57 results for 1930, Masters

  • The Chinese in New Zealand

    Moore, Margaret Jean McNeur (1930)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    146 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A study of eighty New Zealand dietaries

    Jackson, Phyllis Rosalind (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    78 leaves :ill., ports. ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leave 72-78). University of Otago faculty : Home Science

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  • The military defence of New Zealand, 1850-1914

    Borrie, Wilfred David (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 104 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • Contributions of Germans and Scandinavians to the history of New Zealand.

    Charlton, Frank Alan (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 171 leaves :col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A study of fifty New Zealand family dietaries

    Chalmers, Enid Charlotte (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 84 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science.

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  • Dr. Edward Shortland and his work in northern New Zealand, 1841 to 1847.

    Campbell, George Hunter (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    139 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The life and work of Charles Henry Kettle.

    Martin, Marguerite Jopp (1934)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    363 p. :ill. (some col.), chart, map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography.

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  • Te Puoho and his South Island raid : or, from Taranaki to Tuturau.

    Ross, Angus (1933)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 95 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Introductory work for the standardisation and preparation of local norms for Burt's spelling tests.

    Mack, Charles Wilbur (1938)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    121, [20] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. Typescript. At head of title: Thesis for honours and M.A. in education.

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  • A preliminary ivestigation [i.e. investigation] of some of the habital characters of crested dogstail grass (Cynosurus cristatus), and an attempted evaluation of various lines of crested dogstail

    Thorp, Geoffrey (1931)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract. "THE AIMS OF THE INVESTIGATION:- (1) To obtain correlations between the habital characters of Crested Dogstail which may prove of help to breeding work in the future. (2) A preliminary evaluation of various lines of different origin which may be of value in aiding future mass selection."

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  • Selection in dairy cattle in New Zealand : a dissertation

    Gilmer, H G (1939)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Selection is not, in itself, generally believed to be a creative process. Ideally, it is a means by which the good, bad and indifferent elements comprising a given population are identified and classified. As such, selection is necessarily fundamental to any breeding system, whether the aim is consistent improvement or merely the maintenance of advances already achieved. Without some differentiation of the material, no firm basis can be established upon which to carry out further work. The fact that in dairy cattle breeding in particular, it is seldom possible, where characteristics of economic importance are concerned, to conduct an intimate inquiry into the different genetic elements comprising the given subject with any degree of certainty, should not be permitted to detract from the value of preliminary selection as a foundation for more comprehensive determination of worth. With such "aids to selection" as progeny tests, production records, pedigree estimates and type valuations, a fairly accurate estimate of hereditaty constitution can frequently be arrired at in so far as it affects the functions of economic value. The mode of operation of inheritance is now known in considerable detail and the breeders pursuing a broad programme of improvement may "act as if he knew the genes themselves" and make selections accordingly.

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  • A History of the New Zealand Civil Service, 1840-1866

    Zohrab, Balfour Douglas (1936)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The New Zealand Civil service is a typically British growth; it has developed from an inchoate, unregulated aggregation of disorganised departments along no settled line of growth, following no definite policy, aiming at nothing in particular; it sprang in the first instance rather from an imitation of Engliah models than from a real local need; it has been the prey of Governor after Governor, and Ministry after Ministry, and has changed its form and even to some extent its functions according to the ideas of the country's rulers every few years; not until the adoption of the recommendations of the Hunt Commission in 1912 did the service emerge into the regulated atmosphere that is essential to the smooth working of a modern administrative system. It can therefore be said that not until the twentieth century was the New Zealand Civil Service a modern institution; not until 1908 did the Government realise how far New Zealand then lagged behind Great Britain; even now, when we still lag behind, there are few signs of improvement. From the establishment of British sovereignty over New Zealand in 1840 until the passing of the Civil Service Act twenty-six years later there was no system either in the departments themselves or in the service as a whole; if indeed, it may be considered a whole during that time. From 1866 until 1912 the service drifted back towards chaos, as the authorities either did not carry out the provisions of the 1866 Act, or avoided its provisions and winked at its implications. The basis provisions of the Act, indeed, could not be ignored; but loopholes were many, and several of its most beneficial reforms were vitiated by systematic evasion.

