478 results for Unclassified

  • Sydenham 2020 - Industrial Occupation

    Budgett, Jeanette; Bogunovich, Dushko (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    East Sydenham, traditionally a working class area on the southern fringe of Christchurch is today an inner city suburb with interesting potential for redevelopment. South of Moorhouse Ave, it reveals a remarkably consistent urban footprint of industrial factories, warehouses and commercial premises. Outside the mooted Green Frame and the CBD (Central Business District) of Christchurch’s Blueprint, East Sydenham might easily fall outside the purview of the city planners. Such areas display pragmatic commercial forces at work - a condition that seems to occur largely without architects.

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  • The Polycentric City: What does it mean for Christchurch?

    Bogunovich, Dushko; Budgett, Jeanette (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Almost three years after the Second Earthquake, it is becoming clearer that the CBD has a long way to go to full recovery. It may take 20 rather than 10 years before a new Central City Christchurch emerges from the present wasteland. That poses the question whether there are alternative, or additional, strategies beyond the Blueprint. Larger Christchurch has more centres of activity than the CBD. And indeed, some of them are manifesting themselves quite robustly already. They are also proliferating in numbers, to the point that Christchurch increasingly looks like a textbook example of ‘doughnut city’ – an urban area with functional suburbs, but an almost empty core. This year’s Summer School opted to investigate the ‘polycentricity’ of Christchurch – whether as real, potential, or desirable - in an attempt, not to undermine the hard work of rebuilding the Centre, but to make propositions complementary to the Blueprint. The three studios interrogated the concept itself; what it means in an era of rampant urban sprawl and the quest for sustainability; and whether Christchurch’s given physical conditions offer specific opportunities not present in other cities. Polycentricity is not only possible in Christchurch: it already exists – as you would expect in a city of this size, with such flat topography and such low density. Before the earthquakes, it manifested itself mostly in the form of one dominant CBD and many suburban sub-centres. These sub-centers were originally modest local shopping centres with community facilities, but over the past 20 or 30 years some of them morphed into shopping malls, which now anchor the major suburban centres. After the earthquake, the city all but lost the main centre – the CBD – while the existing malls prospered. Compounded by the housing shortage, and the Council’s allocation of new green field sites for residential developments on the fringe of the city, new suburban centres are appearing further out from the centre. Polycentricity is also desirable in Christchurch. The city is growing horizontally more than ever and the CBD is proving to be less accessible for a growing number of people. What this studio has shown is that polycentric development is not only possible but likely very desirable at the inner city scale.

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  • Oceanic Architecture

    Austin, Michael (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Pacific pavilions The Oceanic way of building boats involves duplicating hulls “One would imagine that a contrivance so simple and practical for pro- curing stability and increased carrying capacity would have been adopted everywhere, but as a matter of fact it belongs almost exclusively to the Indo-Pacific area.” Until very recently no one would have thought that the America’s Cup, the premier global yachting contest, would be sailed in multi-hulled craft originating from the Pacific. In the same way that we can characterise the Oceanic canoe as uniquely multi-hulled there are a number of generalisations that can be made about Pacific Island buildings. The first is that they are universally single-celled pavilions. Small or large, Pacific buildings are always unicellular, and free-standing in open space. Differentiation and separation are achieved not by walls and partitions, but by space, much as islands are separated by sea. This term for this spacing is va, an Oceanic word, that, with numerous complex variations and translations, is applied to both the social and physical worlds. Fundamentals In the Pacific the gabled house form, which goes under variants of the term fale and which is known in New Zealand as the whare, is also standard. The gable cross section is, surprisingly, an inherently unstable form and it is, of course, a form that is not confined to the Pacific. The characteristic of the gable in Oceania is that posts support the ridge pole, which has the structural benefit of eliminating outward thrust on the wall posts; in the West this lateral load is usually resisted by trusses or buttresses. Sometimes this ridge post is truncated to become a king post, but always the ridge is propped. These props have all manner of symbolic associations. In the Māori whare the ridge post, or poutokomanawa, is the heart of the named ancestor who is the house. This identification is detailed and literal. The gable house form, in all its variations, is utterly fundamental to Pacific architecture.

