541 results for Unclassified

  • Focus on Fiji: GIS Mapping to Support Conservation Planning

    Winder, Linton; Aguilar, Glenn (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In collaboration with the Institute of Applied Science of the University of the South Pacific in Suva, Fiji, the project conducted research on the development of a Geographic Information System for biodiversity conservation, development planning and environmental management. The objectives of the research include the characterization of the spatial distribution of key organisms that are of conservation interest, the determination of the effects of environmental perturbations such as climate change and contributing models that support mitigation strategies and conservation prioritization.

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  • Pacific peoples and tertiary education: issues of participation

    Benseman, John; Anae, Melani; Anderson, Helen; Coxon, Eve (2002)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research study was, therefore, to gather qualitative information on the actual and perceived barriers to participation in tertiary education and training for Pacific peoples. The study had a particular mission to develop an understanding of the experiences and perceptions of Pacific communities, in order to inform future policies aimed at addressing barriers to Pacific people’s participation in tertiary education and training. Specific areas for the project to investigate included: • current participation patterns and steps taken in different tertiary education institutions to identify and remove barriers; • the views of Pacific peoples who have participated successfully in tertiary education, those who have participated but not completed their studies, and those who have not participated in tertiary education; and • the views of a range of Pacific community members, including the families of potential students as to why some have succeeded and the barriers to students’ participation. The following assumptions were made in designing the research: • that ‘tertiary education’ includes universities, polytechnics, colleges of education and private training establishments (PTEs); • that Pacific peoples can enter tertiary education both as school-leavers and as mature-age adults, and that the research needs to address these groups as taking different routes with different accompanying issues; • that the term ‘Pacific peoples’ contains considerable cultural and historical diversity which will need to be addressed in appropriate ways by the researchers; and • that there are already in existence successful programmes and strategies in this area and that it is important to document and analyse these success stories as part of this project

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  • Yes, we do need evidence to show whether Te Whāriki is effective : a reply to Anne Smith’s discussion paper, “Does Te Whāriki need evidence to show it is effective?”

    Blaiklock, Ken (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Te Whāriki, the New Zealand Early Childhood Curriculum, was released in 1996. Since that time, it has been widely praised by academics and teachers in this country and beyond. Although there is much to admire in the aspirations of the document, a number of important concerns have been raised about its efficacy. These concerns were noted as part of a presentation I gave to the Ministry of Education on October 23, 2013, “Early Childhood Education and Care in New Zealand: A Closer Look at the Evidence”. (A copy of the powerpoint slides from the presentation is attached as an appendix.)

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  • Press, politics and people in Papua New Guinea 1950-1975

    Cass, Philip (2014-05-29)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    [PNG] newspapers show an expatriate population expressing attitudes that were often at variance with official policy and out of sympathy with the needs of the indigenous population. It sometimes shows us what the indigenous population thought and did, but just as often their omission from the pages of the daily or weekly press leaves us to draw our own conclusions. From this we can trace an outline, at least of the changing relationship between the sinabada and the haus meri and the taubada and the haus boi. (The fact that an expatriate couple might be addressed as sinabada and taubada in Papua, but as masta and missis in New Guinea did not change the fact that the meri and haus boi remained just that.) Relationships between expatriates and indigenes did change in the period covered by this book; indeed a seismic shift in power, in attitudes and in relationships between expatriate and indigenous people occurred during these two decades. This book draws on the commercial and church press - and, to a certain extent, official and mission publications - to draw a picture of how those changes occurred and what they meant to the country. The press can be a valuable source for historians, not just as a first draft of history, but as a means of understanding the day to day lives of citizens and their concerns. This is particularly true when a newspaper serves a small community. Stuart’s history of Port Moresby, for instance, is all the better because he uses the Papuan Courier to show what the expatriate community was doing and thinking. In the current narrative the Rabaul Times will serve as just such a mirror of a small expatriate population. The press also provides valuable insights into particular episodes and processes as well as broad historical periods. The Post-Courier provides an example of a paper which reported on local stories that often had national significance in a time of unprecedented social and political change in the Territory. Wantok provides us, across a five year period, the application of the media to promote health, education, human development and national identity.

