4,277 results for 2000, Masters

  • The world makers : one centre's approach to technology education with infants and toddlers

    Mortlock, Anita (2004)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Infants and toddlers are surrounded by technology. They observe and explore technological artefacts and the uses of them on a daily basis. Despite this, there is little research to guide teachers about what the technological interests, understandings and capabilities of infants and toddlers might be and how they might be supported and extended. Technology education is a relative/y new curriculum area and it has not yet been included in the literary discourse about infant and toddler educational programmes. This study aims to examine what the teachers at one childcare centre identify as the technology interests, understandings and capabilities of a small group of infants and toddlers. Video footage was taken of the infants and toddlers at work and play and segments were then shown to individual teachers during interviews. The children's assessment portfolios were examined and the teachers and families were invited to contribute further information. The sum total of this data was used to analyse and reflect on particular episodes of video footage. The technological interests, understandings and capabilities of both the children and the adults were seen to be integrally linked to the temporal, physical and interpersonal environments of the centre.

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  • Generational differences in work values, work-related outcomes and person-organisation values fit : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Cennamo, Lucy K (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Values are important constructs in guiding behaviour and enhancing motivation in the workplace. However, more research is required into generational patterns in work values, particularly as much of the information regarding age differences is based on stereotypes. The aim of this research was to investigate differences between the four generational groups currently in the workforce (Matures, Baby Boomers, Generation X and Baby Boom Echo), according to work values and the work-related outcomes of job satisfaction, affective organisational commitment and intention to leave. The study also examined how differing values may contribute to the perception of person-organisation values fit. An overall theoretical model of person-organisation values fit and outcomes was developed and then assessed for invariance across age using structural equation modelling. A sample of 504 Auckland employees completed a questionnaire (either online or via pencil and paper). Results indicated that the youngest generations (the Generation X and Echo group) placed more importance on status-related work values than the oldest generations (the Matures and Baby Boomers). The Echo group also placed more importance on having a social working environment than the Matures and Boomers. Freedom-related work values were also rated as being more important to the Echo group than any other generation. The two youngest generations showed greater intent to leave their organisations in the next 12 months compared with older groups. In terms of perceived fit between individual values and organisational values, Matures and Boomers reported better fit with extrinsic values than Generation X, and better fit with status-related values than the Echo group. The model of overall person-organisation values fit and outcomes was confirmed, and was invariant across groups, suggesting that the overall fit process was consistent across age. The findings from this study offer insight into possible areas for organisational intervention to enhance communication and acceptance between generational groups. Future areas of research are also suggested to improve understanding of this field.

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  • Interaction with text : a study of teachers' mediation of materials in mainstream and ESOL secondary school classrooms : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Second Language Teaching at Massey University

    Davey, Sarah Elizabeth (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The increasingly multi-cultural nature of New Zealand society is accompanied by burgeoning school enrolments of students whose first language is not English (called ESOL students in this study). Immigration, refugee movements, and the recruitment of international students for largely economic purposes, all contribute to this. Whilst many of these students are competent English speakers when they enrol at our schools, large numbers are not. In secondary schools, regardless of English language competence, most ESOL students are placed in mainstream classes for the majority of their timetable, with the addition of a relatively small amount of specialist English language tuition. How do both these mainstream and ESOL teachers address the language learning needs of these students? Because texts remain central to classroom teaching and learning, this study considers how teachers mediate texts with students. It has a particular focus on how this mediation contributes to the language learning environment for ESOL students in both mainstream and ESOL classes, using classroom observation as its primary source of data. This study reveals both predictable and unexpected results. It is not surprising that it finds extensive use of questioning by teachers in their mediation of texts. However, the value of copious recall or display questions for senior secondary school students is challenged by this study, and the importance is asserted of referential questioning to develop critical thinking skills in relation to text. The preponderance of teacher-dominated classrooms and classroom language is a disappointing finding of this study, especially because the study reveals that students say very little in such an environment. More collaborative and interactive teaching methods would help ESOL students use, and therefore learn, English more effectively. Thus the study finds a lot of class time invested in the use of texts, but comparatively little effective mediation to help both native-speaking and ESOL students comprehend the language of the texts. The study reveals the need for teachers to acknowledge their role as teachers of language, and especially to mediate texts with students by teaching reading strategies.