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  • An examination of the ACE market in New Zealand: Efficiency and deemed value mitigation.

    Stewart, James; Leaver, Jonathan (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Part One – Efficiency of the ACE Market 1. The ACE market appears to meet the standard conditions for efficient markets. 2. Several information sources exist for the New Zealand Annual Catch Entitlements (ACE) market making information easily accessible. 3. Small fishers are reliant on Licensed Fish Receivers (LFRs) for both ACE information and access to ACE, and are concerned that excessive market power exists in the ACE market – small fishers are at a competitive disadvantage. 4. Larger fishers search for ACE information data more frequently than small fishers and rely on commercially supplied information via FishServe and direct fisher contacts. 5. ACE market participants utilise networks, including quota brokers and LFR–fisher relationships in ACE sourcing and trading. Part Two – Arbitrage in the NZ ACE Market: Deemed Value Mitigation 1. Trade in ACE between overfished fishers for reducing deemed value liability exists in the New Zealand ACE market. 2. Over the seven year period 2005 to 2012 ACE arbitrage trading resulted in savings in deemed value obligations of $1.766 million. 3. The number of fishstocks where arbitrage trading occurs is a small percentage of total fishstocks; in 2012 only seven fishstocks had deemed value savings, through arbitrage, of more than $1000. 4. The general trend in arbitrage trading for 2005 to 2012 is downward – the notable exception being Ling 7

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  • The Application of Quality of Life Metrics

    Potangaroa, Regan; Santosa, Happy; Wilkinson, Susan (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The current “resilience gap” is how it can be enabled in reality from its apparent idealistic grounding? This chapter accepts that a first step should be the establishment of a suitable metric for resilience measurement. It then describes the theoretical construct for using Quality of Life Models and develops one particular model, namely the DASS42. It does this with 7 case studies that cover a decade of work in various post disaster situations. The case studies seek to highlight the operational contexts and issues encountered to reach this “reality” of enabling resilience; and the lessons learnt trying. • Banda Aceh, Indonesia in 2005 (Asian Tsunami 2004) • Manshera, Pakistan in 2005 (The Kashmir Earthquake 2005) • Sichuan, China in 2008 (The Sichuan or Wenchuan Earthquake 2008). • Port au Prince, Haiti in 2011 (The Haitian Earthquake 2010) • The Eastern Suburbs of Christchurch in 2011 (The Christchurch Earthquake 2011) • Tacloban, Philippines in 2013 (Typhoon Haiyan or Yolanda 2013) • Informal settlements in Surabaya, Indonesia in 2008 and 2013 (no disaster as such).

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  • Security of Wireless Devices using Biological-Inspired RF Fingerprinting Technique

    Rehman, Saeed; Alam, Shafiq; Ardekani, Iman (2014-11-23)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Radio Frequency (RF) fingerprinting is a security mechanism inspired by biological fingerprint identification systems. RF fingerprinting is proposed as a means of providing an additional layer of security for wireless devices. RF fingerprinting classification is performed by selecting an “unknown” signal from the pool, generating its RF fingerprint, and using a classifier to correlate the received RF fingerprint witheach profile RF fingerprint stored in the database. Unlike a human biological fingerprint, RF fingerprint of a wireless device changes with the received Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) and varies due to mobility of the transmitter/receiver and environment. The variations in the features of RF fingerprints affect the classification results of the RF fingerprinting. This chapter evaluates the performance of the KNN and neural network classification for varying SNR. Performance analysis is performed for three scenarios that correspond to the situation, when either transmitter or receiver is mobile, and SNR changes from low to high or vice versa.

