107 results for 2000, Undergraduate

  • Loving our national parks to death

    Mann, Amber (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 91 leaves :col. ill., plan ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • Desperate measures : murder, marriage and the media, 1900-1939

    McNair, Alexandra (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    91 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy). "1 October, 2003."

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  • Alpine fault pseudotachylytes

    Ritchie, Samuel David (2009)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    xvii, 171 leaves :col. ill., maps30 cm Includes bibliographical references. "October 2009". University of Otago department: Geology

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  • Domestic disquiet? : New Zealand responses to conflict in Malaya/Malaysia 1954-1966

    Sargison, Georgina (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 89 leaves, [9] leaves of plates :ill., facisms., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 84-89. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies

    Woodcock, Richard James (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Australia is shifting towards a knowledge-based economy. Even though there is an increasing emphasis on intellectual capital by Australian firms there is no mandatory intellectual capital disclosure standard. This suggests that what intellectual capital information Australian companies disclose is done voluntarily. This study examines whether this voluntary intellectual capital disclosure is occurring and whether a company’s characteristics influence the level of its intellectual capital disclosure by proposing two research questions. Firstly, what is the extent and content of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies? And secondly, what firm-specific characteristics are determinants of voluntary intellectual capital disclosures by Australian companies? Content analysis is used to gather data on intellectual capital disclosure levels and content of a sample of seventy listed Australian companies. Analysing the descriptive statistics of this data addresses this study’s first research question. In order to attend to the second research question five firm-specific characteristics are examined, industry classification, ownership concentration, leverage, listing age, and auditor type. Five hypotheses propose whether these five independent variables have an association with the level of intellectual capital disclosures or not. To operationalise the level of intellectual capital disclosure, as a dependent variable, the data gathered from the content analysis is utilised to calculate a disclosure index. Correlation and multiple regression analyses are performed to statistically test the five hypotheses. This study found that there is a limited awareness by Australian companies towards intellectual capital disclosures. The levels of intellectual capital disclosures were reasonably low and there was also inconsistency of the level of disclosure among firms. In terms of the content of disclosures, external capital was found to be the most frequently disclosed category of intellectual capital. This finding was consistent with previous intellectual capital disclosure studies in the Australian context. Through statistical testing, this study found that companies that operate in high intellectual capital intensive industries, and companies with a Big Four auditing firm disclose greater levels of intellectual capital information. It was found that a company’s ownership concentration, leverage level, and listing age do not influence its intellectual capital disclosure behaviour. The results of this study extend the scant research in this area of accounting, and they also provide practical implications for Australian accounting standard regulators.

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  • IC3:Information and Communication integration using VCoIP between 3 collaborating parties

    Sun, Jian (2006-10)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    This study develops a new communication and collaboration supported tool – IC3. In particular, this tool is an integration of open source video conference over internet protocol (VCoIP) and virtual network computing (VNC) projects. This integrated system supports both virtual communication and collaborated web information sharing. In addition, it aims to facilitate greater eye contact and seating arrangements. The results from a set of heuristic evaluations show that the IC3 system is an effective communication and collaboration tool, and it does improve users’ eye contact and feeling of sitting around a table.

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  • Global sourcing in New Zealand manufacturing firms: A quantitative investigation

    Davidson, Bethany (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Global sourcing is a resource acquisition strategy that has created much interest in recent years. As firms strive to remain competitive in an increasingly challenging business environment, many have looked for suppliers outside of their home country in order to develop competitive advantages in their domestic markets. Prior research has shown that significant benefits can be gained from the international integration and co-ordination of their purchasing activities. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate the incidence and application of global sourcing in New Zealand manufacturing firms. A review of the literature relating to the philosophy of supply chain management (SCM) provides the foundation for a discussion of global sourcing. The global sourcing literature focuses heavily on foreign countries, particularly the United States of America. This investigation aims to improve the deficiency that exists in this area, by examining global sourcing within a different context. A quantitative research method in the form of a web-based survey was conducted in this investigation. The data that was obtained from the survey was statistically analysed and a number of results were gained. These results were then discussed and reconciled with the literature with the purpose of determining whether they are consistent with what has already been established. Three key findings of this investigation are highlighted. Firstly, the level of global sourcing strategy pursued by New Zealand manufacturing firms is low, which may indicate a limited ability or need to carry out higher, sophisticated levels of global sourcing strategy. Secondly, New Zealand manufacturing firms have been motivated to pursue global sourcing primarily by 'cost reductions / price benefits'. This reflects the extent to which less expensive labour, less restrictive work rules and lower land and facility costs have enticed many to look at global suppliers. Finally, the major barriers that have caused difficulties for New Zealand manufacturing firms in their pursuit of global sourcing have been identified as 'exchange rate fluctuations' and 'longer lead times and lengthened material pipelines'. This reflects the impact that market uncertainties and geographical isolation can have on the ability of firms to successfully pursue global sourcing.