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  • The Moveable Feast Collective Teach Design

    Jowsey, Susan (2014-11-20)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this new eMedia project is to review aspects of the decision making with regards to teaching design and the pedagogical framework employed. Moveable Feast attempted a complex cross disciplinary research based project that encompassed two disciplines and incorporated seventy students drawn from both the first and second years of a three year Design and Visual Arts degree. The Graphic Design staff members lead by Susan Jowsey sought to create a controlled live-learning experience for their students; the city of Christchurch became the case study for this project

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  • The Participation of Women Employed in Traditionally Male Dominated Occupations including Plumbing: 1975 – 2013

    Cruickshank, Garry (2015-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Author Garry Cruickshank investigates the gender gap in New Zealand’s plumbing profession. Having established that the proportion of female plumbers is almost unchanged since 1975, Cruickshank compares this information with data gathered from other trades and exposes the widespread nature of this trend across traditionally male dominated industries. The author reflects on what could to be done to alter this situation.

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  • Rosebank: Cabbages, Horses and Science – a short film on 3 Rosebank stories

    Woodruffe, Paul (2014-09-10)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    eMedia publication documenting three examples of the Rosebank Peninsula’s remaining past uncovered using film by the everyday collective laboratory.

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  • The unstable city : heritage and agency

    Budgett, Jeanette; Kaza, Krystina; McDonald, Allan (2013-06-19)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The Unstable City engages with questions of Auckland’s architectural heritage and draws attention to the potential widespread loss of buildings. The immediate prompt for the publication was the series of devastating earthquakes in Christchurch New Zealand during 2010 and 2011. Auckland’s seismic vulnerability and burgeoning growth projections specifically threaten older buildings. This project champions their value and signals their precarious status. Please note that this is interactive publication and is best viewed in Acrobat Reader. Readers will need to click on the right hand corner (it will turn like a book page). You may need to download this publication first.

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  • Preface. In Communication issues in Aotearoa New Zealand: a collection of research essays.

    Bossio, Diana (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The aim of this collection is to showcase Unitec’s Department of Communication engagement with contemporary communications issues and this collection presents a rich and diverse response. From questions of race, multiculturalism and cultural politics, to case studies discussing questions of digital accessibility, governance and organisational communications, the research highlights a specifically New Zealand context, but is applicable to global understandings of communications.

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  • Public relations in New Zealand - the missing pieces

    Trenwith, Lynne (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Modern practitioners of public relations in New Zealand work in diverse areas of communication (PRINZ, 2006, 2011) but the different areas of practice and the skills that each area employs have developed from the early years of public relations activity; from its origins in the two separate yet related strands of tikanga Māori and press agentry. The press agentry strand has been documented by Trenwith (2010) as the occupation emerged from its war time press agentry and propaganda practices to that of the more modern public relations practices. But missing from the New Zealand public relations history discourse is representation that addresses and integrates Māori and Pacific Island public relations ontological and epistemological assumptions.

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  • All the suffering on our backs : rugby, religion and redemption amid the ruins

    Cass, Philip (2014-12-22)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    New Zealand’s All Black rugby team is a national icon, an affirmation of the manly, self-reliant and resilient virtues which New Zealanders like to think they possess. In times of national peril, economic uncertainty and disaster they remain a pillar of certainty and inspiration, present in almost every television news bulletin and daily newspaper. At other times the All Blacks – whether current players or not - have also provided the media with a frame of reference for explaining significant international events to New Zealand audiences. In 2011 the All Blacks were used prominently to report on the Christchurch earthquake and the much greater seismic devastation experienced in Japan. However, as the Rugby World Cup approached both New Zealand and international media also began to invest the performance of rugby players with a quasi-religious expectation that they would somehow provide catharsis and healing for the earthquake victims in New Zealand and Japan. In doing so they reflected processes that had occurred elsewhere, notably in New Orleans after Cyclone Katrina, the 1995 Rugby World Cup in South Africa and London after the July 2007 terrorist attacks. Rugby has been described as a religion in New Zealand. It is certainly an obsession. Located on the fringes of the north Antarctic and exercising little global economic, political or military influence, New Zealand constantly seeks to mark a space for itself on the world stage through sport. Despite the success of its sportsmen and women in a variety of competitions, rugby remains the central, if not the driving force, in New Zealand sport and in its quest for global recognition. New Zealand’s national team, the All Blacks, is freighted with all sorts of social, cultural and quasi-political expectations.

