527 results for 1960

  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

    View record details
  • Structural, tectonic and climatic control of the fluvial geomorphology of the Manawatu River west of the Manawatu Gorge

    Fair, Eileen Eleanor (1968)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The Manawatu River is one of the major rivers of the North Is1and of New Zealand, draining a catchment of 2,296 square miles. The river is over 120 miles long and is one of the few rivers in the world to rise on one side on an axial mountain range, flow through the range and enter the sea on the opposite side. (See Fig.1.) The Manawatu River, rising on the eastern flanks of the Ruahine Range flows south to the 'Dannevirke Depression' (Lillie, 1953, 89) where it Joins the northeastwards-flowing Mangahao, Mangatainoka and Tiraumea Rivers. These rivers with catchments on the eastern side of the Tararua-Ruahine Range, drain an elongated basin which extends from north of Dannevirke to south of Eketahuna. They join the Manawatu River in the Dannevirke Depression then flow westwards across the Tararua-Ruahine Range in the Manawatu Gorge to the Kairanga alluvial plain. Although only one-third of the river's catchment lies to the west of the axial range, the river here has an attenuated course of 63 miles, a little more than half its total length. Between February and April 1967 the writer completed a preliminary study of the terraces along the Manawatu River, between the Manawatu Gorge and the river mouth at Foxton. Investigations revealed that the best terrace development existed on the ten miles between the Gorge and Palmerston North whereas, in the lower reaches, terrace development is limited by prevalence of flooding, the swampy nature of the terrain and the progradation of the coastline. The unstable sand dunes of the coastal belt have also masked most of the terrace series in the lower reaches of the river.

    View record details
  • The segmental sensory innervation of the skin of the sheep : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Science from Massey University

    Kirk, Edwin James (1967)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The interest in the segmental basis of cutaneous sensory innervation evinced by the ancient Greeks was developed into a major contribution to experimental biology by the studies in man and animals by Sherrington, Head and Foerster. The present study is one of a number of more recent investigations of the dermatomes in animals from which a great deal of comparative information has been obtained. The particular significance of a study of the functional anatomy of the sheep in relation to veterinary medicine has been discussed. The experimental work described in this thesis involved particular consideration of the following 1. The features of the topographical anatomy of the vertebral column of the sheep which were found to be of importance in the experimental procedures. 2. The value of the "remaining sensibility" technique as a means of defining the dermatomes of the sheep. 3. The use of figurines and photographs in the schematic representation of the experimental results. 4. The justification for basing the definition of the dermatomes largely on the responses to pinch stimuli. 5. A discussion of the features of the dermatomes of the sheep in relation to embryological development and the observations which have been made in other species. 6. The changes in muscle tonus in the limbs which followed section of the dorsal spinal nerve roots or damage to the spinal cord. 7. The aberrations in feeding, defecation, micturition and respiration produced by various dorsal root sections. 8. The major pathways in the spinal cord followed by the primary afferent fibres, as revealed by the Marchi technique. 9. A general consideration of the significance of studies such as the present, and their possible extension to include deeper somatic or visceral structures. Details of the dorsal root sections undertaken have been provided in an appendix.

    View record details
  • The development of unploughable hill country : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Massey University

    Wright, A. (1963)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study is an investigation into the relative non-acceptance by farmers of new technology in the form of the Te Awa type of hill country development. It embodies an investigation into the physical and economic aspects of development, and of the factors which are currently limiting or preventing development. Technological change can be defined as change which results in an objective or end being achieved in a physically different way. Of particular interest are those changes which increase profits, although whether a change is in fact profitable, may require a fairly detailed investigation. There are three major sources of new technology in agriculture; firstly, from research aimed at developing and proving new techniques, (e.g. the breeding of improved pasture species); secondly, as an unplanned by-product of pure research (e.g. the n-type Romney sheep); and thirdly, from planned or chance discovery by farmers, (e.g. the Hunter fence).

    View record details
  • Palmerston North : a study of suburban shops and services : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Worthington, Christine Rosemary (1969)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Aim The aim of the thesis is to try to establish, through a study of suburban shops and services in Palmerston North, some of the past and present trends and patterns which might assist in the future planning of suburban facilities. Chapter I describes the general patterns of suburban shops and services. In Chapters II, III and IV shopping centres of four or more shops and services are examined in greater detail, while Chapter V is a case study of shops, services and shopping patterns in Milson suburb. Method Direct observation and classification of suburban shops and services was followed by interviews with shopkeepers in some suburban shopping centres, and finally a random sample of Milson shoppers was interviewed in their homes. The first task was to order and define suburban shops and services so that they could be studied. The Palmerston North City Council Town Planning Department's definition of the central business district (or city centre) was used, and shops within its boundaries excluded. All other shops listed in the Town Planning Department's booklet "Suburban Shopping: List of Activities: March 1968" were marked on large-scale maps of the city and checked in the field; new shops were added and defunct ones deleted. All the different functions found in suburban shopping centres were listed (Table III) and groups of shops were classified according to the number of shops and services situated together (Table I). The location of shops and services and the association of functions were mapped, and the larger groups of shops with four or more functions, termed shopping centres, were studied in detail. All the owners or managers of shops, as well as hairdressers and barbers in all the major shopping centres (10 - 16 functions) and some of the minor centres (4 - 8 functions) were interviewed. Only three people refused to answer the questionnaire (Appendix A), and in two of these cases some of the information was obtained from the firms' managers. In order to obtain detailed information on shopping patterns, and to compare the use of suburban shops with visits to the city centre and other shops, a random sample of 95 Milson shoppers was interviewed in their homes (Appendix B).

