541 results for Unclassified

  • Network, interactive wind generation – Mairaki Downs, Rangiora

    Leaver, Jonathan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • An investigation into the success of in-clinic animal behaviour therapy

    Dale, Arnja (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Landscape for life - An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Living roofs offer an opportunity to bring conservation into a contemporary context integrated within urban landscapes. Once neglected and under-utilized roof landscapes can now become biodiverse enclaves of indigenous flora and fauna. The microhabitat variables required for lizards, including temperature, humidity, refuge/shelter and prey, on New Zealand’s first fully indigenous extensive living roof have been studied over three years. Temperature and humidity data from a known lizard site has been used to assess the suitability of the living roof in conjunction with a comparison of insects monitored on the living roof and a literature review of lizard diet. This data has provided the research team (an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, landscape architects and product designers) with the parameters needed to develop, prototype and field-test a prosthetic habitat that provides enhanced conditions on the living roof for lizards. Results from stage 1 indicate a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks. The results of stage 1 have are now providing a solid basis for stage 2 of the research which has met with Department of Conservation approval in principle (meeting held in February), for the progression to a permit for a trial relocation of skinks onto the living roof. Project highlights: Working with product design researchers and students to brainstorm the prosthetic habitat concept. Feedback from International conference which confirmed some of our preliminary results on living roof environmental conditions and emphasised the International relevance of the research. A field visit to Shakespear Regional Park where the prosthetic habitats were put into the field and seeing evidence of lizard use of the habitats.

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  • Home science graduates : Carnegie and beyond

    Collins, Jenny (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Domestics

    Jotti, Dorina (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Highlights • ‘Domestics’ exhibition at Unitec’s Snowwhite Gallery. • Catalogues distributed during the exhibition. • Discussions related to the exhibition theme were a valuable component throughout the time of the exhibition • Interest from other tertiary institutions to exhibit the work. Conclusion Work exhibited and accompanying written material achieved desired dialogues and further encourages ongoing discussions about the role of ‘gendered’ art in contemporary practice.

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  • Breeding biology of laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguinea) in New Zealand

    Perrott, John (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the last year we have identified six nesting areas from which we have collected nest debris and behavioural observations. From this data we have identified all animal remains within the debris. In addition, we identified the New Zealand kookaburra population range margins and distribution. We have tested tracking methods and conducted nest site protection measures at the six breeding sites (e.g., protecting kookaburra nesting sites from possum damage). We have developed and distributed media and public information packs to private land owners north of Auckland and on Kawau Island to gain access to private lands used by kookaburra. To date, we have all the prerequisite information required to apply for additional external research grants and publish one paper on kookaburra nest debris and predation of native species in New Zealand forests.

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  • Reprogramming Sunnynook as an urban transport node

    Kaza, Krystina (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • A more sustainable hull form

    Wilson, Richard; Chiappini, Cristiana; Flitta, Isaac (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of the project was to find a planing powerboat hull form capable of being pushed through the water more easily than existing hull forms and yet which still maintains, or even improves on practical performance factors such as sea keeping ability, stability, and directional stability. The speed most suited to test our hull shape is in the speed range 25 knots and under, a practical range for the general power boating public. There is some education required to have the power boating public understand the economy advantage of not carrying more power/weight than necessary.

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  • The management of transit zone economies: Perceptions and realities

    Simpson, Ken (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • LAB: Research Theatre Company (part two) - Creating a dialogue with the audience

    Ilgenfritz, Pedro (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The research project LAB: Research Theatre Company (part two) - Creating a Dialogue with the Audience was designed to investigate the dramaturgical development of the theatre show Alfonsina (and the theme of immigration) through audience feedback. The show was performed in four different places/contexts and selected audience members were invited to reflect and to express their reading/understanding of plot, theatre language, social and political questions and the philosophy of the company. The research revealed that all focus groups perceived the dialectics of the immigration experience and its contradictions in different degrees. Our goal was to see how this conversation with the audience could become a further step towards the development of the story and the technical side of the performance. In conclusion, the project was successful in achieving the desired result. The script of Alfonsina was adjusted several times as a result of the conversations with the audience; the audience was almost a co-creator in a sense that they were active in participating in the process of developing the show.

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  • Pacific diaspora media pilot project

    Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Modelling and monitoring the Unitec standard house to improve sustainability and indoor environmental quality.

