541 results for Unclassified

  • Landscapes for life (Stage 2) – An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Results from stage 2 of this project have shown that a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks and ethics approval has now been gained for a trial relocation to occur. The results of stage 2 are now providing a solid basis, including comparison of food species from Shakespear and those found on the roof, of the research. Vegetation cover on the roof has significantly increased in the last year (over 70% cover) which provides further enhancement of potential success for the relocation. Project highlights: • Collaboration with Auckland Council to gain gut contents to analyse to support food source analysis for the relocation and results confirming food source on roof matches with preferred species being eaten by skink. • Feedback from international conference which confirmed that a relocation of lizards has occurred in Australia onto a living roof with great success which will support our permit application with DOC. • A site visit from English living roof expert who has said the living roof at Waitakere is his favourite living roof internationally and is supporting further dissemination of the research at the Green Roof world congress in the Netherlands in September.

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  • A micro-study of Greek female immigrants to New Zealand in the 60s

    Tsoulis, Athina (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The research aim of this research project was to explore the migratory experiences of a distinct group of single women who left Greece en masse to undertake domestic work in New Zealand in the early 1960’s. This was an unprecedented occurrence for traditional Greek culture, which, at the time, was essentially patriarchal and women did not travel, far less live away from home without the supervision of a male or older member of the family. Who were these women, why and how did they persuade their families to allow them to leave, what impact did the freedom and difference of western culture have upon these unchaperoned women and how did it change their lives were some of the questions we sought to discover. The documentary form was chosen to complement the fifteen interviews of representatives of this group we undertook as part of the Ministry of Culture and Heritage’s oral history grant and which will be shortly lodged in the Alexander Turnbull Library for the benefit of future researchers. What became very evident was the devastating impact that World War II had upon the Cretan population, particularly in the west coast in the mountainous regions behind Hania. This was largely due to the punishment meted out by the Germans retaliating against the support the local Cretan population gave to the British and New Zealand forces engaged in the struggle. The Cretans paid dearly for their support and fathers and adult brothers were rounded up systematically and shot or imprisoned in unbearable conditions for long periods, and dwellings and personal possessions were destroyed leaving women and children scrabbling for food and basic necessities. The grind of daily life which had little relief for many of these women who did not know much childhood pleasure, constantly helping the family in daily survival led to many of the women who decided to emigrate long for a better way of life. Many of them resented never enjoying the fruits of their labour or control on how it was spent as money went to male members of the family to dispense with. Many were influenced by the stories coming from the Greek diaspora and their adventurous spirit was aroused as they rejected the lives proscribed for female womanhood in their local environments. The abruptness of the migration experience, severing with all that is familiar and going into the unknown was a traumatic experience no matter how much the women desired to leave. And things were never the same. Community was disrupted and attempts to reclaim this were successful as the new immigrants clung together and recreated familiar Greek rituals and celebrations but again were disrupted as the unsettled immigrants decided to move to Australia to be part of a greater Greek community or returned back home. Visits home highlighted the disruption for these women as villages were emptied, loved ones dead or gone, villages becoming ghost towns. We found that the Greek women we interviewed were reluctant to criticise their new host country and many spoke well of how they were treated by New Zealanders. Yet the toll the migration experience had upon them and their children is quite profound.

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  • Measuring social cohesion in community settings: Case studies of pre- and post-Internet intervention

    Williams, Jocelyn (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This case study in a school community near Unitec, in Avondale, aimed to assess strategies for building social cohesion as an element in successful implementation of a community internet scheme. It focused specifically on a subsidiary goal to examine the use of social media as tools for building social cohesion. The work involved mentoring among and informal discussions and focus groups with a proportion of 31 parents who were participating in the implementation of Computers in Homes at the school. My previous research indicates a need to further investigate the role of social support among late adopter, new users of the internet, and this study is progressing that work by addressing a role for online social networking. Results, as in previous studies within Computers in Homes, reinforce the conclusion that this organization uses very effective face-to-face socialisation strategies to enhance belonging and support, but also that the Ning social network appears to be of particular appeal to parents in this situation, offering a new medium for finding support. The latter finding is encouraging and is the subject of ongoing evaluation. As detailed in other sections below, findings are emerging from copious data that still needs analyzing but has been referred to in two quality-assured publications. Considerable volumes of further analysis and commentary needs to be done and will emerge in new publications in 2012.

