sediment capping – fact sheet

    Tempero, Grant Wayne; Paul, Wendy J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Sediment capping and flocculation are in-lake techniques designed to reduce internal nutrient loads from the bottom sediments of lakes. These loads are roughly equivalent in magnitude to external loads. Case studies of the Rotorua lakes (Figure 1) show that with careful design and management, sediment capping and flocculation can reduce nutrient concentrations and the likelihood of algal blooms. Relevant actions can include: (i) reducing bioavailable phosphorus in stream inflows through continuous addition of the active material to the stream, (ii) removing bioavailable phosphorus, and flocculation and sedimentation of nutrients, and (iii) altering sediment composition so that nutrients are more efficiently retained within the bottom sediments

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  • LERNZdb Freshwater Database – fact sheet

    Parshotam, A. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    The LERNZdb Freshwater Database is a repository for freshwater quality data and biodiversity measurement data for lakes, rivers and wetlands in New Zealand. It was developed as part of the Lake Ecosystem Restoration New Zealand (LERNZ: LERNZ.co.nz) programme in co-operation between the Information & Technology Services Division (ITS) and LERNZ researchers at the University of Waikato. LERNZdb has the ability to store a wide variety of freshwater data in a consistent format, it also scores the quality of the data based on the provided quality controlled information. This allows the user to filter data based on the standard of data collection and encourages the provision of high quality data for use in modelling applications.

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  • Invasive fish and nutrients – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Invasive fish such as koi (or common) carp (Cyprinus carpio) are large fish as adults (typically 1-3 kg) and can exist at high biomass (commonly 1000-2000 kg/ha). Because of their large size, high biomass, and suctorial feeding behaviour that disturbs the lake bed, koi carp have the potential to contribute a significant amount of plant nutrients (nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) to lake waters. To estimate the potential of koi carp to inhibit lake restoration, we estimated the rates of excretion relative to other processes contributing nutrients to lakes.

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  • Remote sensing of water quality – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J.; Allan, Mathew Grant (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Evaluating water quality is a key tool in lake management. Typically water quality samples are restricted to a limited number of point samples collected in situ in the field, which can be time consuming and costly. Also, the few in situ points sampled fail to capture the spatial variability, e.g., for the large Lake Waikare (3,400 ha; Figure. 1).

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  • Whole-lake fish removal – fact sheet

    Hicks, Brendan J. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    A central objective of our lake restoration research was to remove invasive fish from 5 lakes of >5 ha in area to restore indigenous biodiversity. We chose a variety of lakes with dominant invasive fish species ranging from goldfish to perch and koi carp (Figure 1 and Table 1). Because of the priority accorded to Lower Karori Reservoir by end users we relaxed the original criterion of> 5 ha lake area. We fished with a variety of fishing methods (boat electrofish ing, fyke and seine netting, and feeder (pod) trapping).

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  • Effects of introduced fish on zooplankton – fact sheet

    Duggan, Ian C. (2015)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    Zooplankton are small animals that feed on algae and bacteria in lakes, and are in turn food for small fish. Three major zooplankton groups exist in lakes; the cladocerans and copepods, which are both small crustaceans, and the rotifers (Figure 1). Like other animals, many zooplankton species have naturally distinct geographies, meaning New Zealand has species that are not known from other parts of the world. Many zooplankton species are sensitive to changes in water quality and fish introductions.

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  • The old North Shore. A heritage walkway: Rahopara Pa to Campbells Bay beach

    Woodruffe, Paul; Henderson, Ian; Corbet, Rob (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    There are many interesting heritage sites and buildings within what used to be called North Shore City, most of these are protected, documented, valued by the local residents and enjoyed as a destination by visitors. What this exhibition explores are four significant sites that lay just beyond the better known and documented sites of Devonport, Takapuna and Northcote. These sites are situated in Castor Bay and Campbells Bay, and are within easy walking distance from each other. The sites vary in origin from an 17th century Maori settlement, to a 21st century environmental restoration project. All the sites except one have been researched and documented to varying degrees, the one site that was not; Memorial Avenue in Centennial Park, lay neglected by the city authorities for decades until 2009 when the Takapuna Community Board commissioned the everyday collective to undertake a site analysis, this resulted in a heritage classification for the avenue being established within the new management plan for the park. This document puts forward a proposition that links all four sites together as a heritage walkway connecting to the existing NZ Coastal Walkway system that runs along the eastern bays coastline. All these sites contain, or lay adjacent to, valuable architectural or landscape features that contain important stories from the past, stories that share common ground in the rich tapestry of the old north shore.

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  • Development of a calibrated numerical computer model of the Raglan coast, bar and harbour

    Phillips, David (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Teaching narrative counselling as a transformative practice: A pilot study investigating whether student learning is akin to client experiences

    Lewis, Dorothea; Gremillion, Helen; Cheshire, Aileen (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aims and objectives of this pilot project are to 1) develop best practices in the teaching of narrative work; 2) provide a unique and powerful lens for understanding the effectiveness of narrative therapy; and 3) identify intersections between teaching and professional practice in this field. Students in the 2009 PGDip Counselling course at Unitec were interviewed about their positive learning experiences to determine whether these experiences are akin to extant client accounts of successful therapeutic work. Similarities between these two sets of experiences would allow research on teaching practice in this field to inform understandings of effective narrative work. The researchers found that there are indeed significant similarities between these two sets of experiences. Specifically both the teaching and the practicing of successful narrative ideas entail 1) decentring “expert” knowledge; 2) centering the agency of learners (students and clients); and 3) the creation of reflective, interactive, and dialogical space. Positioning theory has emerged as a useful set of ideas for capturing these conclusions, which speak to aim/objectives #2 and #3. Aim/objective 1 will follow from publication and further research.

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