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  • The impact of patents on New Zealand's biotechnology and genetics services sectors

    Green, Aphra (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 155 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 151-155. University of Otago department: Law

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  • Customary international law in National Courts: a comparative analysis

    Bottermann, Uwe (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    88 leaves :maps (1 in pocket) plates ; 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 83-88. University of Otago department: Law. "October 2000"

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  • Generation X’ers’ values and how they perceive the New Zealand labour market

    Lavender, Erin (2000-07)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    My research was based around skilled Generation X employees and what they value in long-term employment relationships. Initially my research was looking at employee retention in organisations, I began an initial literature review on this topic but was swamped with information and found that I would need to narrow my research. One area that was not well understood in the literature was employee retention methods for different age groups. This prompted me to look at Generation X and what they value in employment relationships, as away to understand how to better suit their needs and hopefully illustrate the ways in which they can be retained. I also believed that understanding the New Zealand labour market and illustrating how things like the brain drain, the new psychological contact, and the idea of mobile careers maybe having an affect on organisations and individuals was important and may in some way could be tied to Generation X'ers values in employment relationships. I began my research with a literature review on what Generation X employees are said to value in employment relationships, the main themes that were illustrated by the literature were such things as feedback, training and development, balanced lifestlyes, and fun. I also reviewed literature on issues I thought were relevant to the New Zealand labour Market including the brain drain, the new psychological contract and the notion of mobile careers Once my literature review was complete I established a number of questions I wished to find answers to including: 1. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers are pertinent issues to managing/retaining Generation X? 2. Do Generation X'ers and their managers perceive that the brain drain, the new psychological contract, and the idea of mobile careers exists in the context of the New Zealand labour market? 3. What effect do they perceive these things have on the New Zealand labour market? 4. Do these things affect them personally? 5. What do graduate Generation X workers value in long-term employment relationships? 6. Do these Generation X employees perceive the organisation they work for as being able to understand their values?

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  • Open market share repurchases in New Zealand

    Henderson, George (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    When a firm repurchases its own common stock, it buys back a proportion of its own equity from existing shareholders. For open market transactions the stock is acquired at market value and in an efficient market the transfer should not change shareholders' wealth. However, empirically, such corporate activity in American markets is generally associated with stock price increases and, consequently, increases in remaining shareholder wealth. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of open market share repurchases on the share price of New Zealand firms. If any abnormal returns are identified then the hypotheses suggested by American studies will be investigated to see which, if any, hold for the New Zealand case.

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  • A comparison of IPOs from small and medium sized enterprises: China vs Australia

    Ze, Tian (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    The general market behaviour of unseasoned new issues of Chinese A-shares and Australian common stock at the time of first day trading on respective stock exchanges is investigated, presenting a time-series analysis of the monthly volume and average initial returns on initial public offerings over a certain period of time. Also, the correlation of volume and underpricing among different groups of companies according to their size is studied. The underpricing of new stock issue defined as initial returns is widespread. The scale is extreme, especially on both the Shanghai Securities Exchange (SHSE) and Shenzhen Stock Exchange (SZSE) of China. The percentage of IPOs for small and medium sized enterprises is increasing in China and decreasing in Australia on average during the period presented in this paper. The results show that there is no significant difference in size between the companies listed on SHSE and SZSE in terms of total asset or revenue.