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  • A study of the plateau array : thesis concerning subsection (e), 608 of the Animal Husbandry Section of the Master of Agricultural Science Degree and incorporating work carried out during the tenure of the Farmers' Union Research Scholarship and the Shell Scholarship1938

    Sutherland, J. A. (James Alan) (1939)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    A brief historical survey of the work leading up to the present study. The world sheep population is in the vicinity of seven hundred millions and the vast majority of these animals are kept, to a greater or a lesser degree, for their wool. It is, therefore, not surprising that Wool Research is by no means new. The production of sheep for their coat has been, as Barker points out ( 1), of importance since Biblical times and, although during the last epoch, with the perfection of methods for meat preservation, the importance of wool to the sheep industry has decreased, the need for wool research has been increased by the ever growing perfection of synthetic fibres. Wool research as such can possibly be dated from Dr. Hook who, in 1664, presented a paper to the Royal Society on the subject of wool and hair structure, but it was not until the advent of the compound microscope that the study of wool gained sufficient precision for measurements to be made. Such measurements opened the door for the wool physicist who, by the application of x-rays and other physical methods, has been able to explore with considerable success the ultimate structure of wool and hair. The value of wool has been determined, at least partially, by its length and thickness (or width), and thus measurements of wool in three dimensions have been important sections of wool research. As other valuable characters were recognised and evaluated they also were measured and correlations worked out. Thus it has come about that wool research has collected about itself innumerable patient measurements - measurements that have often merely evidenced the complexity of the fleece of the sheep as a subject of research.

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  • The range in colour of the flowering glume of Cynosurus cristatus L. and its relation to the germination capacity of the seed: thesis, Master of Agricultural Science, Massey Agricultural College

    Corkill, L (1931)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    It is well known that commercial lines of seed of Crested Dogstail often exhibit marked differences in colour, some samples in bulk being canary yellow while others are almost black. There is often great variation within a line in the colour of the individual seeds which may vary from greenish yellow through various shades of yellow, orange, and brown to almost a black colour. In some samples, however, the range in colour is more restricted, such samples naturally exhibiting a more uniform appearance. It is important to understand at the outset the commercial attitude towards the colour of a sample. Until recently the great demand by farmers was for seed of a bright yellow colour, which, although of a lower bushel weight than darker seed, was nevertheless more attractive in appearance. As a general rule the germination was good so that as far as utilisation in New Zealand was concerned this type was satisfactory. General observations have shown that there are distinct differences between plants in regard to the colour of the seeds at comparable stages in growth. It was considered that any data which could throw light on colour development and further facts on its probable utility would be useful. The investigations recorded in Part 1. were carried out with the object of attempting to ascertain whether the darkness in colour of Crested Dogstail seed is due to maturity alone, or whether there are other factors concerned.

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  • The methylation of αβ - dimethylglutaconic ester

    Sargent, J. D. (1931)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    For a considerable number of years the glutaconic acids and their derivatives have been the subject of much discussion and not a little controversy. The interest attaching to these substances lies in the fact that they exhibit geometrical isomerism together with tautomeric mobility which is associated with the three carbon system and activated by two terminal carboxyl groups. On the one hand Deist considered that all the properties of these compounds could be completely explained on the basis of a simple geometrical isomerism of the maleic acid – fumaric acid type, while on the other hand, Thorpe postulated a “normal” or symmetrical structure to account for the properties of certain derivatives of glutaconic acid, and he subsequently applied it to all the glutaconic compounds.

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  • The effect of the abolition of the provinces on political parties in the New Zealand House of Representatives, 1876-7

    Gardner, W. J. (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This work aims to describe the disappearance of an election issue during the life of the Parliament which has been elected in that issue. The members of the House of Representatives in the sixth Parliament of New Zealand were elected to vote “Aye” or “No” on the question “Shall the Act for the abolition of the Provinces remain on the Stature Book?” The Elections of 1875-6 were fought between the two recognized parties of Abolitionists and Provincialists. The Ministry of Sir Julius Vogel which has been responsible for the policy of Abolition took its stand against the attacks of the Provincialists led by Sir George Grey who demanded the repeal of the Abolition Act of 1875. Candidates who gave themselves out as Abolitionists pledged themselves to support the Abolition policy of the Vogel Ministry, while the Provincialists were pledged to repeal the Abolition Act. The simplicity of the issue was a great advantage to the Vogel Government, but, as the narrative of events shows, the Abolition question was really settled at the elections.