    View record details
  • Commerce Review: 1869–1969 Centennial of the University of Otago

    (1969)

    Book
    University of Otago

    The Otago Commerce Students' Association is pleased to present this magazine, The " COMMERCE REVIEW," in the Centennial Year of the University of Otago, as a record of the development and progress since its inception in 1912, of the Faculty of Commerce. It is perhaps important as a precedent for there is to date, no similar documentation… FROM THE PRESIDENT This magazine, the brainchild of the 1968 Association Committee, is published this year as our contribution to the University Centennial celebrations. Depending upon popular demand, an annual publication may be produced in the future, as a year-book of light-hearted vein… THE FACULTY OF COMMERCE —A History and A Tribute By R. A. Sinclair History is marked in moments, and for the sake of indulgent readers, I have accorded emphasis on significant periods rather than providing yearly surveys of all the happenings. For those omissions, some inadvertent, some of necessity, I express my regrets. There are three parts: the foundations, the middle years, and the boom period in which we find ourselves now… THE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION By R. A. Strang and E. S. Edgar Founding to World War II The Otago University Commerce Faculty Students' Association was founded shortly after classes in commercial subjects began at the University in 1912. The first president was Mr Owen Wilkinson and the students were immediately involved in the sporting and other affairs of the University… EDUCATION FOR ACCOUNTANCY By 5. A. Valentine, B.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty at the University of Otago has played an important role in accountancy education in New Zealand. In Dunedin, a higher proportion of students entering the accountancy profession attend University and complete a Commerce Degree than in any other city in the country. The main reason for this situation is that the accountancy courses and teaching at the University have developed to meet the changing requirements of this modern age… THE CENTENNIAL OPEN LECTURE-JULY 24, 1969 MR S. J. R. CHATTEN THE ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ZEALAND By S. J. R. Chatten, F.I.A., A.C.I.I. (London) Many of the large financial institutions in N.Z. are celebrating their centenaries at about this time and it seems appropriate to address a gathering of commerce students at a lecture to mark the Centenary of the University of Otago, on the role of the financial institutions in the development of New Zealand… THE COMMERCE COURSE-RETROSPECT AND PROSPECT By T. K. Cowan, M.Com., F.C.A. The Commerce Faculty owes its beginnings to the initiative and vigour of some Otago men such as Mr Peter Barr who played a leading role in the sound establishment of the New Zealand Society of Accountants. Until quite recently, its main role was to provide education in professional subjects for those desiring admission to the accountancy profession. It did this very economically indeed through evening and early morning classes taught by part-time staff drawn from the accountancy and legal professions. The final examinations set by the University of New Zealand were really professional examinations set and marked by practising accountants and lawyers. Some 80-90% of the students were interested in attaining admission to the New Zealand Society of Accountants rather than in completing a degree in Commerce… GALLERY THE DEANS… SOME PROMINENT LECTURERS…

    View record details
  • The alleged absence of ubiquinone from elasmobranchs

    Daniel, Roy M.; Redfearn, E.R. (1966)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    It has recently been suggested (Diplock & Haslewood, 1964) that certain lower vertebrates such as elasmobranchs and crocodylians are lacking in ubiquinone. Also, in a study of the lesser-spotted dogfish (Scyliorhinus caniculus) (Class Elasmobranchii, Order Selachii) Diplock & Haslewood (1965) were unable to demonstrate the biosynthesisof ubiquinone. In view of the fact that in all other vertebrate species so far examined the presence of ubiquinone is well authenticated (Crane, 1965), including in such a closely related animal as the shark (Nazir & Magar, 1964), these results seemed somewhat surprising. However, in view of these findings it seemed that a study of the respiratory enzyme systems of these organisms might be worth while. As a preliminary to this work an investigation on the alleged absence of ubiquinone from elasmobranch tissues was carried out.

    View record details
  • Book reviews and Book notices

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Book reviews and Book notice from Volume 1, Number 1, 1967 of Earth Science Journal.

    View record details
  • Economic geology of the Waikato

    Kear, David (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The Waikato contributes between 20 and 25 per cent of New Zealand's mineral production. Aggregate from Mesozoic rocks ranges from good (greywacke) to poor (argillite), with detailed differences being related to the position of the deposit within the New Zealand Geosyncline. Tertiary sediments show rapid facies changes that are reflected in the variability of important coal and limestone deposits. Petroleum and natural gas prospects are marginal at best. Upper Cenozoic deposits include sand, ironsand, pumice, perlite, aggregate, and building stone. Ground water is of vital importance, and is warm or hot in some areas. Good clays are available.