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  • A curriculum for e-Business education

    Tham, Wai Loong (2000-12)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    This is a digital copy of the thesis that is stored on an accompanying CDRom. It is not a full and exact duplicate of the print version of the thesis

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  • Accord and satisfaction by way of full settlement cheque

    Currie, Simon Colin (2007)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 225 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "November 4, 2007". University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Living in the city ain't so bad : cultural diversity of South Auckland rangatahi : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of a Masters of Philosophy in Psychology

    Borell, Belinda (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Establishing a 'secure' Maori identity based solely on particular criteria of Maori culture (te reo Maori, tikanga, marae, etc.) continues to be problematic for some Maori. Those who are not seen as connected in this way are often defined by what they are seen as lacking, hence terms such as disconnected, distanced, detached and dissociated. Although young Maori may define themselves in terms of difference from others there is an increasing danger of some urban youth being defined as different from Maori who are 'culturally connected' and for this to be seen primarily as a negative demarcation. Although it may be the aspiration of some to have greater cultural connection, what this means for different groups and individuals may have both congruence and divergence with what are usually considered to be markers of cultural inclusion. This thesis presents the findings from a wider research project funded by the Health Research Council of New Zealand. The project objective was to gather data that can inform and contribute to existing knowledge about cultural identity of rangatahi Maori with a view to establishing a framework(s) for greater youth development and a more positive and embracing perspective of culture. Kaupapa Maori and social constructionist framings are used to centre the focused life story interviews that were conducted with young people aged between 13-21 years, who identified as Maori and lived in the South Auckland area. Findings suggest that conventional and experiential indicators of Maori identity as well as a strong localised identity are key factors in this exploration. Challenges for identity theorists, societal institutions and other Maori are discussed.

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  • Having their say : six Pacific girls talk about their experiences in a New Zealand secondary school : a thesis completed in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Second Language Teaching at Massey University, Palmerston North

    Bell, Zana (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The problems faced by Pacific students in the New Zealand education system have been examined over the years, but very often the analysis of learning problems has been complicated by factors associated with wider issues such as socio-economic background (for instance, Hawk & Hill, 1996). The participants in this present study generally come from professional backgrounds, have succeeded well in their home schools and are studying in New Zealand on scholarships. They live in the secure environment of a hostel where after-school study is actively provided for. Thus, by removing socio-economic and home factors from the situation, it is possible to focus more on the learning situation itself. The factors that contribute both positively and negatively to the learning situation are explored by following the progress of six, secondary school girls through an academic year; four were new arrivals to New Zealand and two were in their second year here. Through a series of interviews, the year is seen through their eyes, as closely as possibly describing the girls' experiences as they saw them. Teachers are also interviewed, their interpretation of the classroom situation presenting interesting points of comparison and contrast to the girls' perceptions. The results of this study indicate that both teachers and students can underestimate the problems faced by Pacific students. The teachers, misled by the students' very fluent communicative ability, are not sufficiently aware of the problems that the students face when working with academic English. Further, the girls' quiet demeanour in class can be interpreted as passivity or lack of ability. The students on the other hand, applying their own cultural experiences to a New Zealand classroom, misunderstand the rules in play. They see nothing to emulate in the New Zealanders' behaviour, yet are frustrated and bewildered when these students do better than them. Academic expectations in New Zealand are different and the extent of these differences are not fully appreciated by either teachers or students and require greater changes both in teacher delivery and in student study habits. There are also affective factors such as leaving home, culture shock and stress which can further impede learning. The study maps the factors that appear to contribute most as constraints on learning and proposes a two-way model which recognises and addresses these factors. Additionally, it makes some recommendations for schools, recognising not only the constraints but also the factors that appear to facilitate learning. The study suggests that in proposing this model, it may be possible to better understand the learning situations of other Pacific students which are currently often overshadowed by socio-economic concerns