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  • A trade-off in learning: Mobile augmented reality for language learning

    Reinders, Hayo; Lakarnchua, Onuma; Pegrum, Mark (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Mobile learning offers great potential for language teachers to support practice beyond the classroom, to encourage anytime-anywhere learning and to facilitate situated learning (Pegrum, forthcoming). Augmented reality (AR) apps are a type of mobile application that allows users to overlay the physical world with digital information, for example by attaching pictures, text and audio or video. These can be added to particular real-world objects and locations and become available for others to use when using an AR app on their phones. Teachers can use activities with AR to encourage learners to practise their language skills outside the classroom and to share information with other learners and the wider community. Some exciting projects and studies have been carried out (Holden & Sykes 2011) but so far the potential of AR for mainstream language education is only just starting to be explored. In this article we describe an activity in which students had to create a mobile tour for visitors to their campus. We detail the way we designed the activity, its instructions and procedures, as well as the technologies used. We then describe how the students went about completing the activity and their reaction to it. From this we draw some practical implications for language teaching and offer some suggestions for other teachers who may wish to use AR or other mobile learning activities with their students.

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  • Nau he kete naku he kete: An implementation and evaluation of kete-based approaches to teaching and learning te reo Maori me ona tikanga

    Heta-Lensen, Yo; Job, Nicole; Turton, Lee-Anne; Potter, Jennie (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • The impact of educational migration on the professional lives of Colombo Plan scholarship holders

    Collins, Jenny (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project is producing new knowledge that will add to our understandings of the long term impacts of educational migration on the cultural, economic and professional lives of education migrants and their ongoing engagement as „global‟ citizens. Phase one of this project has now been completed. In 2009 the researcher interviewed 11 former Colombo Plan Scholars in Malaysia and undertook archive searches in Singapore, Wellington, and Dunedin. Phase two is now underway. In 2010 the researcher has undertaken follow-up archive searches in Singapore, Wellington and Christchurch (taking advantage of other travel opportunities and not using URC funding). Follow-up interviews with New Zealand host families; foreign affairs contacts etc are planned. This project is still ongoing. In 2010 the Researcher took up a new programme leadership role and as a consequence of this and the restructuring within the Department of Education there have been some delays in regard to publications emerging of phase one. However, progress in this regard is back on track with an abstract accepted for an international conference (Australia and New Zealand History of Education Society), an invitation to write a chapter for an edited book on Australasian Universities and a paper underway for submission to an international refereed journal.

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  • Benchmarking computer use in the NZ construction industry

    Davies, Kathryn (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Cool new Asia : experiencing East Asian popular culture

    Wilson, Scott (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Cool New Asia: East Asian Popular Culture in a Local Context was held at Unitec during the weekend of November 25-26th. The symposium attracted two international keynote speakers (Professor Koichi Iwabuchi and Professor Matt Allen), twenty-six speakers from both national and international tertiary environments and approximately one hundred and twenty attendees over the two days. The papers delivered covered a range of disciplines and theoretical approaches and, as was hoped, reflected a broad interdisciplinary examination, from across the humanities, of ideas pertaining to popular culture in general, Asian popular culture (of a variety of forms), in particular, and other issues related to these two including population diaspora, second-language education, representation and self-representation, and community construction, location and relocation as a result of globalisation. The weekend delivered a number of highlights; of these, the cultural performances by Madang Hannuri (a Korean performance troupe), the E-Pacs Lion Dance Team, and Hokushin Shinoh Ryu Iaido (a Japanese martial arts troupe) were the most popular and engaging. However, beyond the world of cultural performance, the symposium’s chief success, we believe, was that it (a) successfully identified a hitherto overlooked area of study, (b) provided a forum for a rigorous examination of issues pertaining to these, and (c) offers an opportunity to continue this exploration as the Cool New Asia project moves into its second phase. This second phase – discussed in the initial application for funding – refers to the manner with which Drs. Kolesova and Wilson are working to develop concrete research outcomes out of the material generated by the symposium. More information about this is provided below. The symposium organizers wish to extend their enormous gratitude and thanks to the URC committee for making such a successful event possible. We would particularly like to acknowledge the incredible help provided by Brenda Massey.

