538 results for Unclassified

  • Introduction : representation and voice in a complex communication environment

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Representation is, of course, a central analytical concept with media, communication and cultural inquiry. The centrality of representation – of expression, mediation, institutional form and cultural negotiation - to issues of public debate and engagement, the quality of our media and to the measure of human agency and of our institutions is a notion that grounds our research and inquiry at Unitec. Representation is a central foundation of our research strategy and a central theme of this collection. A parallel interest and sensitivity to the place of voice within contemporary communicative practices provides a second foundational concept for our research activities. With an interest in voice we are focusing our attention on individuals, agencies and institutions and processes of ‘self’ and ‘collective’ representation that voicing implies, particularly in response to experiences or conditions of marginality (Couldry, 2010). Here, voice is understood as capacity and agency, in as much as it implies the communicative or representational act itself. Likewise, representation is an important way in which our voice can be heard. We feel strongly that how voices are intervening from the margins within contemporary New Zealand is a centrally important dynamic to be analysed and understood. We feel our Department is strongly placed to make significant contributions in this area and this collection stakes this claim.

    View record details
  • Moving forward, keeping the past in front of us : Treaty settlements, conservation co-governance and communication.

    Dodson, Giles (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    At present there is well-established recognition in New Zealand of Māori and the Crown as constitutional partners to the Treaty of Waitangi1 and commitment to partnership is widely articulated in official and public discourses. This essay addresses the current issue of how developments in Treaty policy and new institutions arising from settlement of Treaty of Waitangi claims can inform the development of institutions of co-governance within national conservation policy. This discussion is contexualised by an examination of currently evolving marine conservation policy. The essay argues that communication, as a discipline conventionally outside policy – especially science dominated conservation policy – has much to offer policymakers as we seek to understand best practice partnership and co-governance arrangements emerging from Treaty settlements.

    View record details
  • Repositioning the oral history interview : reciprocal peer interviewing within a transgenerational frame

    Donaghey, Sara (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This essay signals a departure from conventional models for the oral history interview to allow the participant voices to occupy a position of greater prominence in a collaborative process of co-creation. Reciprocal peer interviewing is an adaptation of focus group interviews; a technique that positions the narrators at the forefront of the interview process whilst the researcher takes on a secondary role as facilitator and observer. My research applies the reciprocal peer interview technique to explorations of lesbian identity and life experiences through oral testimony within a transgenerational frame. The interview lies at the heart of oral history; an intensely personal activity that provides recorded information in oral form (Fyfe and Manson, 2006). Indeed, analogies to dramatic representations are common in the literature, describing the interview as a performance during which two people interact across multiple channels of reception and transmission. Traditional interview modes place the researcher/interviewer at the forefront, engaging in an interrogatory dialogue with the narrator/interviewee. Despite an uneasy relationship with historians who at times, have viewed oral history as populist, partial and selective, one may argue that the recording of a life story is no different to an interview used as a mainstream data collection instrument in qualitative research commonly applied in the social sciences. Ultimately, one must adhere to the raison d’etre for historical study as stated by Thompson (1978, p 21) that “all history depends ultimately upon its social purpose.”

    View record details
  • Hygiene und Reinheit für das Südsee-Paradies : Preußisch-koloniale Interventionen im Samoa

    Schnoor, Christoph (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In den knapp fünfzehn Jahren ihrer kurzen Kolonialherrschaft in Samoa setzte die deutsche Verwaltung unter ihrem Gouverneur, Dr. Wilhelm Solf, eine Reihe von baulichen und infrastrukturellen Erweiterungen des Ortes Apia durch, welche wesentliche Modernisierung bedeuteten. Dieser Aufsatz untersucht sowohl die übergreifende Entwicklung Apias zu einer Kleinstadt als auch einige ausgewählte architektonische Projekte der deutschen Verwaltung. Diese Projekte werden aus der Perspektive von Hygiene und Reinheit – in direkter und in übertragener Form – betrachtet. Dabei werden zwei sich einander widersprechende Tendenzen aufgezeigt: einerseits der Versuch der Verwaltung und insbesondere des Gouverneurs Solf, Samoanisches von Fremdem zu scheiden, um die Samoa-Inseln als den ›Garten Eden‹ zu erhalten, als die sie von Deutschland aus vielfach wahrgenommen wurden. Dabei wurde Apia kurioserweise zu einem rein europäischen Ort des Fremden in Samoa. Andererseits ist die Tendenz einer Vermischung zu beobachten, die sich in Koedukation und gemeinsamer Krankenhausbetreuung zeigt sowie im Interesse, von den samoanischen Traditionen und Gegebenheiten zu lernen und diese teils in die eigene Architektur einzubeziehen. Diese Spannung zwischen Distanz und Symbiose ist nicht aufzulösen, sondern besteht in Samoa nebeneinander

