67 results for Working or discussion paper, 1996

  • Spatial data acquisition from motion video

    Williams, Mark (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Politics and techniques of data encryption

    Wolfe, Henry B (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Information warfare: where are the threats?

    Wolfe, Henry B (1996-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • GIS maturity and integration

    Marr, Andrew; Benwell, George L (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Connectionist-based information systems: a proposed research theme

    Kasabov, Nikola; Purvis, Martin; Sallis, Philip (1996-02)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    This PDF was created from a converted WordPerfect document. While all reasonable efforts have been made to reproduce the original paper as closely as possible, some formatting in the PDF may vary from the original hard-copy paper.

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  • Data sharing using the X.500 directory

    Pascoe, Richard (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Using genetic algorithms for an optical thin-film learning model

    Li, Xiaodong; Purvis, Martin (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • Using data models to estimate required effort in creating a spatial information system

    Benwell, George L; MacDonell, Stephen (1996-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The creation of spatial information systems can be viewed from many directions. One such view is to see the creation in terms of data collection, data modelling, codifying spatial processes, information management, analysis and presentation. The amount of effort to create such systems is frequently under-estimated; this is true for each aspect of the above view. The accuracy of the assessment of effort will vary for each aspect. This paper concentrates on the effort required to create the code for spatial processes and analysis. Recent experience has indicated that this is an area where considerable under-estimation is occurring. Function point analysis presented in this paper provides a reliable metric for spatial systems developers to assess required effort based on spatial data models.

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  • Measurement of database systems: an empirical study

    MacDonell, Stephen; Shepperd, Martin; Sallis, Philip (1996-08)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    There is comparatively little work, other than function points, that tackles the problem of building prediction systems for software that is dominated by data considerations, in particular systems developed using 4GLs. We describe an empirical investigation of 70 such systems. Various easily obtainable counts were extracted from data models (e.g. number of entities) and from specifications (e.g. number of screens). Using simple regression analysis, prediction systems of implementation size with accuracy of MMRE=21% were constructed. Our work shows that it is possible to develop simple and effective prediction systems based upon metrics easily derived from functional specifications and data models.

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  • Bi-level document image compression using layout information

    Inglis, Stuart J.; Witten, Ian H. (1996-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    Most bi-level images stored on computers today comprise scanned text, and their number is escalating because of the drive to archive large volumes of paper-based material electronically. These documents are stored using generic bi-level image technology, based either on classical run-length coding, such as the CCITT Group 4 method, or on modern schemes such as JBIG that predict pixels from their local image context. However, image compression methods that are tailored specifically for images known to contain printed text can provide noticeably superior performance because they effectively enlarge the context to the character level, at least for those predictions for which such a context is relevant. To deal effectively with general documents that contain text and pictures, it is necessary to detect layout and structural information from the image, and employ different compression techniques for different parts of the image. Such techniques are called document image compression methods.

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  • Maori identity within whanau: A review of literature.

    Moeke-Pickering, Taima Materangatira (1996-01-01)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    The study of identities is an enormous and complex undertaking. Research on identity formation has revealed a clear link between family practices and identity development. In traditional Maori times, the whanau was the place where initial teaching and socialisation of things Maori took place. While there is no single exact measure of what constitutes Maori identity (Durie, 1994), that Maori identity is still being asserted today means that the shaping of Maori identity is still occurring. Rather than attempt to cover all aspects of how Maori shape their identities, I have chosen to focus on the shaping of Maori identity within whanau. Given that this paper is about both Maori identity and whanau identity it seemed logical to review and examine the literature surrounding these two notions. In this paper I also discuss the ecological threats and supports that influenced Maori and whanau identity. Then I review literature on whanau identity from traditional and contemporary works, and explore the concept of whanau identity as a management framework. The literature on whanau does not vary from what Maori authors have expressed regarding their conceptualisations of Maori identity. The tribal structures, descent and cultural practices provide integral pathways through which whanau and Maori identity can be developed and maintained. What is of significance, is that the formation of a secure whanau identity is likely to contribute toward an overall stable Maori identity. Creating an environment where a sense of secure wellbeing among members of a whanau is nurtured, leads to members constructing a whanau and Maori identity that is meaningful to them in their lives.