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  • Current diagnosis and treatment practices for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder with children : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Kingi, Denise (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a condition that affects many children and their families. Given the severity and pervasiveness of ADHD, diagnosis requires a thorough and comprehensive evaluation procedure along with multimodal treatment strategies tailored to the specific needs of the individual child. The present study aimed to identify the current diagnostic and treatment practices for ADHD with children to ascertain their consistency with current scientific research and recommendations. Additionally, the study aimed to highlight cultural issues surrounding the diagnosis of ADHD with Maori and Pacific Islands children. The research was conducted in two stages consisting of two separate samples. First, data were collected from parents/guardians of 47 children currently diagnosed with ADHD via survey based questionnaires. Second, information was elicited, also via questionnaires, from practitioners who provided data for 19 of the children participating in the stage one of the study. Overall, findings from the present study reveal inconsistent application of the recommended diagnostic procedures as well as discrepancies between parent and practitioner reports. In addition, results clearly identified stimulant medication as the main treatment prescribed for children with ADHD. However, the establishment of appropriate ongoing monitoring for treatment effectiveness and possible side effects was lacking. The underuse of systematic behavioural treatments evident from the findings is of concern given that empirically-based literature emphasises the importance of multimodal therapy. Cultural differences identified in the study are discussed and limitations of the research are noted, along with suggestions for future research.

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  • Student procrastination : a clarification and longitudinal analysis of its relationship to perfectionism, locus of control, and stress in university students : a research project presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Towers, Andrew James (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The current study sought to clarify the conflicting relationships between student procrastination and three academically related measures of personality: perfectionism, locus of control, and perceived stress. The study also examined the nature of these relationships in a longitudinal assessment over the course of a university semester. 213 first year undergraduate students (146 females and 67 males) completed the Aitken Procrastination Inventory, the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Academic Locus of Control Scale, and the Perceived Stress scale within the first four weeks of a university semester, and again one week before the end of semester examination period. High procrastination at both the start and the end of the semester was related to an external academic locus of control and low levels of self-oriented perfectionism. Stress and socially prescribed perfectionism had little relationship to levels of procrastination at both the start and the end of the semester. Only academic locus of control was elevated at the end of semester. Only academic locus of control was elevated at the end of semester as compared with the start of semester. The only significant predictor of end of semester stress levels was a high level of socially prescribed perfectionism at the start of the semester. The results were discussed with regard to the personalizing of academic control, the retraining of maladaptive causal attributions, the procrastinators 'last minute rush' theory, and the implications of these factors for future procrastination intervention strategies.

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  • Manoeuvre warfare theory and the tactical level of war : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy (Humanities) in Defence and Strategic Studies at Massey University

    Corbett, Trent (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis will determine the degree to which contemporary Manoeuvre Warfare theory is appropriate at the tactical level of war. In order to arrive at a basic working definition of Manoeuvre Warfare, it will draw mainly on material from the US Marine Corps. Contemporary military doctrine acknowledges the existence of three levels of war, the strategic, operational, and tactical. This was not always the case, as the operational level is a very new construct. Manoeuvre Warfare emerged as a response to the need to link the tactical and strategic levels that resulted in the inception of the operational level. While conceived at the operational level, Manoeuvre Warfare has been applied to all three levels of war. This thesis examines the context of Manoeuvre Warfare, and looks at how the US Marine Corps defines this doctrine. It then defines the three levels of war and looks at the main examples used to support manoeuvre theory before investigating the application of manoeuvre theory at the tactical level of war. This thesis will show that some key aspects of Manoeuvre Warfare are not actually appropriate at the tactical level

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  • A grounded theory study of depression in a sample of men participating in a clinical trial examining the effect of a dietary supplement on depression : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for a degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Palmerston North

    Watts, Peter Murray (2002)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Male depression is one of the most misunderstood and under diagnosed disorders in psychology today. Recent research examining male depression has suggested that this misunderstanding is due to an over reliance on positivist research practices. In addition the application of homogenous theories of depression developed from research using predominantly female samples to understand depression in males has clouded the area. In light of this research there have been calls to examine masculine depression, by looking at the experiences of affected males, using a qualitative methodology. The primary objective of the present study was to conceptualise depression based on the experiences of affected males using a grounded theory methodology. The sample consisted of 31 New Zealand males participating in a 12-week, double blind, placebo controlled trial examining the effectiveness of dietary supplementation as an adjunct to usual therapy in the treatment of depression. The basic social process emerging from the men's lived experience of depression involved participants developing a personal paradigm of depression. The development of this paradigm influenced the way the men understood and managed their depression. It evolved with the accumulation of experiential knowledge of their distress, which included experiencing the symptoms of depression, using personal coping strategies, experiencing the build up of depression, and receiving professional treatment. The implications of these findings for researchers and clinicians working in the area of male depression are discussed.