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  • Extension of use of action research as real and applied research for improvement of teaching and learning at Unitec

    Smith, Mark (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Action Research Project in 2011 involved a cluster of 12 action research (AR) projects across 6 departments at Unitec – Languages, Sport, Te Puna Ako, the Library, Foundation Studies and Music. Each project was an individual piece of action research, had specific research questions relevant to the project topic and had its own findings. Each was subject to the normal ethics approval process at Unitec. A meta-evaluation of the effectiveness of action research as a professional development strategy was also carried out. It was encouraging to see so many first time researchers taking this initial step into investigating their teaching and learning. The results of the meta-evaluation indicated the benefits of this sort of professional development. The other main aim of the project was to ensure that literacy and numeracy interventions were designed and implemented in a step toward ensuring these became business as usual. This was achieved across all the projects. Another achievement of the project was the cross-disciplinary nature of much of the research. Breaking away from silos saw collaboration between music lecturers and literacy experts, automotive mechanics and academic advisors, lecturers and e-learning advisors, the Departments of Architecture and Languages, Te Puna Ako and the Department of Sport. Finally, because of the number of projects, a layer of mentors was created to ensure that assistance was available to all researchers. This built capability in the Academic Literacies team which has allowed the project to continue in 2012 despite the departure of Eileen Piggot-Irvine.

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  • Forget failure - Focus on success to plan for lasting change

    Marshall, Steven (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

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  • Effecting change in learning and teaching through living curricula implementation

    Keesing-Styles, Linda (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project focused directly and concertedly on teacher perspectives of the current implementation of the Living Curriculum at Unitec. The major goal was to inform and influence the implementation and professional development components of the Living Curriculum. The project used a case study methodology interviewing teachers from three departments, each representing one of the institution’s three faculties. These were diverse departments reflecting quite different disciplines and teacher perspectives. While some departments were well developed in their thinking and understanding of the Living Curriculum, others were less informed and more resistant. The project team interviewed teachers across the three departments to elicit in-depth information about teacher perspectives and implementation progress. The interviews offered a wealth of valuable information about teacher perspectives. The major finding is the importance of ongoing teacher professional development with regard to interpretation of the Living Curriculum and implications for teaching and learning practice. Allied to this is valuable data on the provision of institutional support and change management for curriculum renewal including the provision of exemplars for teachers.

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  • Modelling and monitoring the Unitec standard house to improve sustainability and indoor environmental quality

    Tait, Robert (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This project takes a two-pronged approach to investigate issues around the thermal performance and internal environment of New Zealand housing. The first stage of measuring has been completed and the BIM model successfully integrated with the simulation software. Unitec has a Faculty of Technology and Built Environment facility for research driven learning in the New Zealand building industry.

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  • Analysis of the Australian data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the Sydney release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the Regent Hotel, Sydney, 4th August, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-08)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Are Australian children unique or are they similar to other children in Asia? In my short review of the truly massive amount of data collected in the Cartoon Networks New GenerAsians survey, I can only touch upon, in a speculative manner some of the interesting findings. These include the importance placed on friendship by Australian children and how that may diminish other institutions like home and school, their belief in importance of individuality, their high access to electronic media, and how this competes with TV. Also there are interesting age and gender patterns.

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  • Report on the self-access centre at Unitec

    Burns, Trish; Martin-Blaker, Jeannie (1998-05)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report outlines the background of self-access learning, describes the situation of the existing Self-Access Centre at UNITEC, highlights the characteristics of the leading Self-Access Centres in New Zealand and around the world, and makes recommendations regarding the future development of the Centre at Unitec in the areas of physical layout, systems, resources, services, and staffing. It presents a range of options regarding the future location of the SAC, with the implications involved in each.