    View record details
  • The governance of high performance sport

    Ferkins, Dr Lesley; Bottenburg, Maarten Van (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Upon completion of this chapter the reader should be able to:  Discuss meanings and definitions associated with the governance of sport in the high performance setting  Distinguish between organizational governance and systemic governance in relation to the evolving nature of high performance governance practice  Discuss issues and trends associated with the governance of high performance sport on the international stage

    View record details
  • Does Our Amazing Place build community resilience?

    Roberts, Linda; Gear, Carol; Howie, Nandulal; Bridgman, Geoff (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Objective The objective of this research was an evaluation of Our Amazing Place Treasure Hunt Events held in Unsworth Heights in the North Shore of Auckland and Massey in the West of Auckland respectively. The research focused on the question “Does Our Amazing Place build community resilience?”. Methods During the event participants were asked to fill out an evaluation form of their experience of the event and to provide some demographic data Results The statistics showed participants rated fun/fitness activities as the most enjoyable activity of the event. Secondly, they experienced a greater connection to their community in terms of becoming more aware of what their community had to offer and a high percentage of participants said they would continue connecting to their community after the event. Results also showed that a high percentage of participants engaging in the event lived locally and a over eighty percent of participants rated the event between 8 and 10 out of 10. Conclusion We identified some important patterns and themes that contribute to the building of community resilience if implemented within a community development framework. We also found that that the Our Amazing Place Treasure Hunt event is grounded in sound community development principles as it attempts to build connectedness and social capital within communities thus building community resilience in the process.

    View record details
  • Supporting Language Learning on the Move. An evaluative framework for mobile language learning resources.

    Reinders, Hayo; Pegrum, Mark (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Mobile learning is becoming increasingly common, and mobile learning resources for supporting the teaching and learning of language are now widely available (Pegrum, 2014). There is, however, little systematic research into their benefits, with most publications reporting case studies of pilots or trials, and data largely consisting of learners’ and teachers’ perceptions (Burston, 2013). As useful as these studies are, they do not necessarily help teachers to identify those aspects of mobile resources that can make a significant pedagogical contribution in particular learning contexts. This chapter presents a framework for evaluating mobile-assisted language learning (MALL) resources, which may take the form of web services or apps (or collections of websites or apps), referred to here as mobile materials; or which may take the form of activities designed around websites or apps, referred to here as mobile activities. In both cases, the websites and apps may either have a dedicated language learning focus or be generic in nature. After a discussion of the nature of mobile hardware and software, we consider the evaluation of MALL resources, which in fact means an evaluation of the learning design of those resources. We present five categories according to which their learning design may be evaluated, namely the use of the affordances of the devices, general pedagogical approaches, specific L2 pedagogical approaches, second language acquisition (SLA) principles, and affective principles. We synthesise these points into an evaluative framework that can be used by practitioners to appraise particular MALL resources or even guide their own production of such resources.

    View record details
  • Thesis review : the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand

    Henson, Donna (2015-11-17)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the second of the Theses Review series Dr Donna Henson reviews the work of Elizabeth Revell. ‘This thesis presents an interesting and thoughtful autoethnographic inquiry into the manifestation of race in everyday communication interactions in New Zealand. An uncommon choice of both topic and method in the local communication disciplinary context, Revell presents a partial collaborative autoethnographic approach to the study that entails the reflexive analysis of qualitative data drawn from solicited participant diaries, semi-structured interviews and focus groups.’

    View record details
  • Baetsch in the city - Vienna, Austria

    Woodruffe, Paul; Klasz, Walter (2012-09)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The objectives were to create a building that at once is both familiar and strange, and to use materials gathered by the local people from the surrounding environment and to use this process to facilitate storytelling and dialog through the discovery of common ground. Place: Nietzchplatz, Sandleiten, Ottakring, Vienna, Austria

    View record details
  • Research-informed teaching of adults : a worthy alternative to old habits and hearsay?