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  • Assessment of competency status of residential mental health support workers : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Morrison, Niall (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present study explored the current competency status of residential mental health support workers (n=121). Competency was assessed through the domains of skills, attitudes and perception of the work environment. Consistent with a recovery model, the National Mental Health Workforce Development Coordinating Committee (1999) put forward 10 basic core competencies that they recommended that all mental health workers should be able to demonstrate in their work practice. Skills and attitudes self-report measures were developed to assess participant performance on these competencies. In addition, a standard measure (Ward Atmosphere Scale) was utilised to evaluate the perceived atmosphere of the participants' work environment. The aggregated results of this study appeared to show that participants were generally competent in a number of areas of work practice. However, deficiencies in critical areas of client support were identified on closer examination of the data. With regard to participants' reported skills, shortcomings were found in particular in the core competencies knowledge, assessment and intervention. Similar deficits were found regarding participant attitudes with shortcomings found in the core competencies knowledge, culturally appropriate practice, assessment and safe/ethical practice. While superior education and training did appear to influence performance on certain competencies, some deficiencies were nevertheless reported by the more highly educated and trained participants. In addition, participants generally characterised their work settings in a very negative manner such that it appears that many settings are not adhering to the philosophies of rehabilitation and recovery. Despite the identification of deficiencies, many participants did demonstrate a number of competencies combined with a commitment to professional growth. In fact, one of the most positive findings in this study was the importance practically all the participants placed on promotion of their own professional growth.

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  • Blueprint for defence : Labour-Alliance defence policy and the Inquiry into defence beyond 2000 : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Defence and Strategic Studies at Massey University

    Krogt, Francis van der (2001)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    New Zealand's defence policies and the New Zealand Defence Force's (NZDF) military capabilities have long been the subject of vigorous public debate. At the centre of the debate have been questions over the need to retain military capabilities usually associated primarily with fighting wars, rather than performing tasks of a lower intensity. This debate reaches a crescendo whenever these capabilities require restoration or upgrading. In the late 1980s and throughout the 1990s, the plans to replace the Royal New Zealand Navy's Leander class frigates with ANZAC class frigates and the Royal New Zealand Air Force's Skyhawk fighters with F-16s occasioned some of the most sustained and bitter disagreements that New Zealand has ever seen. Underlying the debate over capabilities are deeper divisions over a range of issues, such as the appropriate role for the NZDF when the odds in the short to medium term of an attack on New Zealand are so slight. Defence policy statements under successive National-led Governments during the 1990s argued that despite the absence of a military threat, New Zealand's defence policy should be premised on the possibility that a serious military contingency affecting New Zealand's interests could occur well before New Zealand could raise forces to meet the threat - hence the need to retain the widest possible range of options even in times of relative peace.2 2 New Zealand Ministry of Defence, 1996 Defence Assessment, Wellington, 1996, pp.1, 23. It was further argued that other useful objectives would be met by this policy. Critics of this position argue that defence policy would be eminently more useful if it were to concentrate on meeting challenges and performing tasks that can be more confidently expected in the short to medium term. Peacekeeping is often said to be foremost among these tasks. [From the introduction]

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  • A case study of the implementation of learning styles in two primary school classrooms : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Educational Administration at Massey University

