41 results for 1920

  • The history of the early gold discoveries in the Province of Otago, 1851-1863.

    Jefcoate, Harold Oliver (1922)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Bibliography missing.

    View record details
  • The Southland province of New Zealand in the days of Dr. J.A.R. Menzies (Superintendent, 1861-1864).

    Dreaver, A. R. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    59 leaves, [25] leaves of plates :ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 25 cm.

    View record details
  • New Zealand State advances office

    Johnston, John George (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 77 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

    View record details
  • The geology of the Malvern Hills, with map and sections, panoramic sketches, and photographs.

    Speight, R; Page, S (1928)


    University of Canterbury Library

    View record details
  • An Inquiry into the mortality from diabetes mellitus in New Zealand, along with some observations and remarks on the Allen treatment of diabetes mellitus.

    Hall, John William (1920)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    Date unknown (circa 1920-1930). Code name: Abettor.

    View record details
  • A preliminary inquiry into the general effects of attendance at moving pictures by children of Dunedin

    McQueen, Henry Charles (1927)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Thesis (M.A. in Education) - University of Otago. 64 leaves ; 27 cm. Code word: Almost.

    View record details
  • Calendar 1928

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1928)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1926

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1926)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1923

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1923)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1925

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1925)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1922

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1922)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1921

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1921)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1927

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1927)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1920

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1920)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1929

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1929)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • Calendar 1924

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1924)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    View record details
  • An investigation into the variation with temperature of the normal electrode potential of zinc and of the activity coefficients of zinc sulphate solutions

    Moffat, J. F. (1929)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    When two metals each dipping into a solution of one of its salts are joined together in the form of a circuit, a current flows between them. This fact although noted by Volta has so far resisted all attempts to interpret it convincingly. Volta explained the course of this electric current on the theory of contact potential difference. Faraday on the other hand put forward the theory that the current was merely the electrical energy produced by the chemical changes taking place in the cell. Later experiments have formulated theories embracing both of these points of view but still unanimity has not been reached. Probably the most outstanding of the determinations made was that due to Nernst. It is now well known how the gas laws were applied to liquid and solutions through the discovery of the Osmotic Pressure of liquids.

    View record details
  • The physical constants of kauri gum

    Macky, W. A. (1924)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Kauri Gum is the fossilised resin of the Kauri Tree (Agathis Australis). The tree which often attains great size is found only in the Auckland Province, and the fossil gum is found embedded beneath the surface of the soil in open country on the sites of ancient forests. The gum is located by probing with long spears, and is then dug out. It is largely used in the manufacture of high class varnishes and linoleums. There is a large range of colour - from dark, almost black gum, that has evidently been subject in times gone by to the action of forest fires, to clear white, invaluable for certain descriptions of Varnishes. The pieces collected vary from small "chips" to the size of large flint stones and very occasionally lumps up to 50 lbs are found. Most of the gum obtained to-day is of the chip variety and considerable labour is involved in separating it from its surrounding earth. The gum used in these experiments was cut from a block weighing about three pounds, consisting of the best quality gum. As far as could be ascertained only one previous attempt has been made to determine any of the physical constants of the gum and then not even approximate results were obtained. This research was designed primarily to measure: (1) Resistivity (2) Surface Resistance (3) Dielectric Constant These three are of importance in connection with the possible electrical separation of the chip gum from impurities. Several methods are in use on the gum fields for separating the gum from clay and soils, but none give very good results. Since this research was started an English company has patented an electrostatic method of separation and intends to use it on their gum fields in North Auckland. The Refractive index and Specific Heat of the gum were also measured.

    View record details
  • A study of the transformation temperature of sulphur by means of X-ray diffraction photographs

    Simmers, R. G. (1928)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    On July 6th, 1826 Mitscherlich presented to the Berlin Academy his outstanding crystallographic paper, in which he announced his discovery that one of the best known of chemical elements, Sulphur, was capable of crystallising in two distinct forms belonging to the rhombic and monoclinic systems respectively. Other, but less important crystalline forms of sulphur exist or have since been discovered (Gernez 13; Lowry 47; Friedel 8; Engel 21; Wilkinson 60; Smith and Carson 45), while in addition there have been isolated at least two forms of amorphous sulphur and one form of colloidal (21). The two forms due to Mitscherlich and their main properties will first be treated in detail.

    View record details
  • The solution of mercuric sulphide in hydrgen iodide and the solubility of mercuric iodide in solutions of potassium iodide

    Dixon, J. K. (1927)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In group II A. Analysis two methods are used to dissolve precipitated Mercury Sulphide – potassium chlorate and concentrated hydrochloric acid or aqua regia. These methods are essentially the solution of mercury sulphide by means of nascent chlorine. A third method has been described whereby mercury sulphide is dissolved in a sulphuric acid solution of potassium iodide. This mixture liberates hydrogen iodide which is the dissolving agent. From the equations [complicated equations here] is seems possible that the dissolving action is due to complex formation. It will be seen from equation (1) that the lower the concentration of the sulphideions the greater will be tendency for mercury sulphide to dissolve. This furnishes an explanation why potassium iodide alone cannot be used with same success as hydrogen iodide. With potassium iodide potassium sulphide instead of hydrogen sulphide will be formed during the solution reaction. As potassium sulphide is the salt of a strong base there will remain in solution a high concentration of sulphideions which must promote the back reaction shown in equation (1) and an equilibrium is all that can be attained. It is not possible to reduce the sulphide ion concentration by boiling as it is with hydrogen sulphide since potassium sulphide is non volatile. If the ordinary methods and this new method are compared it is seen that whereas nascent chlorine converts mercury sulphide into mercury chloride, the action of hydrogen iodide is to form a complex salt which has a very low concentration of mercury ions. It is possible therefore that this new method may not give so sensitive a test for mercury. The object of this portion of the work is to ascertain the possibility of testing for mercury in Group II analysis by using the hydrogen iodide method of dissolving the precipitated mercury sulphide and to compare the sensitivity of the test with that of the methods usually employed.

    View record details