    Benseman, John (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    How and why teachers teach the way they do is central to understanding the impact of education on learners. While many professions have integrated research findings into their practitioners’ practice, education’s record is less consistent in this respect. This paper outlines the case for teachers to become research-informed in their teaching (RIT). It firstly considers what is involved in being research-informed, what types of research are most relevant, why it warrants consideration as well as issues associated with it. It then reviews RIT in the New Zealand context and particularly in relation to teaching adults. Finally, the paper looks at how an RIT approach might be implemented.

    View record details
  • Training actors in a research theatre company context: A practical analysis of the internal structure of a permanent actor’s laboratory in New Zealand

    Ilgenfritz, Pedro (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Network, interactive wind generation – Mairaki Downs, Rangiora

    Leaver, Jonathan (2010-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • An investigation into the success of in-clinic animal behaviour therapy

    Dale, Arnja (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Landscape for life - An investigation of opportunities for aesthetic improvement and biodiversity enhancement for living roofs in New Zealand

    Davies, Renee (2010)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Living roofs offer an opportunity to bring conservation into a contemporary context integrated within urban landscapes. Once neglected and under-utilized roof landscapes can now become biodiverse enclaves of indigenous flora and fauna. The microhabitat variables required for lizards, including temperature, humidity, refuge/shelter and prey, on New Zealand’s first fully indigenous extensive living roof have been studied over three years. Temperature and humidity data from a known lizard site has been used to assess the suitability of the living roof in conjunction with a comparison of insects monitored on the living roof and a literature review of lizard diet. This data has provided the research team (an interdisciplinary team of ecologists, landscape architects and product designers) with the parameters needed to develop, prototype and field-test a prosthetic habitat that provides enhanced conditions on the living roof for lizards. Results from stage 1 indicate a New Zealand indigenous extensive living roof plant community can provide the basic microhabitat variables required to support lizards with the exception of humidity. Although existing vegetation will provide refuge from predators and modifies temperature and humidity, the designed prosthetic habitat creates humid micro-sites (refuges), allowing a trial translocation of native skinks. The results of stage 1 have are now providing a solid basis for stage 2 of the research which has met with Department of Conservation approval in principle (meeting held in February), for the progression to a permit for a trial relocation of skinks onto the living roof. Project highlights: Working with product design researchers and students to brainstorm the prosthetic habitat concept. Feedback from International conference which confirmed some of our preliminary results on living roof environmental conditions and emphasised the International relevance of the research. A field visit to Shakespear Regional Park where the prosthetic habitats were put into the field and seeing evidence of lizard use of the habitats.

    View record details
  • Home science graduates : Carnegie and beyond

    Collins, Jenny (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Domestics

    Jotti, Dorina (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Highlights • ‘Domestics’ exhibition at Unitec’s Snowwhite Gallery. • Catalogues distributed during the exhibition. • Discussions related to the exhibition theme were a valuable component throughout the time of the exhibition • Interest from other tertiary institutions to exhibit the work. Conclusion Work exhibited and accompanying written material achieved desired dialogues and further encourages ongoing discussions about the role of ‘gendered’ art in contemporary practice.

    View record details
  • Breeding biology of laughing kookaburra (Dacelo novaeguinea) in New Zealand

    Perrott, John (2011)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In the last year we have identified six nesting areas from which we have collected nest debris and behavioural observations. From this data we have identified all animal remains within the debris. In addition, we identified the New Zealand kookaburra population range margins and distribution. We have tested tracking methods and conducted nest site protection measures at the six breeding sites (e.g., protecting kookaburra nesting sites from possum damage). We have developed and distributed media and public information packs to private land owners north of Auckland and on Kawau Island to gain access to private lands used by kookaburra. To date, we have all the prerequisite information required to apply for additional external research grants and publish one paper on kookaburra nest debris and predation of native species in New Zealand forests.

    View record details
  • Reprogramming Sunnynook as an urban transport node

    Kaza, Krystina (2009)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details
  • A more sustainable hull form

    Wilson, Richard; Chiappini, Cristiana; Flitta, Isaac (2011-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of the project was to find a planing powerboat hull form capable of being pushed through the water more easily than existing hull forms and yet which still maintains, or even improves on practical performance factors such as sea keeping ability, stability, and directional stability. The speed most suited to test our hull shape is in the speed range 25 knots and under, a practical range for the general power boating public. There is some education required to have the power boating public understand the economy advantage of not carrying more power/weight than necessary.

    View record details
  • The management of transit zone economies: Perceptions and realities

    Simpson, Ken (2009-01-01)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    View record details