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  • Corporate culture as normative control: A study of Hong Kong employees in a team-based organisation

    Lo, Wattle C W (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Corporate culture is a form of normative control (Fleming & Stablein, 1999; Kunda, 1992). Normative control can be described as a system of control that "works internally by engendering people with subjective attributes and dispositions, which are compatible with the maintenance of certain types of work organisation" (Fleming & Stablein, 1999:3). Since the early period of capitalist mode of production, corporate managers have been searching for effective techniques to control their workplace activities. Over the past two centuries, corporate control strategy had been changing according to economic conditions, technology, culture, and business nature. Edwards (1979) in his book Contested Terrain suggested that many large corporations had shifted their strategy from the simple forms of control to technical, and gradually bureaucratic administration, as a result of the growing need for efficiency and productivity (Barley & Kunda, 1992; Edwards, 1979). The use of assembly lines, cost accounting systems, and bureaucratic rules — in short, the utilitarian forms of control — were the key principles of organising production from 1900 to the 1930 (Barley & Kunda, 1992). Culture as a form of control strategy remained unfamiliar to many management scholars and practitioners until the late 1970s. Influenced by anthropology and sociology, corporate culture came to prominence in 1980, and entered into managerial discourse (Barley & Kunda, 1992). Thereafter, managerial interest in building corporate cultures caused a proliferation of organisation literature ranging broadly from popular business magazines to commercial management books (Barley & Kunda, 1992). Famous writers, such as Peters and Waterman (1982), Deal and Kennedy (1982), and Ouchi (1981), excitedly urged business managers to cultivate strong corporate cultures that harness loyal, committed, and hardworking employees (Barley & Kunda, 1992). They criticised that traditional forms of corporate control will eventually eliminate certain human attributes – for example, commitment, flexibility, creativity etc. – that are crucial for enhancing business performance in a fast-changing environment (Barley & Kunda, 1992). In In Search of Excellence, Peters and Waterman advised, "all that stuff you have been dismissing for so long as the intractable, irrational, intuitive, informal organisation can be managed" (Peters & Waterman, 1981:11). They argued that corporate cultures, which centre on principles such as cultivating workplace values, employee motivation, autonomy, organisational commitment, and team building, are the key to success in contemporary business (Peters & Waterman, 1982). Corporate culture is increasingly recognised as an important means of controlling workplace activities. The gain in popularity of cultural management' in recent decades has marked the point of departure from classical to contemporary management philosophy. As a novice researcher, my interest in corporate culture stems from two propositions. First, corporate culture as a form of normative control is amazingly effective for promoting teamwork2 in organisations. Proponents argue that culture building cultivates a shared meaning and purpose among team members (Fleming & Stablein, 1999), harnessing their commitment and energy towards efficiency and productivity. As a result, members are more willing to share their experience and knowledge with their counterparts, facilitating cooperation and mutual accountability (Cadwell, 1997). Promoting teamwork requires the manipulation of team values, norms, and beliefs, so that members become much more loyal and devoted to the team and organisation (Fleming & Stablein, 1999). This manipulation is achieved through designing workplace activities, ranging from daily communications to corporate meetings, training sessions, and peer gatherings. Managers design the ways in which these activities are performed and employees are responsible for the maintenance of those activities (Cadwell, 1997). They learn about team values through their participation in socialising with others. Once members have internalised these values, they come to discipline themselves in teams without the need for managerial control. Second, my interest in corporate culture also lies in the premise that this form of control is not as perfect as it has been generally envisaged. Although corporate culture is effective in fostering team spirit in organisations, members nonetheless experience intense peer pressure among themselves (Ezzamel & Willmott, 1998). Not only are members under constant supervision by their counterparts, but also are required to actively monitor their own team performance (Ezzamel & Willmott, 1998). Peer competition is intense. Some opponents, such as Kunda (1992) and Casey (1995), argued that team members, in fact, do not gain a sense of empowerment, ownership, and participation. Rather, they often experience negative emotions such as ambivalence, anxiety, fear, and pressure (Kunda, 1992; Casey, 1995). Further, employees' resistance to managerial practices of team building is a common phenomenon in the contemporary workplace (Collinson, 1994). Depending on different situations, the intensity of their resistance can range from a simple tactic of indifference to an active endeavour of manipulating critical information (Collinson, 1994). These issues challenge the utopian presuppositions of a team culture, and raise doubts about its effectiveness as a form of normative control. The two stories above have evoked my desire for thinking about team building in the context of Hong Kong — a place in which I grew up. As most current research on team culture is primarily conducted in large corporations in the U.S., such bias further stimulates my interest in finding out how Western knowledge may be applied to understanding Hong Kong people in the workplace. This is perhaps also due to the fact that I, as a research student from Hong Kong, recognise some irreducible differences between Western and Chinese cultures. Of course, these cultural differences cannot be simply reduced to a simple distinction between East and West. As it is well known, Hong Kong was a British colony with strong Chinese characteristics (which I will discuss in the second chapter). This uniqueness of Hong Kong raises questions about the typical Western view on the implications of a team culture for the employee. It forces me to ask: if Hong Kong is presumably neither a Western nor Chinese city, what are the likely problems when trying to make sense of the employee based on Western assumptions? Does a team culture have the same effects on the Hong Kong employee as those on the American? Is Western management knowledge universally applicable to every culture context? I attempt to address these questions by studying one of the branch offices of a leading British Insurance company in Hong Kong. My research study specifically focuses on both Quality Assurance and Corporate Culture as Normative Control Human Resource departments. The Quality Assurance department has a particular emphasis on teamwork, and is run by four Hong Kong staff. Three other employees of the Human Resource department are included in my study. They are the people who actively promote teamwork in the organisation. For convenience, I will call the Hong Kong branch office "ABI", the Quality Assurance department "QA", and the Human Resource department "HR".