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  • Emerging technologies in New Zealand: A pedagogical framework for mobile social media

    Cochrane, Thomas Donald; Narayan, Vickel; Oldfield, James (2015)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    In this chapter we critique three mlearning case studies in a variety of higher education contexts illustrating how mlearning can enable authentic learning. Drawing on these experiences we explore how collaborative curriculum design can practically implement authentic mobile learning. Applying the nine principles of authentic learning to the context of mlearning has led us to identify six critical success factors for implementing mobile learning and has resulted in the development of a mobile social media framework for implementing authentic learning. We conclude that mobile learning can be a powerful catalyst for enabling authentic learning. Emerging technologies in New Zealand: A pedagogical framework for mobile social media - ResearchGate. Available from: http://www.researchgate.net/publication/268078730_Emerging_technologies_in_New_Zealand_A_pedagogical_framework_for_mobile_social_media [accessed May 28, 2015].

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  • Social cohesion and free home internet in New Zealand

    Williams, Jocelyn (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter discusses community outcomes of free home Internet access. It draws on case study re-search on Computers in Homes (CIH), a scheme established in New Zealand in 2000 for the purpose of bridging the digital divide, particularly for low-income families who have school-aged children. The government-funded CIH scheme aims to strengthen relationships between families and schools, improve educational outcomes for children, and provide greater opportunities for their parents. CIH achieves this by working with many primary (elementary) schools, each of which selects 25 families who will benefit from the program. Each family receives a refurbished computer, software, and six months free Internet,as well as twenty hours of free IT training and technical support so that all adults are equipped to make effective use of the Internet. The scheme has evolved to deliver much more than technology. It has becomes a contributor to social capital in the communities where it has been established. This chapter uses a case study research approach to demonstrate and theorize this process of community building using a construct of social cohesion, which appears to be strengthened by the CIH intervention. Where stronger social networks, volunteerism, and civic engagement were documented in the research, leader figures also mobilized to act on shared goals. These findings highlight the value of existing social resources within communities for achieving community goals while also maximizing community Internet longevity.

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  • Cultural Identity and the City - Auckland, NZ and Wismar

    Schnoor, Christoph (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    What forms the cultural identity of a city? As architectural historian and theorist, I will apply this question to the “Baukultur”, this German term, on the one hand heavily loaded and on the other hand virtually impossible to translate. “Baukultur” stands for a culture of architecture and the built environment in its entirety. Thus I will ask: how can the identity of a city be defined via its built culture? This notion of Baukultur is less narrow in its definition than one would most likely expect to see in Wismar, a town so heavily focussed on its status as UNESCO World Heritage. Is not the city as a whole in its built development a testimony to past and present architectural culture? If this is so, a discussion of built culture needs to be geared to what has marked and continues to mark the development of a city, rather than asking for the ‘beautiful’ constituents of the city. As Aldo Rossi did in his 1966 Architecture of the City, we will follow the notion of typology as defining element and of the ‘tessuto’, the fabric as a quasi-sculptural basic element of the city. Please allow me to answer the question regarding built culture via a brief investigation of Auckland, hoping that this may stimulate reflections on this very question in Wismar.

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  • Autonomous language learning study guides : Useful tools in the self-access language learning environment.

    Dofs, Kerstin; Hobbs, Moira (2014)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This paper reports on a recent trial of Autonomous Language Learning (ALL) guides, at Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology (CPIT), in Christchurch and Unitec Institute of Technology in Auckland, New Zealand. The guides were developed to meet a perceived need for autonomous learning support in both the language classroom and the Self-Access Centre (SAC). The aim was to investigate whether these guides were effective in fostering autonomy and enhancing learning for students during their out-of-class time. Furthermore, it evaluated how they were being used, what learning was taking place, and if they fulfilled the need for support that teachers and students may require.