    Tait, Robert (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    A testing facility has been established on the Unitec campus which allows monitoring of temperatures and humidity levels in a standard 3-bedroom house, operating as a control, to compare with the performance a second house modified with alternative materials or construction techniques. This appears to be very rare for thermal testing, with most experiments being carried out at an elemental level (ie individual materials within a laboratory setting), or in situ on a small section of construction as part of a larger building. A pilot study was completed to ensure that the monitoring process was functioning appropriately, and data collection commenced in December of the first test case, investigating the performance of a high-spec glazing unit to replace standard double-glazing. Initial findings indicate that the high-spec glazing makes a significant improvement in the thermal comfort of the house, which confirms results from laboratory-based materials tests. Monitoring is ongoing, and further analysis will provide more detailed evaluation of the benefits provided by the glazing in terms of year-round temperature performance and any resulting energy savings. In parallel with the physical testing of the house performance, computer simulations have been used to model the theoretical performance, and test the accuracy and ease of use of commonly used environmental modeling software. This part of the project has proven more difficult than expected, and has not yet produced results with the desired accuracy to compare against the monitored data. However, the difficulties experienced have provided an insight into potential problems and improvements that need to be addressed before these systems can be used more widely by practitioners.

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  • Digitising the complex form

    Egginton, Zane (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The intention of this project was (and still is) to explore the possibilities of using complex and seemingly organic forms in a typical digital workflow for designers, be they Landscape architects, Architects, sculptors or product designers. This includes the capturing, creation, generation, and visualisation of these forms as well as the potentialities and limitations of different techniques. For the ANZASCA conference I collaborated with two other staff members Nikolay Popov who has an interest in cellular automata and Brett Orams who is has an interest in procedural modelling. Together we wrote a very detailed paper that I presented at the conference. I’m currently looking for other conferences to present more detailed studies of certain aspects of this original paper (which was very well received).

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  • Whaia te iti kahurangi: Efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector: Focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The present study is situated in Unitec Institute of Technology, a dynamic tertiary institution in New Zealand, catering to the needs of a large and diverse student population enrolled in courses ranging from certificate level to doctoral programmes. Annual summative evaluations of achievement of students reveal ethnicity based disparities in the rate of success and retention of undergraduate students, with Pasifika students positioned in the lower levels as compared to mainstream and Maori students in both Unitec campuses. In this research project, the reasons underpinning this disparity is assessed from the context of efficacy and agency of students, two constructs which correlate with academic achievement. Led by a research design underpinned by Kaupapa Maori, Pasifika, mainstream methodologies, and ancient philosophies, the findings are reported mainly from the perspectives of student and parent participants from Pasifika communities. Although an inclusive approach of inviting tertiary students across all ethnicities that had enrolled for a qualification programme to participate was the norm, the central aim was to unravel some of the challenges faced by participants from the Pasifika community which precluded optimal achievement. Unitec Centre for Pacific approved Tertiary Education Commission funding for this research. Pasifika parents with teenagers enrolled in secondary schools or/ and with children in the tertiary sector were also invited to participate in focus groups to share their perspectives on higher education, and how they coped with emerging challenges. A mixed-methods approach was used to assess self-efficacy, agency, and perceptions of success. Findings reveal students in the tertiary sector reporting high levels of efficacy. Agency and perception of success seems to be more collective in nature, with a sense of responsibility towards oneself and one’s family acting as agentic forces to succeed in the tertiary sector. Students are intent upon setting goals, using learning strategies, taking responsibility for their learning and attaining them. Teacher participation in this research was almost non-existent, despite being part of the research design. This was a major limitation of the study, since there is no empirical data on culturally sensitive teaching strategies in use. The findings also capture the critical role of family, teachers, support staff, and peers in student achievement and success in bicultural and multi-cultural tertiary education context.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory: The old North Shore

    Woodruffe, Paul (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The project’s aims were to identify areas and structures of special heritage character on the North Shore of Auckland City, research and document the history of the site(s) identified and establish contacts with the local community, especially the community groups that are involved in the preservation or heritage architecture and landscapes. The approach taken was one of gathering information and photographic images, both archival and commissioned, making contact with stakeholders and producing artworks based on these resources. The most important findings can be grouped into two categories; the first is the discovery that three heritage sites and four heritage buildings can be linked to create a heritage walking trail, that if created would protect the sites and lead to a restoration and design project of regional significance. The second is that any project that is based on an inclusive and consultative program with the local community has to be given a reasonably long timetable, and has to be designed to fit in with local meetings and events. This project is achieving something rather than has achieved something, as it is through necessity ongoing into 2011, but it is successfully establishing a methodology for collaborative inter-disciplinary projects designed to work within communities regarding disputed and neglected sites. It has proven the importance of using a mixture of advocacy and consultation as a precursor to design when working within communities on sensitive sites. The conclusion of this project required two stages, to complete it to the stage a final design project that demonstrated complete engagement with the local community, Iwi and stakeholders could take place. The first stage was a public exhibition of the research findings and the artwork based on it. The exhibition allowed the community to see the findings as a celebration of their environment and as a document of work they can contribute to. This document is being used to lobby for political will to protect, restore and design a solution to create the walkway through presentations to Local Boards and finally the Auckland Council. There is now a body of work advocating for the sites that is being to be placed into cyberspace as living resource for future researchers.