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  • International trade and employment in French and West German manufacturing industries

    Chetwin, William (2000-10-09)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    The debate over the implications of international trade for the labour market is a prominent one both among economists and the general population. Because of that fact, and because of the absence of a comprehensive economic theory that explains the implications of trade for labour, empirical study is needed to provide a basis for the development of theory and to provide an objective basis for making policy decisions. This study aims to fill a gap in the literature by studying each of eight manufacturing industries individually, rather than pooling these together into an aggregate study as is the case in much previous work. Using data on two-digit ISIC (International Standardized Industrial Classification) manufacturing industries in France and West-Germany for the period 1970-1991, it estimates a labour demand equation for each of the eight industries and includes indicators of trade as explanatory variables. The first of the two main conclusions is that trade appears to have an effect on employment over and above its indirect effects through output, wages, and other variables. The second main conclusion is that this effect differs across industries. The implication of these conclusions is that previous studies which pool disaggregate data to look at the manufacturing industry in the aggregate may fail to provide important information about how individual industries adjust. This means that their predictions may not provide useful information on the partial equilibrium effects of trade and trade policy, and because they say little about how firms or industries adjust they do not provide useful information for the development of further theory in this area. The overall implication of this study is that more work should be carried out to ascertain the effects of trade on the labour market at a disaggregate level. Recommendations are made regarding the issues to be considered in undertaking further study in this area, and regarding approaches that should be taken in order to provide information for the development of theory, and in order to obtain results that improve the information sets of policy makers.

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  • The hill of health : aspects of community at Waipiata Sanatorium 1923-1961

    Haugh, Susan Margaret (2005)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    102 leaves, [21] p. of plates :ill., facsim., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 101-102.

