90 results for 1940, Masters

  • The Whalemen of Foveaux Strait, 1829-1850

    Irwin, Cecil H (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iii, 187 p. [9] leaves of plates : ill., diagrs., maps. Notes: Original lacks p.160. Thesis (M. A.)--University of Otago, 1948. Microfilm. 1 reel microfilm (negative).

    View record details
  • Agricultural education in post-primary schools: being an investigation into agricultural courses in the post-primary schools of Canterbury, Otago and Southland

    Watson, John E (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    View record details
  • The geology of the northern part of the Taringatura survey district

    Coombs, Douglas Saxon (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 200 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology. Typescript.

    View record details
  • The Southland secession movement

    Ryan, Archie Bruce (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 204 p. : maps, tables. Notes: Typescript. "Thesis presented for the Degree of M.A. (Honours in History) 1947" [Univ. of New Zealand] Bibliography: p.202-204.

    View record details
  • The South Island Māori population.

    Rutherford, D. W. (Donald William) (1941)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    "D. W. Rutherford"--handwritten on t.p. Typescript (photocopy).

    View record details
  • Early Otago newspapers

    Clapperton, Barbara (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    INTRODUCTION. It has been said with much truth that the newspaper of today is one of the world’s most influential text books. It is thus easy to appreciate the still greater importance of the newspaper of seventy-five or more years ago. Our present world with its great advances in science, with the invention and development of the radio, the facsimile newspaper, television, radio-type and newsreels offers many challenges to the ordinary newspaper. Seventy-five years ago such opponents were not known, and the newspaper took first place as the only medium by which local news and overseas news were transmitted to the public. The relation of the daily paper to the community was very aptly summed up by Julius Vogel who wrote in the first leading article in the Otago Daily Times, 15 November, 1861, and reprinted in the Diamond Jubilee Issue, 1921 ---“The benefits arising from a daily newspaper are not to be exaggerated. Independent of the opportunity it affords to the community of making its wants felt and its wishes known to the outside world, and so asserting its dignity and advancing its importance, the moral, social, and commercial influences of a daily journal are strongly marked. It brings the members of a community into a closer unity; knits bonds of fellowship between them, not easily severed; facilitates business, advances the value of property, and in short mixes itself up so intimately with the daily events of life that, once having experienced its benefits, its absence is nothing short of a public calamity”. That the value of a newspaper in any community was recognised is borne out by the number established throughout Otago during its earliest years, not least important of which was the Otago News published in the same year as the arrival of “John Wickliffe” and the Philip Laing”. In outlying districts as population grew and as industry flourished, there came also the press, helped greatly by the impetus of goldseeking. It is with the development of these early newspapers, with their ambitions and struggles - and in many cases their failures - that I am here concerned, for they are the record of courage and endeavour inherent in the making up of those early colonists.

    View record details
  • A proximate analysis of a Maori food; the Karaka berry

    McCurdy, Betty Joan (1947)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 114 leaves :col. ill, maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago faculty: Home Science

    View record details
  • Investigations on karakin and Hiptagenic acid

    McChesney, John William (1946)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 150 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves [145]-150.

    View record details
  • A history of New Zealand anthropology during the nineteenth century

    Booth, John March (1949)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 236 leaves :ill., map ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript.

    View record details
  • Some observations on the grazing behaviour and water consumption of lactating Friesian and Jersey cows : being a thesis prepared by "549" for the degree of M.Agr.Sc.

    Southcombe, Francis John (1947)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract

    View record details
  • Measurement of dry matter intake of dry jersey cows on hay and silage alone and in combination : thesis submitted ... for the Animal Husbandry section of the M. Agr. Sc. examination

    Chau, Hon Kau (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In the provision of an adequate supply of nutrients to dairy cows, primary consideration must be given to the capacity or appetite of the animals for the food offered. This is due to the fact that appetite, measured in terms of dry matter intake per day, limits the quantity of food (dry matter) that a cow consumes. In feeding bulky roughages to dairy cows, appetite is an important factor to be considered. Bulky roughage such as hay has a low nutrient content whereas silage is both low in nutrients and dry matter, when compared with concentrated foods.

    View record details
  • A study of the operation of selection for production in a New Zealand dairy herd : being a thesis submitted by "Bonus" for the Animal Husbandry section of the M. Agr. Sc. examination

    Green, Samuel Logan (1940)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract. The following taken from the introduction: "It may be argued that a datry farmer who is teeting hls eow8 every year and breedlng hts own replacement helfers, slred by pedtgree dalry bull-s wlth r.easonable bntterfat backtng, shorrld by a prognamme of .tntelligent cuLltng, be able to establtsh and malntain a herrl consistlng malnly of mature cows of hlgh produclng abtllty. Thls ls the polnt that thts stucly endeavours to answer."