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  • Titiro whakamuri, hoki whakamua. We are the future, the present and the past: Caring for self, others and the environment in early years’ teaching and learning

    Ritchie, Jenny; Duhn, Iris; Rau, Cheryl; Craw, Janita (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project focuses on global issues of ecological sustainability in a variety of national/local early childhood contexts. The research aims to illuminate, document, explore, and explain possibilities for early childhood pedagogies that reflect and enact an ethic of care for self, others, and the environment. The project draws from both kaupapa Maori and western perspectives.

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  • Urban reprogramming at Sunnynook: Can a landscape strategy for an urban design project provide satisfactory planning direction for a local body?

    Griffiths, Pete (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Centre plans, analysis documents, and urban renewal documents, appear on council’s shelves and archives under many names. An examination of the contents page, in these documents, reveals a seemingly full and rigorous analytical study of existing site conditions has been carried out, but on closer inspection some areas of weaknesses are revealed. For example, often an analysis of the open space or parks and reserve networks are undertaken, which consist of a list of these areas…and that’s all. This project aims to make a thorough investigation into the open green spaces that populate the immediate vicinity of the Sunnynook town centre, with the aim of providing some initial concepts for the reprogramming of Sunnynook town centre. This reprogramming will be entirely driven by the inherent potentials of the ecological diversity of the open green spaces. An acknowledgement is made at this point that other important factors such as social conditions, economic and political factors, and other necessary components of the site have been sidelined in order to focus entirely on the potentials of the ecological diversity mentioned earlier.

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  • Enhancing the learning of professionalism in the context of Web 2.0.

    Gasquoine, Sue (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Thus far this project has involved collaboration nationally and now internationally and is inter-disciplinary in nature. The recruitment strategy used has proved ineffective so while not enough data has been collected to justify analysis, an unanticipated outcome has been the recent inclusion of the international partner & the need to be innovative with recruiting participants. Data collection has now recommenced.

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  • The everyday collective laboratory: Suburban interventions

    Woodruffe, Paul (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The highlights of the project were the discoveries made into inter-disciplinary research methodology and strategies for small-scale design interventions in advocating for community environmental projects. The approach was to continue to develop relationships with the community organizations that I had worked with in the previous research period in 2010. Previous findings made clear the necessity for small-scale inexpensive interventions to inform and advocate for initiatives identified by the collaboration between our researchers and the community. Two methods were considered to be the most effective. Firstly the use of QR Codes placed within the landscape that would direct visitors to both the research findings, and the community websites created to support the cultural activities existing within the neighbourhood. Secondly the use of a 30 edition lithographic print that articulated both the history of the subject sites and the agreed concept to develop a heritage walkway, this edition was distributed amongst the community stakeholders and decision makers in local government. Auckland Council Parks and Heritage expressed an interest in trialling the use of QR Codes in a test area, and we are having on-going discussions on this. Both of these interventions proved to have great potential to inexpensively deliver the ability to both record and disseminate information discreetly, as well as to lobby for legal protection, restoration and present design solutions for a specific environmental issue.

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  • Status of the spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) in the Hauraki Gulf

    Galbraith, Mel (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project studied aspects of the population of spotted shag (Stictocarbo punctatus) that is considered to be in decline in the Hauraki Gulf. The aim of the project was to initiate an update of population data, a necessary precursor to future ecological research intended to inform management of this species and Gulf seabirds in general. Population data was gathered through field surveys of islands of the inner Hauraki Gulf. The project has updated aspects of population data for the species, with the general conclusion that the population is stable, although with fewer breeding colonies than when last surveyed in 1970. The need for further field surveys was also identified. The project findings are to be disseminated as “preliminary results” at the 2012 Ornithological Society of NZ conference.

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