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  • Adult education : New Zealand, to 2012

    Benseman, John (2013-11-07)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Adult education, New Zealand, to 2012. In its broadest sense, adult education refers to the education of anyone beyond school-age. Historically, the sector has constantly evolved as elements of its provision have matured into autonomous sectors in their own right, leaving adult education to constantly re-invent itself on the boundaries of the educational mainstream in its mission of meeting adult learner needs. Maori education, Colonial adult education, Workers’ Educational Association (WEA), After World War I, Depression and World War II, Council of Adult Education, Including new populations in adult education - Maori, Women, From the mid-twentieth century, Reorganisation from the 1970s, Challenges of neoliberal policy and Global Financial Crisis, Significance of adult education in New Zealand.

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  • Children Witnessing Parental Violence: A Social Worker from Aotearoa/New Zealand Responds, response within Case study #1:Children witnessing parental violence

    Keddell, Emily; Pukepuke, Tepora (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Social work within each national context is complex and multifaceted—Aotearoa/New Zealand (A/NZ) is no different. Social workers fulfill a vast array of roles ranging from care to control, from agent of the state to activist, from educator to health promoter to family worker. The role of “social worker” has public, sanitized,and carefully delineated definitions made by professional associations, registration boards, and agency-based role descriptions, yet these often belie the underlying rubric of inconsistencies, power dynamics, tensions,and complexities of actual practice. Thus, it’s difficult to state with authority what a typical social worker would do in regard to this case study, as other A/NZ social workers may dispute the version of the “truth” about what actions a social worker might take in this case. Given these general caveats, the presentation here is one possible response within the A/NZ setting to the case study of Amina.

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  • Walking the talk in social work education.

    Napan, Ksenija (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    This chapter focuses on the benefits and challenges of utilising social work values and principles when teaching, researching, evaluating and improving social work education. These values and principles are explored through their application within the social practice degree programmes at Unitec, New Zealand. A range of alternative and novel teaching and assessment methods are examined and evaluated in the light of their relevance and compatibility with social work education. Special focus is placed on, group assignments, creative individual assignments, field trips, experiential learning, self and peer reflection, inquiry learning, the use of individualised learning contracts and their relevance in ‘walking the talk’ in social work education. In an attempt to ‘walk the talk’ this chapter is organized in similar stages to the way in which social work education is organized in Aotearoa New Zealand and it integrates personal, professional and political discourses relevant for the co-creation of competent social workers.

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  • Does ethnicity influence the choice of language learning strategies?

    Mizutani, Satomi; Dallow, Tomoko (2013)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Introduction There has been very little research on learning strategies used by learners of Japanese as a foreign language (Grainger 2006). Furthermore, ethnicity has not attracted much attention as an influential variable in such studies (Grainger 1997). The study This study aims to fill the gap by investigating the types of learning strategies used by learners of Japanese in New Zealand and the relationship between their use of learning strategies and their ethnicity. The research questions of this study were: (1) what types of learning strategies are reportedly used by learners of the Japanese language as a foreign language?; and (2) to what extent does the use of language learning strategies vary depending on learners’ ethnicity?

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  • Biologically Inspired Techniques for Data Mining: A Brief Overview of Particle Swarm Optimization for KDD. Alam

    Shafiq, Alam; Gillian, Dobbie; Koh, Yun Sing; Rehman, Saeed (2014-02-02)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    Knowledge Discovery and Data (KDD) mining helps uncover hidden knowledge in huge amounts of data. However, recently, different researchers have questioned the capability of traditional KDD techniques to tackle the information extraction problem in an efficient way while achieving accurate results when the amount of data grows. One of the ways to overcome this problem is to treat data mining as an optimization problem. Recently, a huge increase in the use of Swarm Intelligence (SI)-based optimization techniques for KDD has been observed due to the flexibility, simplicity, and extendibility of these techniques to be used for different data mining tasks. In this chapter, the authors overview the use of Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO), one of the most cited SI-based techniques in three different application areas of KDD, data clustering, outlier detection, and recommender systems. The chapter shows that there is a tremendous potential in these techniques to revolutionize the process of extracting knowledge from big data using these techniques

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