26 results for 1920, Masters

  • The history of the early gold discoveries in the Province of Otago, 1851-1863.

    Jefcoate, Harold Oliver (1922)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Bibliography missing.

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  • The Southland province of New Zealand in the days of Dr. J.A.R. Menzies (Superintendent, 1861-1864).

    Dreaver, A. R. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    59 leaves, [25] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 25 cm.

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  • New Zealand State advances office

    Johnston, John George (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 77 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • A preliminary inquiry into the general effects of attendance at moving pictures by children of Dunedin

    McQueen, Henry Charles (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Thesis (M.A. in Education) - University of Otago. 64 leaves ; 27 cm. Code word: Almost.

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  • Imagery and teaching method : an inquiry into the significance of mental imagery in the teaching of school subjects.

    Wells, Robert Bromby (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The training of farmers, being an enquiry into the organisation of agricultural instruction in Canterbury.

    Innes, Reginald Munro (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Time economy in silent reading : an inquiry as to the best time conditions for children to study by reading.

    Mackay, Duncan (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • An investigation into the three component system, zinc oxide, hydrochloric acid, zinc chloride and water

    Holland, A. C. (1928)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Zinc Hydrogen or oxide is soluble in an aqueous solution of zinc chloride, and when a concentrated solution is diluted with water, a basic salt, an oxychloride of zinc is precipitated. The Formation of zinc oxychloride is also effected by adding water to solid zinc chloride or by diluting a concentrated solution of zinc chloride. An examination of the literature showed that up to the present time about sixteen different oxychlorides of zinc have been described by various workers. Writing the molecular ratio in the order ZnO: ZnCl₂: H₂O, the following compounds have been reported:-

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  • The newspaper as a public service : forty years of "The Lyttelton Times", Christchurch, New Zealand.

    Bain, Donald William (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    At a time when, in Canterbury, journalism has risen to the dignity of an academic career, when it represents and moulds the public opinion which makes and unmakes governments, it may be fitting to enquire into the origins and the early development in journalistic and political spheres of the newspaper, which, founded by the earliest colonists, has developed its functions side by side with the general progress of the Province.

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  • An inquiry into the use of clerical tests for the differentiation of school children.

    Lee, Allan Frederick (1928)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • A regional survey.

    Noonan, Albert Leslie Royston (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • An investigation into the variation with temperature of the normal electrode potential of zinc and of the activity coefficients of zinc sulphate solutions

    Moffat, J. F. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    When two metals each dipping into a solution of one of its salts are joined together in the form of a circuit, a current flows between them. This fact although noted by Volta has so far resisted all attempts to interpret it convincingly. Volta explained the course of this electric current on the theory of contact potential difference. Faraday on the other hand put forward the theory that the current was merely the electrical energy produced by the chemical changes taking place in the cell. Later experiments have formulated theories embracing both of these points of view but still unanimity has not been reached. Probably the most outstanding of the determinations made was that due to Nernst. It is now well known how the gas laws were applied to liquid and solutions through the discovery of the Osmotic Pressure of liquids.

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  • A study of the transformation temperature of sulphur by means of X-ray diffraction photographs

    Simmers, R. G. (1928)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    On July 6th, 1826 Mitscherlich presented to the Berlin Academy his outstanding crystallographic paper, in which he announced his discovery that one of the best known of chemical elements, Sulphur, was capable of crystallising in two distinct forms belonging to the rhombic and monoclinic systems respectively. Other, but less important crystalline forms of sulphur exist or have since been discovered (Gernez 13; Lowry 47; Friedel 8; Engel 21; Wilkinson 60; Smith and Carson 45), while in addition there have been isolated at least two forms of amorphous sulphur and one form of colloidal (21). The two forms due to Mitscherlich and their main properties will first be treated in detail.

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  • The physical constants of kauri gum

    Macky, W. A. (1924)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Kauri Gum is the fossilised resin of the Kauri Tree (Agathis Australis). The tree which often attains great size is found only in the Auckland Province, and the fossil gum is found embedded beneath the surface of the soil in open country on the sites of ancient forests. The gum is located by probing with long spears, and is then dug out. It is largely used in the manufacture of high class varnishes and linoleums. There is a large range of colour - from dark, almost black gum, that has evidently been subject in times gone by to the action of forest fires, to clear white, invaluable for certain descriptions of Varnishes. The pieces collected vary from small "chips" to the size of large flint stones and very occasionally lumps up to 50 lbs are found. Most of the gum obtained to-day is of the chip variety and considerable labour is involved in separating it from its surrounding earth. The gum used in these experiments was cut from a block weighing about three pounds, consisting of the best quality gum. As far as could be ascertained only one previous attempt has been made to determine any of the physical constants of the gum and then not even approximate results were obtained. This research was designed primarily to measure: (1) Resistivity (2) Surface Resistance (3) Dielectric Constant These three are of importance in connection with the possible electrical separation of the chip gum from impurities. Several methods are in use on the gum fields for separating the gum from clay and soils, but none give very good results. Since this research was started an English company has patented an electrostatic method of separation and intends to use it on their gum fields in North Auckland. The Refractive index and Specific Heat of the gum were also measured.