    View record details
  • The effect of sex upon growth in the pig / being the thesis submitted by "Bough" for the M. Agr. Sc. degree

    Wallace, Lindsay Russell (1941)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract. The following is taken from the introduction: "Almost a quarter of a century has ela sed since D'Aroy Thompson ( 1) published his c lassioal work "Growth and Form", in which he demonstrated that all living organisms,except the yery simplest owe their form to the phenomena of differential growth . ' During this period there has been a realisation that the phenomena of di fferential growth are fundamental to many branc hes of biologi cal study, and many of the broad empirical laws invol ved have been inyestigated. Huxle3 (2), in his book "Problems of Relative Growth", brings together the accumulated work of many scientists and clear ]3 demonstrates the widespread occurrence of d ifferential growth gradients in many diverse species and shows tbat many cases of heterogenic growth. are capable of" quantitative exp.ression..."

    View record details
  • A survey of certain aspects of the share-milking industry in the Waikato, 1945/46 being a thesis presented by "547" in partial fulfilment of the requirements of the M. Ag. Sc. Degree

    Milliken, M. (1947)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Associated with the outstanding development of the dairy industry in New Zealand over the years of this century has been the rapid growth of that section of dairying known as share-milking. The term 'share-miIking', in this country, applies to that type of dairy farm labour, the wages for which are based upon some proportion of the proceeds of the sale of farm produce. This general definition covers in New Zealand three principal systems of share-farming: (a) 'Quarter share-milking', where the farm owner supplies the land and capital (including the herd) and the share-milker supplies only the labour required for the milking and care of the stock. He does not do general farm maintenance except for added remuneration and received, at the time to which this study applies, 271/2% of the proceeds of the sale of dairy products and half the proceeds of the by-products. (b) 'Third share-milking, where the farm owner supplies the land and capital (including the herd) and the share-milker provides the labour for, and does, the general farm maintenance in addition to the milking and care of the stock. His share of the receipts was (at the time to which this applies) 36-2/3% of the dairy cheque and half the proceeds from the sale of by-products. (c) 'Half share-milking', where the farm owner supplies the land and fixed capital and the share-milker supplies the herd in addition to all the farm labour. He generally receives half the dairy cheque and half the proceeds from the sale of by-products. This division may be and often is, varied as there is no Statutory Regulation for this type of agreement. See Appendix II for the regulations covering the proportionate receipts and payments of each of the two parties under the first two types of agreement. A popular half share agreement is also appended.

    View record details
  • Studies on the thyroid gland of cattle : thesis submitted / by no. 391 [M.G. Hollard] for the Animal Husbandry section of the M. Agr. Sc. examination

    Hollard, Murray George (1946)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    No abstract. The following is taken from the introduction: "Ttre health and productlon of the dalry cow 1s depend.ent Opo-n--h-E_eftfcffi -tunebi€nln g o f many 1 n temaL a ted phy si o1 o gl cal processes. For many years conslderable attention has been pald to digestlon, absorptlon of nutrlents, eirculatlon of the blood, utillsatlon of netabollc products, md excretion, It ls only in recent years, however, that the irnportance of the endocrlne system has been appreciated, and there still- renalns a large amount of fundanental researcb to be carried out before a eornplete understanding of the role of hornones wllL be obtalned.,"

    View record details
  • The influence of temperature on the performance of dairy cattle : with particular reference to the improvement of dairy production in India : dissertation presented for the animal husbandry section of a M. Agr. Sc. degree

    Afsaruddin, Muhammad (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In India, although there's a huge population of cattle, the milk production is scanty and the consumption of milk per head of human population is meagre. The importance of milk in maintaining the health of the Indian people who are mostly vegetarian cannot he over-emphasised and in view of this point an urgent need has been felt lately to improve dairy production in India. In the past European dairy breeds have been imported into India and have been either bred pure or used to grade up the native cattle but such attempts have turned into failure. In the greater portion of India, excepting at high altitudes on the hills, annual average temperature is high and particularly so during the summer months. It has often been suggested that the high atmospheric temperature has been the cause of degeneration of European cattle in India thus presenting a great obstacle to the improvement of India's dairy production. Very little investigation in this respect has been undertaken in India and there has been a controversy over the importance of high environmental temperature in dairy cattle. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the influence of temperature on the performance of dairy cattle from the observations that have been made in various countries, particularly tropical countries, and to draw a conclusion with regard to the policy of breeding dairy cattle in India in order to increase dairy production. As indicated by the title of the problem this study includes the influence of both high and low environmental temperature.Eff

    View record details
  • Studies on the Systematics and Anatomy of New Zealand Earthworms