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  • Zinc and hydrogen ion activities in aqueous solutions of zinc chloride in the presence of potassium or barium chloride

    Crozier, H. W. (1930)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    When two salts of different electro affinities are present in the same solution, complex salts my be formed, the stronger salt appearing to force the weaker into the anion. The suggestion that the abnormal behaviour of certain electrolytes might be accounted for by assuming the formation of complex ions was first put forward by Hittorf, who, in the course of his study of migration, discovered that the migration ratio for the anion in solution of many double salts and certain single ones increased rapidly with increase in the concentration of the solution, and at high concentrations became greater than unity. Hitterof suggested that this was due to the formation of a double salt in the solution, which gradually dissociated in dilution. By the action of potassium cyanide upon an aqueous solution of silver nitrate, there is first formed a white precipitate of silver cyanide. K.C N. + Ag NO 3 → Ag. CN + K NO 3. This precipitate dissolves in an excess of potassium cyanide, forming potassium silver cyanide. Ag. CN + K CN → K Ag (CN) 2. This is a typical salt of potassium, giving all the reactions of this metal. A precipitate of silver sulphide is formed on passing H2 S through the solution but no precipitate of silver chloride is formed on the addition of a chloride showing that the concentration of silver ion in the solution is extremely small. Moreover, it can be shown by quantitative migration experiments that the silver migrates to the anode as part of the anion i.e. the salt is ionised thus K Ag. (CN) 2 ⇌ Kâ º + Ag (CN) 2 Many examples of such complex cyanides are known. Hittorf showed that in a concentrated solution of equivalent amounts of cadmium iodide and potassium iodide, the cadmium formed part of a complex anion. McBain and Van Rysselberge (J.A.C.S. 50.3009.1928) have shown that "when sufficient excess of chlorine ions or sulphate ions is added to .05 M solutions of salts contained a divalent ion, the migration of the anion is suppressed, or often reversed, showing that the sulphate or chlorine ions have combined with the undissociated molecules to form complex ions". Zinc forms salts of comparatively weak electro affinity, and consequently would be expected to form part of a complex anion in the presence of stronger salts such as those of the alkali and alkaline earth metals.

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  • Phase rule investigations of the three component systems phenol-water-salt at 25 degrees centigrade

    Brown, N. A. (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The phenol – water systems and the effect of the addition of a third component on the mutual solubilities have been the subject of much investigation during the last twenty or thirty years. The aspect usually considered has been the so-called “salting out” effect of an added salt on the phenol water solutions. The method of investigation for the most part has been the quantitative effect of the added salt on the critical solution temperature. This method has been criticised by Bailey, (J.C.S. 123, 2579, 1923). He states that it is no more satisfactory for two liquid layers than it would be if applied to the saturation curve of the three component system; a number of isolated points are obtained which lie on the surface separating the region of heterogeneity from the rest of the figure, and the comparison of results is difficult. He maintains that the most satisfactory treatment of such systems is a complete phase rule study. Bancroft (J. Phys. Chem. 1897 I) showed that the phenomena observed in such systems could be theoretically predicted from considerations of the phase rule. If a given system is represented by the usual triangular method, for any given temperature one has normally a saturation curve, and a binodal curve, and the many complications which may arise are due to a combination of the two. It is obvious that if the theoretical aspect of the various cases of salt addition to phenol water systems is to be studies, the phase rule method is most satisfactory. It shows clearly the general effect on the critical solution temperature; it indicated any formation of compounds; and the general form of the curve in the case of “salting-in” shows whether this is due to solubility of the substances in both liquids or to abnormal behaviour such as the formation of complexes in solution. Finally, by comparing the actual curves obtained for the different systems studied the various possibilities can be clearly distinguished without reference to numerical figures.

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  • Studies in catalytic hydrogenation: the system HCN + 2H2=CH3NH2

