74 results for 1930

  • The Chinese in New Zealand

    Moore, Margaret Jean McNeur (1930)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    146 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A study of eighty New Zealand dietaries

    Jackson, Phyllis Rosalind (1937)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    78 leaves :ill., ports. ; 31 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leave 72-78). University of Otago faculty : Home Science

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  • A thesis on the property of the Blackwater Mines Ltd., Waiuta.

    Jones, Lloyd Samuel (1938)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    45 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago : Otago School of Mines

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  • Thesis on the Blackwater Mine, Reefton District, New Zealand.

    Service, Harold (1934)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    79 leaves, [32] leaves of plates (some folded) :ill. ; 27 cm. Univeristy of Otago : Otago School of Mines. 2 diagrams in pocket.

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  • Thesis on the Briseis Mine, Derby, Tasmania.

    Alexander, J. M. (1936)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    194 [1] leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf 192-[195] University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • The military defence of New Zealand, 1850-1914

    Borrie, Wilfred David (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 104 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

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  • Contributions of Germans and Scandinavians to the history of New Zealand.

    Charlton, Frank Alan (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    xiv, 171 leaves :col. ill., col. maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • A study of fifty New Zealand family dietaries

    Chalmers, Enid Charlotte (1936)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 84 leaves :col. ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science.

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  • Dr. Edward Shortland and his work in northern New Zealand, 1841 to 1847.

    Campbell, George Hunter (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    139 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • The life and work of Charles Henry Kettle.

    Martin, Marguerite Jopp (1934)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    363 p. :ill. (some col.), chart, map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography.

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  • Te Puoho and his South Island raid : or, from Taranaki to Tuturau.

    Ross, Angus (1933)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 95 leaves :ill. (some col.) ; 30cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Introductory work for the standardisation and preparation of local norms for Burt's spelling tests.

    Mack, Charles Wilbur (1938)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    121, [20] leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. Typescript. At head of title: Thesis for honours and M.A. in education.

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  • A preliminary ivestigation [i.e. investigation] of some of the habital characters of crested dogstail grass (Cynosurus cristatus), and an attempted evaluation of various lines of crested dogstail

    Thorp, Geoffrey (1931)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract. "THE AIMS OF THE INVESTIGATION:- (1) To obtain correlations between the habital characters of Crested Dogstail which may prove of help to breeding work in the future. (2) A preliminary evaluation of various lines of different origin which may be of value in aiding future mass selection."

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  • Selection in dairy cattle in New Zealand : a dissertation

    Gilmer, H G (1939)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Selection is not, in itself, generally believed to be a creative process. Ideally, it is a means by which the good, bad and indifferent elements comprising a given population are identified and classified. As such, selection is necessarily fundamental to any breeding system, whether the aim is consistent improvement or merely the maintenance of advances already achieved. Without some differentiation of the material, no firm basis can be established upon which to carry out further work. The fact that in dairy cattle breeding in particular, it is seldom possible, where characteristics of economic importance are concerned, to conduct an intimate inquiry into the different genetic elements comprising the given subject with any degree of certainty, should not be permitted to detract from the value of preliminary selection as a foundation for more comprehensive determination of worth. With such "aids to selection" as progeny tests, production records, pedigree estimates and type valuations, a fairly accurate estimate of hereditaty constitution can frequently be arrired at in so far as it affects the functions of economic value. The mode of operation of inheritance is now known in considerable detail and the breeders pursuing a broad programme of improvement may "act as if he knew the genes themselves" and make selections accordingly.

