2 results for Working or discussion paper, The Determinants of Career Success in the New Zealand Accountancy Profession

  • The Determinants of Career Success in the New Zealand Accountancy Profession

    Whiting, Rosalind H (2008-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Sixty-nine experienced New Zealand Chartered Accountants (CAs), displaying varying levels of family/work involvement were interviewed about their careers. The primary finding was that those with the least family responsibilities, irrespective of gender, were the most successful career-wise. Overall career success was enhanced by high career aspirations, long working hours and availability to clients, hard work, high technical competence and skills, networking, self-confidence, flexibility to relocate if required and large size and growth of the employing organisation. Most influential were career aspirations and a long hours/available work ethic, demonstrating the pervasiveness of the male linear career model. Career aspirations, desire for responsibility, perceived ability to handle pressure, long hours, availability to clients, networking and possibly technical skills (in cases of extended leave) were all influenced by the CA’s level of family responsibilities and not just gender alone

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  • The Determinants of Career Success in the New Zealand Accountancy Profession

    Whiting, Rosalind H (2008-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Sixty-nine experienced New Zealand Chartered Accountants (CAs), displaying varying levels of family/work involvement were interviewed about their careers. The primary finding was that those with the least family responsibilities, irrespective of gender, were the most successful career-wise. Overall career success was enhanced by high career aspirations, long working hours and availability to clients, hard work, high technical competence and skills, networking, self-confidence, flexibility to relocate if required and large size and growth of the employing organisation. Most influential were career aspirations and a long hours/available work ethic, demonstrating the pervasiveness of the male linear career model. Career aspirations, desire for responsibility, perceived ability to handle pressure, long hours, availability to clients, networking and possibly technical skills (in cases of extended leave) were all influenced by the CA’s level of family responsibilities and not just gender alone

    View record details