    Barrer, R. M. (1931)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Chemistry owes much to the catalytic forces which effect otherwise difficulty accomplished reactions. To catalysis Organic Chemistry owes the Grignard reagents, which have been employed not only for a multitude of simpler syntheses but also for the more complex syntheses of carbohydrates (Paal. Ber, 1905, 38 1656; 1906,39,1301,2823, 2827) Frankland and Twiss J.C.S. 1905, 87, 864), of terpenss (Perkin J.C.S. 1907, 91, 480, Hesse Ber. 1909, 42, 1127, Mills and Bain J.C.S. 1910, 97, 1866) and of organo-silicon compounds (Kipping J.C.S. 1901 to 1909). Pope and Peachy effected resolutions of tin compounds with its aid. Chlorination is effected catalytically by suitable carriers. The Friedel and Crafte reaction is effected also by suitable halides. Numerous condensations such as the Benzoin condensation, the Aldol condensation, the Claisen condensation, and also esterification are catalytically effected. Equilibria between dynamic isomerides, in racemisation, and in mutarotation, are promoted by catalysis. Technical chemistry has, through catalysis, reversed the economic standing of nations. Cases in point are the synthesis of indigo, a stage in which is the catalytic oxidation of Napthalene by Sulphuric acid and Mercury, and the manufacture of sulphuric acids, of Ammonia and of Nitrates. The manufacture of synthetic petrols, power alcohols, and the new utilisations of coal depend entirely upon catalysts for their successful functioning. Analytical chemistry employs catalysts in processes of gas absorption such as addition of Uranyl Sulphate to Sulphuric Acid in the absorption of Ethylene (Lebeau and Damiens Compt. Rand. 1913, 156, 557) or of Corrosive Sublimate to alhaline Pyrogallol to accelerate the absorption of Oxygen. (Stassana, Compt. Rend. Soc. Biol. 1905, 58, 96). Also in Oxidation, such as the permanganate titration of iron in the presence of Hydrochloric and of Manganese Salts (Kessler. Pogg. Am. 1863, 118, 48; 119, 225), or the ability of Ferrous Sulphate to promote interaction between Potassium Persilphate and Potassium Iodide (Price Z Phys. Chem. 1898, 27, 474); and Reduction as in the employment of a Zinc-Copper Couple for the reduction of Chlorates to Chlorates (Thorpe and Eccles J.C.S. 1873, 26, 541; Bothamley and Thompson Ibid 1888, 53, 164). Catalysts are also employed in Organic analysis, as for example the use of colloidal platinum metals to convert Halogen compounds into Hydrogenated products and Halogen acid in the presence of Hydrogen (Borshe and Heimburger, Ber. 1915, 48, 452, 850). In Inorganic Chemistry a large number of reactions are catalytically accelerated. One of the best known is the decomposition of Potassium Chlorate in the Presence of Manganese Dioxide. Numerous catalyses are cited in the work of Dhar. (Ann. Chim. 11, 130-223, 1919). Hydrogen peroxide, another example of classical importance in chemical kinetics is decomposed by numerous agents, such as glass wool, salts of heavy metals, colloidal platinum. In Electrochemistry one may cite such examples as the addition of Fluorides in the preparation of Persulphates or percarbonates, (Muller and Friedberger, Z. Elektrochem., 1902, 8, 230), or the use of Lead Peroxide anodes in the oxidation of Chromates to Dichromates (Z. Elektrochem, 1905, 11, 863). Para-nitrotoluene with platinum anodes yields p-nitro-benzoic acid almost quantitatively. An enormous number of reactions is accelerated by radiant energy, according to photo chemical laws. A typical example is the union of Hydrogen and Chlorine, whose mechanism has occupied the attention of numerous workers. The photocatalytic combination of carbon-monoxide and Chlorine, of Sulphur Dioxide and Chlorine, of saturated, unsaturated, and aromatic hydro-carbons, and of acids (much as Acetic acid) and Chlorine furnish still further examples. Such reactions are further sensitive to the presence of ordinary material catalysts or anti-catalysts (See Griffiths and McKeowan, (“Photochemistry” p. 626.)

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  • The history of the second New Zealand Parliament: being an account of the two houses of the Legislature 1856-1860

    Simpson, M. M. (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The second parliament constitutes an important landmark in the political development of New Zealand, for with it cabinet government, that heritage of the English parliamentary system came into being; as in England, not by legislative enactment, but as a convention of the constitution. The fact that the inauguration of responsible government marked the vindication of the principles for which the first parliament had struggled, must serve as a justification for the space occupied in this history by the story of those struggles. The establishment of responsible government must necessarily occupy an important place in any history of the second parliament, and in order to understand the importance of this development, some account of the events which had preceded it is necessary. The main original sources from which the material for this account has been gathered are the “Parliamentary Debates” of 1856-58 and 1858-60, compiled at a later date from speeches of members and other available material; and the unpublished Journal of Henry Sewell. Sewell was, as a member of the partially responsible ministry of the first parliament, leader of the first short-lived responsible ministry of the second parliament and a member of the Stafford ministry, and was thus in a position to give an account of all the more important parliamentary happenings from inside. His journal is particularly valuable for the light which it throws upon the events of the time and the interesting character sketches which it gives us of the more important men in the parliamentary sphere. Another work which has furnished important information is Saunder’s “History of New Zealand”. Saunders also was a member of New Zealand parliaments almost continuously from 1861-96. Much space has been devoted to the subject of native affairs, but that may be justified by the fact that, in view of the seriousness of the native situation, a great deal of the time of the parliament was actually spend in the discussion in the native war, which occupied the time of the parliament during practically the whole of the last session, it is necessary to know something of the situation among the natives, which had led to the establishment of the “Maori King” movement and the land league, and of the native feud in Taranaki which was closely connected with the question of land sales. The treatment of the subject throughout has been topical rather than chronological, and although it has been impossible to deal with all the subjects which were discussed by the parliament or all the measures which were placed upon the statue books, an attempt has been made to follow the course of the more important movements and those most likely to affect the subsequent development of the colony

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