10 results for Working or discussion paper, Use commercially

  • Foregone profit in the wine industry

    Neuninger, Rosemarie; Mather, Damien William; Duncan, Tara (2015-06-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Background and Aims: Wine awards are frequently used as extrinsic cues for wine categories. The aim of this paper is to show the forgone profit arising from failures to make optimal use of awards when positioning wine brands to consumer segments. Methods and Results: Four award statuses were tested: a well-known award, multiple awards, a fictitious award used as a control (an award without consumer trust) and, no award. Participants tasted eight wine samples: the first four without extrinsic cues; the next four used extrinsic cues with varying award status. Each sample was rated for liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay. Low-involvement consumers’ perceived liking and price willing to pay were improved by multiple (real gold) awards compared to high-involvement consumers. Conclusions: Trust in awards increased the price consumers were willing to pay for wine with an award. For high-involvement consumers who distrusted awards, multiple wine awards and fictitious awards negatively influenced perceived liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay. Significance of the Study: This is the first study to report on the combined influence of wine awards and consumers’ sensory perceptions of wine on perceived liking, likelihood to buy and price willing to pay.

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  • Strategic Issues for GMOs in Primary Production: Key Economic Drivers and Emerging Issues

    Campbell, Hugh; Fitzgerald, Ruth; Saunders, Caroline; Sivak, Leda (2000)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The Warrant of the Royal Commission of Enquiry into Genetic Modification asks a range of questions about the kinds of consequences (health, environmental, legal, cultural, ethical and economic) that might occur should GM technologies be commercially released in New Zealand. These are important questions, as New Zealand is one of only a few countries that rely on food exports to generate a major proportion of national revenue, but which have not yet released GMOs into commercial production of food, fibre or nutriceuticals. Focussing specifically on the economic consequences of commercial GM production, there is clearly both an opportunity for unique economic outcomes that must be considered, and also a series of major methodological challenges surrounding how we might quantify the nature of these opportunities given that such an exercise is entirely predictive (ie. we have no actual commercial production of GMOs to evaluate). This difficulty is evidenced by the level of claims-making taking place about the potential economic value to New Zealand of either avoiding or encouraging GM technologies in commercial production of food, fibre and nutriceuticals. There are clearly few certainties in this discussion. The New York Times reported in 1999 that even Monsanto had hired a group of independent consultants to try and estimate the nature of the biotechnology landscape in several decades time (‘Plotting Corporate Futures: Outlining What Could Go Wrong’ New York Times: 24/6/99). The consultants drew up three scenarios – one reasonably positive, one uncertain and contingent on the outcomes of many unpredictable variables, and one primarily negative for GM food. However, they were unable to recommend which one they considered the most likely to happen. Such caution is scarcely reflected in some of the recent claims-making in public fora about the presumed benefits and disadvantages of either a biotechnologically- driven or GM-free economic future for New Zealand.

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  • The New Zealand sustainability dashboard: unified monitoring and learning for sustainable agriculture in New Zealand