    View record details
  • Rational descriptive classification of duricrusts

    Dury, G.H. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The term duricrust appears to be extending itself to include calcareous, gypseous, and saline crusts, in addition to crusts composed dominantly of silica and/or of sesquioxides of iron and aluminium, with or without significant contents of dioxides of manganese or titanium. This latter group can be distinguished as duricrusts proper. Its nomenclature is highly confused, and its classification, in writings in the English language, defective. The relevant problems can be resolved, at least in considerable part, by the introduction, adaptation, and extension of modern terms current in tropical pedology, to give a descriptive classification free of genetic implications. When content of SiO₂, Al₂O₃, and Fe₂O₃ is used as a primary basis for the classification of duricrusts proper, plots on a ternary diagram justify the recognition of seven named types in the fersiallitic range.

    View record details
  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents from Volume 3, Number 1, 1969 of Earth Science Journal.

    View record details
  • Volcanic ash beds in the Waikato district

    Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This report lies somewhere between the "pathfinder" variety and the completed account for the reason that the results of detailed mapping and identification are still being prepared for publication. For the younger beds less than 36,000 years we now know both the source and the distribution, but for the older ashes commonly referred to as the Hamilton ash, sources are unknown and a knowledge of distribution restricted to the Waikato district. The principal source is the Okataina volcanic centre with Taupo as a subsidiary (Healy, 1964; Thompson, 1964 :44), and on this information, current mapping into the Waikato district proceeds from the east. Under the circumstances of partly completed work it seems prudent to discuss relevant ash beds already known (Vucetich and Pullar, 1963:65-6; 1964:45-6) to introduce briefly current work by the same authors and by W. T. Ward, and then to relate all of this to previous work portrayed in a soil-forming ash shower map by Taylor (1953).

    View record details
  • Shore platforms and mass-movement: A reply

    McLean, R.F.; Davidson, C.F. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Implicit in Mr Wright's note on shore platforms and mass-movement is a criticism of our findings on the role of mass-movement in shore platform development along the Gisborne coastline, New Zealand (McLean and Davidson, 1968). The lack of explicit criticism makes any reply difficult; we are not rebuked on our own evidence, nor is any fresh evidence presented from the same area to make it necessary for us to change or modify our original views.

    View record details
  • Annotated bibliography of central North Island volcanic ash stratigraphy

    Tonkin, Philip J.; Pullar, W.A. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Prior to 1929 many observations had been published giving brief accounts of the volcanic ash deposits in various parts of the North Island but no detailed investigations were undertaken. With the incidence of Bush Sickness in the Central North Island mapping of the "ash soils" was undertaken as part of the investigations into the cause of this disease. The work done at this time was the beginning of our present understanding of ash stratigraphy. In this bibliography only papers relevant to the Central North Island ash-showers have been mentioned.

    View record details
  • Erosion by high intensity rainfalls in the lower Waikato

    Selby, Michael J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A high intensity rainstorm with rainfalls exceeding 10 inches in 24 hours on the Hunua Range is described, and some of its geomorphological and economic consequences discussed.

    View record details
  • Shore platforms and mass movement: a note

    Wright, L.W. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Shore platforms and mass movement phenomena are important elements in the coastal scenery of the British Isles. Both features are particularly well developed along the English Channel coast. Where mass movement is of major importance it tends to inhibit the exposure of shore platforms. Under certain conditions it may temporarily protect the platform from further erosion. The factors which encourage the formation of shore platform and mass movement differ. Mass movement appears to be a secondary process, and does not seem to participate directly in either the primary formation of the shore platform or in its subsequent evolution.

    View record details
  • A simplified levelling instrument: the A-frame

    Riley, S.J. (1969)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    A levelling instrument has been developed which permits work in a high degree of detail without field assistance.

    View record details
  • Tidal hydrology in Pegasus Bay

    Blake, G.J. (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Changes in the geomorphology of the coastal plain river mouths of Pegasus Bay over the last 100 years are considered. Comment is also made on estuarine sediment and flow, the difficulty of measuring these two quantities and the need to treat the estuarine channel of a river as an important part of the catchment.

    View record details
  • Coverpage and Contents

    Waikato Geological Society (1967)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Coverpage and Contents of Volume 1, Number 1, 1967 Earth Science Journal.

    View record details
  • The climatic character of the Auckland rural area

    Sparrow, Christopher J. (1968)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The characteristics of the climate of the rural area surrounding the Auckland urban area are discussed. Data used, is predominantly from published reports of the New Zealand Meteorological Service giving annual summaries of observations made at the various climatological, synoptic and rainfall recording stations. The mean characteristics of the area's climatic elements are considered together with their extremes. It is concluded that warm temperatures throughout the year, high humidity, variations in amount and. intensity of rainfall, prevailing westerly and infrequent easterly winds and high sunshine hours characterise the climate of this part of northern New Zealand.

    View record details