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  • Analysis of the Hong Kong data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians Survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the Hong Kong release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the New World Harbourview Hotel, Hong Kong, 23rd June, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-06)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As a researcher on the impact of television on children, I'm interested in the relationship between watching TV and other activities.

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  • Television watching, enjoyment of school and respect for parents: Analysis of the Indian data from the Cartoon Network's New GenerAsians survey: Presentation made in conjunction with the New Dehli release of data from the 12 Asian nation study of youth attitudes, perceptions and behaviours at the Taj Mahal Hotel, New Delhi, 22nd July, 1998

    Bridgman, Geoff (1998-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As a researcher on the impact of television violence on children, I'm interested in the relationship between television generally and children's behaviour. As parents we worry about the impact of TV on our children, particularly we worry that that our children watch too much TV and that this will affect their education. The Indian results seemed to go against conventional wisdom, for what we found was a country where children appeared to be more enthusiastic about TV than anywhere else, and yet their enthusiasm for school and family were unexcelled.

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  • Working in the light of evidence, as well as commitment. A literature review of the best available evidence about effective adult literacy, numeracy and language teaching

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison; Lander, J. (2005)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The purpose of this literature review is to provide a critical evaluation of the available research evidence about effective practices in literacy, numeracy and language (LNL) teaching and programme provision in order to inform policy development within the broader arena of foundation learning. Despite the growing recognition of the importance of LNL, there is still a dearth of specific research relating to this area in New Zealand and the situation is only marginally better overseas. It is noteworthy however that in the process of undertaking this review, we have become aware of a considerable number of substantial, intervention studies that are currently underway or due for completion in 2005-2006. The results of these studies are likely to be very useful to us in future.

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  • Case study : United States

    Benseman, John; Comings, J. (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    As with many other OECD countries, the United States of America (U.S.) estimated the literacy skills of its adult population as part of the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS). The U.S. published the results of its National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), which employed what became the English version of the IALS test, in 1994 (citation1), and then published the results of a second estimate in 2006 after the completion of the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), which employed the same test. The NAAL (citation2) changed the familiar five levels of skill identified in the IALS to four levels, labelled below basic, basic, intermediate, and proficient. In addition, it dropped several million adults from the sample because they could not answer any of the test questions. The score range in below basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 1, and the score range in basic is slightly below that of IALS Level 2. Though the reporting of NAAL levels is different, any particular score on the NAAL is equivalent to that score on the IALS and NALS.

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  • Foundation learning in New Zealand: an overview

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This book comes at a timely point in the development of the foundation skills sector in New Zealand. The purpose of this first chapter is to provide an overall context, by reviewing what is meant by the term foundation skills and its various synonyms before moving on to a brief history of the sector in New Zealand and in particular, the significance of the 1996 International Adult Literacy Survey that proved to be a turning-point in its development. Following a discussion of the broader significance of research and evaluation, the chapter then reviews where we stand at present in terms of policy, the range of provision operating and the learners that it serves. Finally, an outline is provided of the book’s chapters and what they cover.

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  • "I'm a different person now" : an evaluation of the Manukau Family Literacy Program (MFLP)

    Benseman, John (2004)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Manukau Family Literacy Programmes (MFLP) The MFLP grew out of an initiative by the Literacy Taskforce of the City of Manukau Education Trust (COMET). The initial planning for the programmes was undertaken during 2002, culminating in two pilot sites starting operation in 2003 at Bairds Otara and Rowandale in Manurewa. Four sites are planned for 2004.