    Lee, Kenneth Ernest (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The study of New Zealand earthworms has been extensive, but has been confined principally to the systematics of the group. Only one family of the Oligochaeta, the Megascolecidae, is represented in the endemic fauna, but within this family, over eighty species, belonging to seventeen genera, have been recorded and described. Apart from the Megascolecidae, certain species, lumbricids, worldwide in their distribution, are present and are regarded as having been introduced through the agency of man. The family Megascolecidae is confined almost entirely to the Southern hemisphere, and the southern regions of the Northern hemisphere, and within these regions, the greatest number of species occur in New Zealand, South America, South Africa, and Australia. When the distribution of the Megascolecidae became known, in the late nineteenth century, its sporadic nature evoked a great deal of interest among zoo-geographers, since earthworms, being terrestrial, and unable to tolerate immersion in salt water, form an ideal basis for the consideration of dispersal problems among terrestrial animals as a whole. The interest thus aroused in the Megascolecidae led to much work on the group in New Zealand. Michaelsen (1913 (b)) accounts for the predominance of the Megascolecidae in the southern continental areas by postulating that originally the family had a wide distribution in the nothern and southern continents, and that other families (e.g. the Glossoscolecidae), evolved more recently in the northern continents, have gradually superseded the Megascolecidae in all but the most remote regions of their original area of distribution. Matthew (1915) came to a similar conclusion in regard to the origin of present southern faunas in the course of his work on the distribution and evolution of the Mammalia. Evidence in favour of Michaelsen's conclusions can also be derived from the distribution of slugs, spiders, Collembola, Coleoptera, littoral Echinoderms, Polychaeta and Brachiopoda in the southern land masses.

    View record details
  • A Study of Our Knowledge of Persons with Special Reference to the Work of Dr. Martin Buber

    Brown, Denzil J. (1948)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The field of philosophy is wide and varied, and often appears to be remote from the common life of men. Yet this remoteness is only superficial for the problems with which philosophy deals arise in the first instance from questions which occur to the man in the street, though he may not pursue them systematically. He cannot avoid meeting them, though he may avoid trying to answer them. What is the meaning of life? What is the meaning of the universe? Is the ordering of nature, of society of the individual organism quite fortuitous or according to some unwritten law? How do we know other people and objects? What is the nature of God? That these questions are dependent upon human reflection is not hard to see. They arise out of reflection, and they depend to a greater or less degree upon reflection for their answer. But we may go further and question reflection itself: What is the nature of reflection? What is its subject matter? Is reflection reliable? In other words, “How do we know?” The examination of this question constitutes that aspect of philosophy known as “Epistemology”, and upon the answer to that question the fate of philosophy depends to a great extent.

    View record details
  • Studies of the coat of the Romney lamb : practical and theoretical aspects of hair morphology, with special reference to the evolution of the fleece : thesis submitted by "Bourn" [for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science]

    Goot, Henry (1940)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The original purpose of the present thesis was to answer this question: "To what extent is a britch of high halo-hair abundance an indicator of the non-kemp hairiness of the fleece?" It was assumed by Dr Dry in the light of earlier observations, that, on a britch with very many halo-hairs, the large Curly Tip fibres would be very hairy, and this has proved to be so. Especially did we want to learn about the degree of hairiness on the part of the fleece near to the britch. The gradient over the body from the britch was also much in mind, all the more because the boundary between the area on the britch with very many halo hairs and the neighbouring region with far fewer halo hairs is often abrupt. The aim of the work was that just defined, but the analysis of the samples examined provided information on a number of other matters, several of which may be thought more interesting than the problem proposed at the outset. These various results are reported in this thesis.

    View record details
  • Studies of the coat in the New Zealand Romney Marsh N-type sheep / Code Number 148

    Ross, Janet (1945)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Kemps may be defined as hairy fibres which are shed after a short period of growth. Birthcoat kemps are succeeded by fibres in the same follicle, and there may be varying amounts of this second generation that are also shed. Thus, successions of kemp often continue throughout the life of the sheep making the fleece uneven in a way usually undesirable. Previous studies have shown that selection against high abundance of halo-hairs is effective in elimination kemp. Although kemps are associated with coarse fleeces with high abundance of halo-hairs, they are not always present. A hairy birthcoat follicle after growing and shedding a kemp may produce fibres of persistent growth; hence this study should have significance for breeders of Mountain Sheep which characteristically have hairy birthcoats. It is understood that a thick, hairy birthcoat of halo-hairs with a minimum of kemp in the adult fleece is desirable in the Scotch Black-face lamb. The various characteristic fibre types of the sheep's fleece have been studied and classified by Dry (1933). According to the collection of these types present in one sample of wool, certain characteristic arrays can be recognised (Dry 1934). There arrays can be arranged in a series:- those with sickle fibres are non-Plateau with few halo hairs and include Salle, Ravine, Valley and Plain arrays; those without sickle fibres are Plateau, coarse arrays with many large hairy halo-hairs. The former type of array, non-Plateau, is found on finer woolled sheep such as Wensleydales, fine Romneys ets. while the latter type of array, Plateau, is found on N-type Romneys and Mountain breeds such as Scottish Blackface.

    View record details