    Moller, Henrik; Barber, Andrew; Saunders, Caroline; MacLeod, Catriona; Rosin, Chris; Lucock, Dave; Post, Elizabeth; Ombler, Franz; Campbell, Hugh; Benge, Jayson; Reid, John; Hunt, Lesley; Hansen, Paul; Carey, Peter; Rotarangi, Stephanie; Ford, Stuart; Barr, Tremane; Manhire, Jon (2012)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The New Zealand Sustainability Dashboard project will develop a sustainability assessment and reporting tool in partnership with five primary industry sectors in New Zealand. Internationally recognised frameworks and their key generic sustainability performance indicators (KPIs) will be co-opted to ensure that overseas consumers can benchmark and verify the sustainability credentials of New Zealand exported products. We will also design New Zealand and sector-specific KPIs to guide farmers and local consumers to best practices of special relevance to New Zealand society, ecology and land care. Monitoring protocols will be described, where possible for the farmers themselves to rapidly score their own performance across economic, social and environmental dimensions of food and fibre production. A multifunctional web application will be created that facilitates uploading of regular monitoring results and instantly summarises and reports back trends to the growers, to industry representatives, and to agriculture regulators and policy makers at regional and national government levels. Tests of the accuracy and statistical reliability of the KPIs will be coupled with ongoing research on how much the farmers use the tool, whether it changes their actions and beliefs for more sustainable agriculture, and whether stakeholders at all levels of global food systems trust and regularly use the tool. The Dashboard will be more than just a compliance and eco-verification tool – it will also provide a hub for learning to become more sustainable. It will create an information ‘clearing house’ for linking past data sources and at least five existing decision-support software applications so that growers can discover optimal choices for improved farming practice, should the Dashboard alert them that their KPIs are approaching amber of red alert thresholds. We will also design and test two new decision-support packages; one enabling farmers to calculate their energy and carbon footprint and how it can best be reduced; and a whole-farm ‘What if’ decision-support package that explores how investment in improving one sustainability KPI (eg. application of nitrogen fertilser) affects another (eg. farm profit). The Sustainability Dashboard will also include customisation capabilities for use in product traceability; for undertaking surveys of users; for estimating the value placed on different aspects of sustainability by growers, industry representatives, regulators and consumers; for comparing Māori and other communities’ values in sustainability assessments; and for identifying market opportunities and constraints. The Dashboard web application will be designed so it can be quickly integrated into an industry’s/sector’s existing IT platform and infrastructure and this will facilitate rapid uptake. Some host industries may force growers to use the Sustainability Dashboard as part of their existing Market Assurance scheme.

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  • Artificial Neural Networks and Aggregate Consumption Patterns in New Zealand

    Farhat, Dan (2012-11)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This study uses artificial neural networks (ANNs) to reproduce aggregate per-capita consumption patterns for the New Zealand economy. Results suggest that non-linear ANNs can outperform a linear econometric model at out-of-sample forecasting. The best ANN at matching in-sample data, however, is rarely the best predictor. To improve the accuracy of ANNs using only in-sample information, methods for combining heterogeneous ANN forecasts are explored. The frequency that an individual ANN is a top performer during in-sample training plays a beneficial role in consistently producing accurate out-of-sample patterns. Possible avenues for incorporating ANN structures into social simulation models of consumption are discussed.

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  • Super Salmon: The Industrialisation of Fish Farming and the Drive Towards GM Technologies in Salmon Production

    Campbell, Hugh; McLeod, Carmen; Grice, Janet; Herleth, Teresa (2006)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This discussion paper argues that there are many complex issues that need to be considered in relation to the intensive farming of salmon in general, and GM salmon, in particular. This paper highlights that animal biotechnology has thus far been dominated by experiments to produce pharmaceutical products, and therefore the production of GM salmon for food presents a radical departure from other animal biotechnologies.

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  • Keen on EVs: Kiwi perspectives on electric vehicles, and opportunities to stimulate uptake

    Ford, Rebecca; Stephenson, Janet; Scott, Michelle; Williams, John; Rees, David; Wooliscroft, Ben (2015-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Copyright The Authors

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  • Amoeba Management: Why it Works at Kyocera and which other Firms Could Benefit from its Adoption - Part 1

    Adler, Ralph W; Hiromoto, Toshiro (2010)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This paper is the first of two articles that explores the workings of amoeba management. Kyocera, a Japanese manufacturer of ceramics and printing-related devices, first introduced amoeba management in the 1960s. On the surface, amoeba management appears very similar to a company’s widespread use of profit centers / pseudo profit centers. Researchers, or at least those who publish in English-language business journals, invariably focus on the issue of organizational structuring, typically relying on highly descriptive business case studies to showcase the use of amoeba management at Kyocera. Missing from the literature has been any attempt to draw upon business theory to help understand how and why amoeba management’s success is achieved. This first paper, which is Part 1 of a two-part series, draws on the fields of organizational sociology and organizational psychology to uncover and identify the implicit set of unifying and coordinating mechanisms that enables Kyocera’s use of a highly, and what some might even call radically, decentralized organizational structure to succeed. The second paper explores which firms are most likely to benefit from amoeba management adoption and identifies the internal and external factors that are likely to promote or prevent its successful adoption.

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  • Excavations on Motupore Island (Vol 1)

    Allen, Jim (2017)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • Excavations on Motupore Island. (Vol 2)

    Allen, Jim (2017)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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  • An Archaeology of Madang Papua New Guinea

    Gaffney, Dylan; Summerhayes, Glenn R. (2017)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

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