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  • A History of the New Zealand Civil Service, 1840-1866

    Zohrab, Balfour Douglas (1936)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The New Zealand Civil service is a typically British growth; it has developed from an inchoate, unregulated aggregation of disorganised departments along no settled line of growth, following no definite policy, aiming at nothing in particular; it sprang in the first instance rather from an imitation of Engliah models than from a real local need; it has been the prey of Governor after Governor, and Ministry after Ministry, and has changed its form and even to some extent its functions according to the ideas of the country's rulers every few years; not until the adoption of the recommendations of the Hunt Commission in 1912 did the service emerge into the regulated atmosphere that is essential to the smooth working of a modern administrative system. It can therefore be said that not until the twentieth century was the New Zealand Civil Service a modern institution; not until 1908 did the Government realise how far New Zealand then lagged behind Great Britain; even now, when we still lag behind, there are few signs of improvement. From the establishment of British sovereignty over New Zealand in 1840 until the passing of the Civil Service Act twenty-six years later there was no system either in the departments themselves or in the service as a whole; if indeed, it may be considered a whole during that time. From 1866 until 1912 the service drifted back towards chaos, as the authorities either did not carry out the provisions of the 1866 Act, or avoided its provisions and winked at its implications. The basis provisions of the Act, indeed, could not be ignored; but loopholes were many, and several of its most beneficial reforms were vitiated by systematic evasion.

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  • A study of the plateau array : thesis concerning subsection (e), 608 of the Animal Husbandry Section of the Master of Agricultural Science Degree and incorporating work carried out during the tenure of the Farmers' Union Research Scholarship and the Shell Scholarship1938

    Sutherland, J. A. (James Alan) (1939)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    A brief historical survey of the work leading up to the present study. The world sheep population is in the vicinity of seven hundred millions and the vast majority of these animals are kept, to a greater or a lesser degree, for their wool. It is, therefore, not surprising that Wool Research is by no means new. The production of sheep for their coat has been, as Barker points out ( 1), of importance since Biblical times and, although during the last epoch, with the perfection of methods for meat preservation, the importance of wool to the sheep industry has decreased, the need for wool research has been increased by the ever growing perfection of synthetic fibres. Wool research as such can possibly be dated from Dr. Hook who, in 1664, presented a paper to the Royal Society on the subject of wool and hair structure, but it was not until the advent of the compound microscope that the study of wool gained sufficient precision for measurements to be made. Such measurements opened the door for the wool physicist who, by the application of x-rays and other physical methods, has been able to explore with considerable success the ultimate structure of wool and hair. The value of wool has been determined, at least partially, by its length and thickness (or width), and thus measurements of wool in three dimensions have been important sections of wool research. As other valuable characters were recognised and evaluated they also were measured and correlations worked out. Thus it has come about that wool research has collected about itself innumerable patient measurements - measurements that have often merely evidenced the complexity of the fleece of the sheep as a subject of research.

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  • The range in colour of the flowering glume of Cynosurus cristatus L. and its relation to the germination capacity of the seed: thesis, Master of Agricultural Science, Massey Agricultural College

    Corkill, L (1931)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    It is well known that commercial lines of seed of Crested Dogstail often exhibit marked differences in colour, some samples in bulk being canary yellow while others are almost black. There is often great variation within a line in the colour of the individual seeds which may vary from greenish yellow through various shades of yellow, orange, and brown to almost a black colour. In some samples, however, the range in colour is more restricted, such samples naturally exhibiting a more uniform appearance. It is important to understand at the outset the commercial attitude towards the colour of a sample. Until recently the great demand by farmers was for seed of a bright yellow colour, which, although of a lower bushel weight than darker seed, was nevertheless more attractive in appearance. As a general rule the germination was good so that as far as utilisation in New Zealand was concerned this type was satisfactory. General observations have shown that there are distinct differences between plants in regard to the colour of the seeds at comparable stages in growth. It was considered that any data which could throw light on colour development and further facts on its probable utility would be useful. The investigations recorded in Part 1. were carried out with the object of attempting to ascertain whether the darkness in colour of Crested Dogstail seed is due to maturity alone, or whether there are other factors concerned.

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  • Calendar 1932

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1932)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1939

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1939)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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  • Calendar 1933

    Victoria University College (Wellington, N.Z.) (1933)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

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