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  • Learning about Landscape Odo Strewe and the Group

    Francis, Kerry (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In Europe and the United States, landscape architecture came late to the modernist party. New Zealand was no exception. While architects here were exploring variants of modernism from the late 1930s, modernist landscapes did not appear until the middle of that century. When Odo Strewe arrived in Auckland in 1948, his gregarious nature and commitment to the modernist project led him to engage with members of a vibrant arts subculture, mainly in the west of the city. Bill Wilson and other members of the Group, as well as many of their clients, were part of this subculture. This chapter surveys a body of work that Strewe did with the Group, primarily Wilson, and proposes that his development as a practitioner in the new field of landscape architecture was enhanced by this collaboration and by the dialogue that accompanied it. Architecture was a key ingredient. In the absence of any local landscape discourse, it was through his relationship with Wilson and the Group and the projects involving landscape and architecture that Strewe established himself at the forefront of the new discipline.

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  • Entertainment Lab for the Very Small Screen

    Wagner, Daniel (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Student participants in three countries across the planet collaborated to make movies, with their mobile phones, about environmental sustainability. The thirty‐nine participants ‐ film & television students at Unitec PASA; acoustics and sound students at Salford University in Manchester, UK; and graphic design students at Université de Strasbourg in Strasbourg, France ‐ divided into four international teams (each of which consisted of students from all three countries). They used a variety of Web 2 tools – Google Docs, Google+ Hangouts, Twitter, Dropbox, WordPress ‐ to collaboratively determine the specific subject matter and the story of each team’s film, the shots they would need to tell each story, and in which country each shot would be taken. In the end, they delivered four mobile movies that looked at different sustainability sub‐topics. The project was capped with feedback from the lecturers involved and by video reflections from the students.

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  • Robotic chair for remote cardiovascular risk assessment

    Jayawardena, Chandimal (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The objective of this project was to develop an intelligent robotic chair for cardiovascular risk assessment. The first prototype of the chair is currently in the technical testing phase. This robotic chair can engage users (patients) using human-robot interaction strategies and help them improve their cardiovascular risk. It measures several clinical parameters within a short period of time, by providing appropriate instructions to the user. Collectively these measurements can be used to provide a comprehensive assessment of the severity of heart failure symptoms, and this information may then be used to guide management and avoid hospital admission.

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  • Te Ako Whaiora - through learning is well-being

    Penetito, Kim (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In 2009 Unitec and Te Rau Matatini entered into a partnership agreement to deliver the GDNFPM to scholarship recipients from the Māori Mental Health sector (as a separate stream from the generic course intake). Te Rau Matatini scholarship criteria are that the recipient is Māori and is actively employed in the sector. Te Rau Matatini sought out Unitec as the preferred provider to work with these emerging leaders within the Māori Mental Health sector. Te Rau Matatini liked the content and its value, and they had received positive feedback about the teaching style (thought to be suitable for Māori learners). The agreement specified a 3 year period (2009‐2012) to appoint a Māori tutor, increase the Māori content and literature of the course and increase the number of Māori teaching staff to assist with the programme being revamped to create a best fit for the Māori learner. The majority of students who were enrolled in the cohort that became known as Te Rau Matatini were in fact bursars of Te Rau Matatini funding, however some had not been eligible for the Te Rau Matatini criteria but were Māori and managed to gain District Health Board scholarships to enable them to participate. This challenge was taken on by Unitec and with the appointment of a Māori tutor in the second year of this agreement it was essential that the GDNFPM initiate a way of examining their performance and how effective this had been at the end of this period. GDNFPM staff supported a proposal to review the delivery to this cohort by interviewing students, Te Rau Matatini, employees of the participating students and themselves as the tutors. 2011 was the last year of Te Rau Matatini sponsored students on the GDNFPM.Te Rau Matatini were consulted on a research funding proposal outlining the project and invited to provide their comments on the Ethics Application draft as partners, prior to an ethics application being submitted. Some verbal feedback was received and noted. The only concern that was raised by the CEO at the time was to ensure that the project was not in any way focused on critiquing any participants on the programme who were Mental Health consumers. In August 2011Te AkoWhaiora (the name given to the research) was approved by the Unitec Research Ethics Committee.