    McCallum, Jeannette Frances (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The aim of the National Curriculum is to: Seek to raise the achievement levels of all students and to ensure that the quality of teaching and learning in New Zealand schools is of the highest international standard. (Ministry of Education, 1993) However, current assessment of children's achievement in the New Zealand education system suggests that not all children are successful learners, despite restructuring of the education system and recent curriculum reform. Educational statistics indicate the aim of the National Curriculum is not being achieved. International mathematics results from the Ministry of Education (1997) Third International Maths and Science Study, state that New Zealand has scored below the international average at Year 5 and Year 8 levels. In Ministry of Education (1996) National Education Monitoring Project, non-Maori students performed better than Maori students in all ten Reading and Speaking tasks at Year 4 and six of ten tasks at Year 8 level. Ten years after 'Tomorrow's Schools' Wylie (1999) reports that children from low-income homes and Maori children have gained least from the reforms (p. 7). It therefore seems reasonable that other options for improved student achievement need to be considered. Although there is extensive literature in the U.S.A. about the effectiveness of the Learning Styles approach, there has been little research conducted in New Zealand primary schools. This study reports on the experience of three classes of primary school children (a Year 4 and 5 class for term 4 in 1998 and two Year 3 and 4 classes in 1999) where the teachers attempted to match instruction, learning context and children's preferred learning styles. The study focuses on the following questions: 1. Does knowing one's learning style improve students' learning? 2. To what extent is learning improved when instruction and learning context matches students' learning styles? 3. What are the principal difficulties in implementing learning styles in classrooms, as perceived by teachers? The case study concludes, from the perceptions of children and teachers, that matching learning styles with instruction and learning context does improve learning, especially for those children who underachieve or who learn differently. However, the two teachers report that although they consider the learning style theory is valid and is seen to improve learning and teaching, practicalities of implementation are problematic. Implementing a new teaching methodology is not a simple process. Effective implementation of learning styles requires a paradigm shift in teachers' ideology from teacher-centred to child-centred learning. Whether this paradigm shift is possible within our current educational system, driven by 'New Right ideology' and the traditional concept of a state primary school, is discussed. The study focuses on three issues in the implementation of learning styles: the need for a paradigm shift; school culture and management structures; and, understanding how teachers develop expertise. The study suggests directions for further research, including an action research study to implement a school wide initiative to cater for students learning through their preferred learning styles. Further research could focus on the process of implementing methodological innovations through analysing the institutional setting; its structures, cultures, management styles and practices. Research that focuses on a whole school, as opposed to a single classroom, may provide insight into greater understanding of implementation of changes and achieving a paradigm shift from 'traditional' to 'modern' teaching methodologies.

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  • The mediating role of workplace relationship and communication satisfaction on the relationship between e-mail attitude and organisational commitment : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University (Albany)

    Marchant, Lynette K (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    As an exploratory piece of research, this study investigated the use of e-mail by university staff and examined the relationship between e-mail attitude and organisational commitment. The mediating role on the attitude-commitment relationship by both satisfaction with overall communication and satisfaction with workplace relationships was also examined. A questionnaire was designed which incorporated Minsky and Marin's (1999) scale of Social and Nonsocial Uses of Electronic Messaging Systems, measures of satisfaction with the use of e-mail and with e-mail as a communication medium, Meyer and Allen's (1993) revised Organisational Commitment Scale, and subscales from Hill, Bahniuk and Dobos' (1989) Mentoring and Communication Support Scale and Furnham's (1996) Organisational Climate Questionnaire. A scale to measure e-mail attitude was developed specifically for this study using the tri-component model of attitude theory. The questionnaire was sent to all staff at Massey University's Albany and Palmerston North campuses (N = 2253). Of the number sent, 575 were returned, with a proportional representation from the two campuses and the five colleges of the university. Use of e-mail was found to be predominantly used for task related purposes, with administration being the most commonly reported function that e-mail was used for. Factor analysis demonstrated three underlying components, affective, behavioural and cognitive, of the E-mail Attitude Scale. A series of hierarchical multiple regressions as outlined by Baron and Kenny (1986) were conducted to explore the potential mediating effects of both communication satisfaction and workplace relationship satisfaction. Communication satisfaction completely mediated the relationship between affective attitudinal component and both normative and affective organisation commitment. In turn, the satisfaction with workplace relationship variables partially mediated the relationship between the affective attitude component and affective commitment, with only collegial social support partially mediating the relationship between affective e-mail attitude and normative commitment. The results are discussed in relation to relevant demographic variables. Limitations and potential directions for future research are also highlighted.

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