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  • A history of Presbyterianism and the Presbyterian Church in Canterbury

    Gray, Enid E. (1924)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A History of the Presbyterian Church of Canterbury has not hitherto been attempted, except for three chapters on the Early Days in Christchurch, North Canterbury and South Canterbury, in the Rev. J. Dickson's book, The History of the New Zealand Presbyterian Church, which was published in 1899. Jubilee booklets of St. Andrew's and St. Paul's give brief outlines of the story of their development; but otherwise the ground broken in this research has been quite new.

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  • A group of xerophytic ferns of the Port Hills, Canterbury

    Morrison, M. K. C. (1923)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Projecting from the East Coast of the South Island of New Zealand is a peninsula known as Banks Peninsula. (Fig. 1.) Cutting deep into the land on the northern side, is the Lyttleton Harbour, (Fig. 2 and 3.) surrounded on three sides, by a horse-shoe shaped range of hills (Fig 3.) The portion of this range that separates Port Lyttleton from the city and suburbs of Christchurch, is known as the Port Hills. (Fig 4.) Banks Peninsula has a characteristic vegetation, not the least interesting part of which is its fern flora. On the Port Hills in particular, are to be found many interesting forms. Certain of these ferns, growing on spurs and valleys of the hills in the vegetation of Christchurch, have been investigated by the author. It is the main object of this paper to give a general account, morphological, anatomical, and ecological, of these ferns, together with a brief summary of the general fern vegetation of Banks Peninsula and the Port Hills. The species under special consideration are: Cheilanthes sieberi, Kunze; Nothoclaena distans, R. Br; Pleurosorus rutaefolius, Fee; Anogramme leptophylla, Link; Gymnogramme rutaefolia, Hook and Grev.; Gymnogramme leptophylla, Desv.

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  • The history of the first New Zealand Parliament : being an account of the two houses of the Legislature, 1854-5

    Pierre, Bill (1923)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Research on the electrometric determination of the hydrolysis of salts by means of the hydrogen electrode and of the quin-hydrone electrode, with special reference to the anomalous behaviour of solutions of zinc sulphate

    Marris, N. A. (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Many methods have been described for the determination of the degree of hydrolysis of salts. The following may be given as examples of the more important of these:- (I) Measurement of the rate of inversion of sugar. (II) Measurement of the rate of Saponification of Ethyl, or Methyl Acetate (III) Determination of Electrical Conductivity (IV) Electrometric determination of Hydrogen ion concentration by Hydrogen Electrode (V) Determination of Freezing Point (VI) Distillation of Solutions (VII) Dilatometric considerations (VIII) Solubility of Carbonates in water in atmosphere of Carbon Dioxide (IX) Partition of base between two immiscible solvents (X) Measurement of Heats of Neutralisation (XI) Measurement of the Motion Ions (XII) Decomposition of diazoacetic aster by hydrogen ions.

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  • An Introduction to the Natural History of the Heathcote Estuary and New Brighton Beach, Canterbury - New Zealand. A Study in Littoral Ecology

    Thompson, Ernest F. (1926)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Ever since Marine Ecology began to take its place as a section of Biological Research, divergent views have been held as to the limits of marine and supra-marine regions; particularly is this so with regard to the fixation of the boundary between littoral and sub-littoral regions. Thus Murray(1898) defines littoral as down to 20 fathoms, while Flattely and Walton(1922) in their devision of plant zones, consider this lower boundary to be at low-water mark. Sernander(1927) applies the degree and nature of exposure as a principle of division. On his principle the boundary between littoral and sub-littoral would coincide with the lower limit of intermittent exposure.

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  • The history of early Lyttelton from a social aspect

    Hunter, Margaret (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Half way down the east coast of New Zealand’s’ South Island there is a large peninsula, well wooded and indented with lovely bays and inlets full of shadow and sunlight. But in the matter of harbours and anchorage Nature has been liberal to little purpose. On the southern side there is a sheltered harbour, but mountain-locked; on the east, several bay divided from the plains country by miles of precipitous ridges; and on the north lie two far-flung harbours with common headland between them, the upper one much larger and running deeply into the land where the peninsula joins the mainland. These two harbours are alike in that they are bare of bush and woodland except for scattered remnants in little mountainous ravines or single patches clinging in odd places to the frowning rocks. They are alike, too, in the half rugged, half velvet appearance of the mountains that rise steeply from their waters, green in spring but mostly tawny colour that holds the varying atmospheric transformations and takes on added hues with the sunrise and the sunset, with the mist or with the clouds. The lower harbour is not more than half the length of the other, and much narrower; it is studded with small bays, not as a rule of a very decisive character, and one small island about three quarters of the way down almost touches a small promontory. The harbour is roughly a long narrow gulf with little variation on width except a slight narrowing at the head and a corresponding widening at the mouth.

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