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  • The effects of aural input enhancement on L2 acquisition

    Reinders, Hayo; Cho, Meiyoung (2013-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Input enhancement involves attempts to direct the learner’s attention to specific linguistic forms in target language input (Sharwood Smith, 1993). One way to do this is by manipulating the input in order to attract learners’ attention to the target feature, for example, by underlining or bolding it or by artificially increasing its frequency in the input (an input flood). A number of studies have investigated the effects of enriched input (e.g., Jourdenais, Ota, Stauffer, Boyson, & Doughty, 1995; Reinders & Ellis, 2009; Trahey & White, 1993; White, 1998). Although there is some evidence that enriched input can affect L2 acquisition of certain grammatical features, the results are not conclusive. Furthermore, previous studies have been limited to textual input enrichment. In this chapter we investigated the effects of aural input enhancement, a type of input enhancement that to the best of our knowledge has not been reported on before. Participants in the study were given an audiobook to listen to outside of class in which passive structures had been manipulated by 1) artificially increasing the volume slightly of the target items or by 2) slowing down the speed with which the target items were read out. A control group listened to the audiobooks in their original form. The repeated-measures ANOVA analysis showed no significant effect for the manipulated input on acquiring the target form. We discuss some possible reasons for this finding.

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  • How can ERO review the quality of education in centres if they don't know what children are learning?

    Blaiklock, Ken (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The focus of this presentation is not on the processes of self-review but on the lack of valid information that centres have on the effectiveness of their programmes for enhancing children’s learning ...

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  • Monitoring terrestrial bird populations on Tiritiri Matangi Island, Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand, 1987-2010

    Graham, Mike; Veitch, Dick; Aguilar, Glenn; Galbraith, Mel (2013-11-18)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Tiritiri Matangi Island is a Scientific Reserve located in the Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand. In 1986, two years after the start of a ten-year planting programme on the island, members of the Ornithological Society of New Zealand, Auckland, began a monitoring programme of the bird populations. A biannual survey scheme commenced in April 1987, counting birds on predetermined transects and at listening posts. This paper focuses on the spring dataset (November) to provide an overview of changes in relative abundance of birds from 1987 to 2010. Over this time, a revegetation programme, the successful translocation of 11 native bird species to the island and eradication of kiore (Pacific rat Rattus exulans) have altered the dynamics of the environment. Overall, an increase in indigenous avian biodiversity and abundance was recorded, although the increase was dominated by two species, the tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae) and bellbird (Anthornis melanura). Substantial increases in population abundance were observed in the translocated species recorded in the counts. Exotic species and common forest passerines (fantail Rhipidura fuliginosa, grey warbler Gerygone igata, silvereye Zosterops lateralis) declined. Some of the possible reasons for these changes are discussed.

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  • Akoaga : efficacy, agency, achievement and success in the tertiary sector : focus on students and parents from Pasifika communities

    Marat, Deepa; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Latu, Savae; Aumua, Linda; Talakai, Malia; Sun, Kang (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The term akoaga has a pan-Polynesian origin and meaning. In the Samoan language, the term can be broken into two root words, ako and aga. Ako or ato means basket and aga means measurements associated with weaving.

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  • Systems dynamics modelling of pathways to a hydrogen economy in New Zealand : final report

    Leaver, Jonathan; Gillingham, Kenneth; Baglino, A. (2012-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report represents a compilation of work prepared under Objective 6: Carbon to Hydrogen Energy – Proof of Concept of FRST contract C08X0204.

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