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  • OECD/CERI Formative assessment project background report : New Zealand

    Benseman, John (2008)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    While there had been a community-based adult literacy movement active in New Zealand since the late 1970s (Hill, 1990), the sector’s provision and political presence was marginal at best. Its advocates struggled to establish a secure funding source without a research base, within an educational system that had long prided itself on its child literacy achievements and therefore had scepticism about the existence of adult literacy issues. The results from the International Adult Literacy Survey (IALS) in 1996 proved to be a turning-point, as it provided the first substantial evidence of the levels of New Zealand adults’ basic skills. Like a lot of comparable countries such as Canada, the US and Australia, the IALS results (OECD, 1997) showed that approximately one quarter of New Zealand adults were operating at Level 1 and a similar proportion at Level 2. While all groups were represented to some degree in the lower skill categories, there were disproportionately higher numbers of Pacific Islanders,1 Maori2, those who have a first language other than English, those with minimal secondary education, older people and those not in employment. Further analyses (Ministry of Education, 2004; Workbase, 1998) showed concentrations of low skill populations in some rural areas (especially the Far North and the eastern North Island) and the Auckland metropolitan area and in blue-collar occupations, the manufacturing, agricultural, hunting and fishing industries. These results are reasonably akin to other countries with which New Zealand traditionally compares itself such as Australia, Canada and the US, but behind others like Sweden and the Netherlands.

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  • Collaborative goal setting and reviewing in music therapy for children with special needs: An action research project to improve practice and measure efficacy

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen; Molyneaux, Claire; Willis, Marie; Talmage, Alison; Scoones, Russell; Travaglia, Rebecca; Gang, Na-Hyun (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre (Raukatauri) is New Zealand's first music therapy centre delivering music therapy to children and young people with special needs up to the age of 21. There are six New Zealand Registered Music Therapists (NZRMThs) on the clinical team who provide approximately 100 sessions of music therapy per week. The therapists have a variety of training backgrounds, with the common approach being improvisational, client-centred music therapy.

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  • Family literacy – a case study in how to develop policy

    Benseman, John; Sutton, Alison (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    'Adult learning makes a difference - to the economy of course, to health, well-being, confidence and to our ability to help our children. Alan Tuckett - 4 December 2006 Alan has steadfastly believed that the inherent power of adult learning has been to change adults’ self-perceptions and subsequently their worlds through learning what they needed relevant to their particular interests and issues. Intergenerational family literacy epitomises relevant adult learning. Family literacy programmes engage adults in their role as parents, providing learning opportunities for them to enhance their literacy and, also their parenting skills, particularly in relation to their children’s emerging literacy skills. The programmes recognise adults as learners in their own right, but also as powerful influences on those around them in their homes and communities.

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  • Komuniti Tok Piksa Integrating Papua New Guinean Highland narratives into visual HIV prevention and education material

    Thomas, Verena; Britton, R; Eggins, K; Kualawi, J.; Mel, M.; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Iedema, R. (2012)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This report presents the findings of the first phase of the Komuniti Tok Piksa (henceforth ‘KTP’) project, a research project commissioned by the National AIDS Council and AusAID under the large research grant funding round. The study, conducted by a team comprising researchers from the University of Technology Sydney and the University of Goroka, investigates the use of visual and creative tools in HIV and AIDS prevention and education in Papua New Guinea. Its initial run, from November 2009 to September 2011, focused on the PNG Highlands region, which is characterised by diverse and often-remote communities with low access to mass media.

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  • Transnational Student Experience: Educational Spaces Created by Globalization

    Monteiro, Sylila; Sharma, Rashika (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    It is accepted that education today is continually challenged by the process of economic globalization. Consequently the international knowledge network is constantly affected by developments beyond the control of academic institutions. In response to this increasingly integrated world economy, governments and academic institutes implement policies and programmes of internationalisation. These shifting paradigms driven by technological and societal transformation direct education towards embracing international exchange to enhance the student experience and extend global expertise. International inter-institutional partnerships in education are a common practice globally. Joint ventures termed as transnational education seek to ensure curriculum equivalence. Transnationalism allows a wider range of educational options for students through these partnerships, filling the gaps that exist in the systems of each partner. However the reality is far from ideal. Transnationalism presents potentials and pitfalls which challenge the success of the programmes, as students transition from one learning paradigm to another. This paper explores the partnership between Unitec, New Zealand and an Asian automotive institute and highlights the impediments transnational students encounter with teaching and learning. It also reflects on teaching and learning strategies required to enhance the overseas student learning experience that may be considerably different from that on their home campus.

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