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  • The geology of the Round Hill area, upper Hakataramea Valley

    Falconer, Mark Lloyd (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    viii, 79 [7] leaves ; 26 cm. Bibliography: l. [84-86] University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Research on theoretical framework and implementation of Local Government Act 2002

    Li, Xiaotong (Bob) (2006)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Focusing on the Special Consultative Procedure (SCP), Long Term Council Community Plan (LTCCP) and LTCCP audit processes, this research studies the underlying theories and assumptions of Local Government Act (LGA) 2002’s theoretical framework. A case study is conducted in Dunedin to test whether the implementation of LGA 2002 in practise is consistent with its theoretical framework. Research results indicate that many theories and assumptions behind LGA 2002’s theoretical framework are not valid. The gap between SCP, LTCCP and LTCCP audit causes difficulties in implementing LGA 2002. Empowering communities, the ultimate purpose of LGA 2002, has not been realised. However, improvement of LGA 2002 implementation is expected when SCP, LTCCP and LTCCP audit become more efficient in the future.

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  • Kia tū ko taikākā: Let the heartwood of Māori identity stand - An investigation into the appropriateness of the legal definition of ‘Māori’ for Māori

    Coates, Natalie (2008)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the degree of Bachelor of Arts (Honours), in Māori Studies at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.

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  • The other class of women : maternity services available for destitute women in Dunedin, c.1886-1897

    McKay, Willow Reay (2002)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    98 leaves :ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Typescript (photocopy).

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  • Management and allocation of fresh water in New Zealand:

    Bartrum, Lisa Cherie (2004)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    93 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 69-80). University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Falling branches, dying roots? : bank branch closure in small towns

    McKirdy, Callum Blair (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iii, 140 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 134-140. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • A world of (linguistic) possibility : the rights-consistent interpretive directives of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the United Kingdom Human Rights Act 1998

    Fenton, Bridget (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 89 leaves :col. ill., maps (some folded) ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-89) University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Access to irrigation water : private property rights applied to water

    Milmine, Craig A. (2000)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    58 leaves, [3] leaves of plates :ill., maps ; 27 cm. University of Otago department: Geography.

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  • Parents, siblings and pacifism : the Baxter family and others (World War One and World War Two)

    Cumming, Belinda C. (2007)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    Before she died, Millicent Baxter, wife of notorious New Zealand conscientious objector Archibald Baxter, wrote a letter confessing one of her final wishes: “I hope to live long enough to see the production of the documentary of my husband's book, We Will Not Cease ... I think it has a message for the young. The future of the world is in their hands …” Clearly pacifism was a shared commitment in her family, not just the passion of one individual member. This essay will seek to explore the importance of family in a pacifist stance. I will examine influences of, and effects on, various members of the family unit, and investigate the importance of familial support in aiding a conscientious objector to take the pacifist stance and cope with the consequent hardships confronted. My dissertation examines both the first and second World Wars. This focus on the family distinguishes my research from scholarship which precedes it.(…)While available scholarship provides a significant wealth of detail on conscientious objection in New Zealand, this narrow focus on administration has led to neglect of the families of the pacifists, the people who actually felt the affects of the policies formulated by politicians in Parliament and who witnessed the persecution and punishment of their loved ones. Attention has not been paid to the role of the family and I endeavour to remedy this neglect. I wish to explore how the family members in both wars were affected by the pacifist stance adopted by men in their families, and how they responded. (…) The stand of a conscientious objector is 'a protest against war and leads inevitably to conflict with the State.' 3 When a man elected to object to war and go against prevailing opinion at the time, he was putting himself forward to be ostracised, harassed and abused by the community, and be punished officially by the Government. This radical and life-changing decision to be a conscientious objector would likely have been a gradual process of thought and debate during the objector's life, not a spontaneous snap decision. I wish to explore the role that upbringing played in this decision-making process, and to investigate the influence that parents consciously or sub-consciously had over their children's views regarding peace and war. (…) By focusing on the family in research regarding conscientious objection in New Zealand over both Wars, this dissertation sheds light on hitherto neglected areas of investigation, and gives a voice to mothers, fathers, siblings and children who have until now often remained unheard. [extract from Introduction]

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  • The political lessons of Tomorrow's schools : what can be learnt from the outcomes and implications of Tomorrow's schools

    Connew, Scott Joseph (2003)

    Undergraduate thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 64 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Political Studies. "October 2003."

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