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  • Learning agents: from user study to implementation

    Maulsby, David; Witten, Ian H. (1996-04)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    Learning agents acquire procedures by being taught rather than programmed. To teach effectively, users prefer communicating in richer and more flexible ways than traditional computer dialogs allow. This paper describes the design, implementation and evaluation of a learning agent. In contrast to most Artificial Intelligence projects, the design centers on a user study, with a human-simulated agent to discover the interactions that people find natural. Our work shows that users instinctively communication via "hints," or partially-specified, ambiguous, instructions. Hints may be input verbally, or by pointing, or by selecting from menus. They may be unsolicited, or arise in response to a query from the agent. We develop a theory of instruction types for an agent to interpret them. The implementation demonstrates that computers can learn from examples and ambiguous hints. Finally, an evaluation reveals the extent to which our system meets the original design requirements.

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  • Coordinating collaborative work in an integrated information systems engineering environment

    Grundy, John C.; Venable, John R.; Mugridge, Warwick B. (1996-03)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    The development of complex Information Systems requires the use of many Information Systems engineering tools. These diverse tools need to be integrated in order to be effectively used by multiple cooperating developers. In addition, the users of these environments require features that facilitate effective cooperation, such as support for collaboratively planning cooperative work, notification of changes to parts of a system under development (but only when necessary or desired), support for keeping aware of other developers' work contexts, and the ability to flexibly engineer or adapt development processes and methods. We describe an integrated Information Systems engineering environment which includes a work coordination tool supporting these requirements.

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  • Understanding what machine learning produces - Part II: Knowledge visualization techniques

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Humphrey, Matthew C.; Witten, Ian H. (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    Researchers in machine learning use decision trees, production rules, and decision graphs for visualizing classification data. Part I of this paper surveyed these representations, paying particular attention to their comprehensibility for non-specialist users. Part II turns attention to knowledge visualization—the graphic form in which a structure is portrayed and its strong influence on comprehensibility. We analyze the questions that, in our experience, end users of machine learning tend to ask of the structures inferred from their empirical data. By mapping these questions onto visualization tasks, we have created new graphical representations that show the flow of examples through a decision structure. These knowledge visualization techniques are particularly appropriate in helping to answer the questions that users typically ask, and we describe their use in discovering new properties of a data set. In the case of decision trees, an automated software tool has been developed to construct the visualizations.

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  • Understanding what machine learning produces - Part I: Representations and their comprehensibility

    Cunningham, Sally Jo; Humphrey, Matthew C.; Witten, Ian H. (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Waikato

    The aim of many machine learning users is to comprehend the structures that are inferred from a dataset, and such users may be far more interested in understanding the structure of their data than in predicting the outcome of new test data. Part I of this paper surveys representations based on decision trees, production rules and decision graphs that have been developed and used for machine learning. These representations have differing degrees of expressive power, and particular attention is paid to their comprehensibility for non-specialist users. The graphic form in which a structure is portrayed also has a strong effect on comprehensibility, and Part II of this paper develops knowledge visualization techniques that are particularly appropriate to help answer the questions that machine learning users typically ask about the structures produced.

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  • Spatial databases—creative future concepts and use

    Benwell, George L (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • FuNN/2—a fuzzy neural network architecture for adaptive learning and knowledge acquisition

    Kasabov, Nikola; Kim, Jaesoo; Watts, Michael; Gray, Andrew (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text.

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  • First experiences in implementing a spatial metadata repository

    Cockcroft, Sophie (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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  • Early experiences in measuring multimedia systems development effort

    Fletcher, Tim; MacDonell, Stephen; Wong, B L William (1996-10)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    The development of multimedia information systems must be managed and controlled just as it is for other generic system types. This paper proposes an approach for assessing multimedia component and system characteristics with a view to ultimately using these features to estimate the associated development effort. Given the different nature of multimedia systems, existing metrics do not appear to be entirely useful in this domain; however, some general principles can still be applied in analysis. Some basic assertions concerning the influential characteristics of multimedia systems are made and a small preliminary set of data is evaluated.

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  • Incorporating a new computational reasoning approach to spatial modelling

    Holt, Alec (1996-12)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Part of the GeoComputation '96 Special Issue 96/25; follow the "related link" to download the entire collection as a single document.

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