3 results for 1940, Doctoral

  • Part I, The solubility of gases in water-methanol mixtures and derived thermodynamic properties. Part II, Rates of solution of gases : thesis presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, University of New Zealand

    Law, John Trevor (1949)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    The present investigation was carried out as part of a wider plan to determine the effect of methanol In breaking down the water structure in water-methanol mixtures and the possibility of preferential orientation of one or other of the constituent molecules of the solvent in the neighbourhood of the solute molecules.

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  • Studies on carotene metabolism : a thesis presented for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, University of New Zealand

    McGillivray, William Anderson (1949)

    Doctoral thesis
    Massey University

    Over twenty years ago, during the course of the early investigation into the chemistry and physiology of vitamin A, it was found that the potency of herbage was related to its carotene content and mainly as a result of the work of Moore, it was established that this carotene could be utilized by animals and converted into vitamin A. Since this recognition of the carotenes as provitamins, the problems of the mode and site of coverstion in the animal body have aroused the interset of many workers. Until recently it was conaidered that the liver was the main site of conversion. Apart from the somewhat equivocal results obtained from attempted in vitro conversions using liver preparations, this assumption was based mainly on the fact that the feeding of carotene to vitamin A-deficient animals resulted in the almost immediate appearances of the vitamin in the livers. At the same time little, if any, carotene appeared in the livers whereas the alimentary tracts contained relatively large amounts of carotene and little vitamin.

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  • Polarographic studies in the anthraquinone series

    Sprott, Thomas James (1948)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Polarographic chemical analysis, although invented only twenty-five years ago, has already become a standard method ror the research worker and industrial analyst alike. The variety or topics in pure, bio- and commercial chemistry which may be investigated easily with the polarograph, as well as its application to microchenistry, has found it a place in laboratories throughout the world. The invention offthe method, and much or the pioneer development are due to Jaroslav Heyrovsky and his colleagues at Charles University, Prague, (Phil. Mag., 1923, 45, 303; Trans. Faraday Soc., 1923, 19, 692 et seq.) Kucera, also of Charles University, noticed peculiar inflections in the electrocapillary curve of mercury under certain conditions, and devised the "dropping mercury electrode", now commonly used; to investigate these, (Ann. Physik., 1903,11, 529). Further work on this subject by Heyrovsky led ultimately to the development of polarography, (Ohemo Listy, 1922, 12, 256.)

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