4,983 results for Lincoln University Research Archive

  • Policy strategies for the implementaion of agroforestry in New Zealand

    Stupples, Liana G.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Agroforestry provides an opportunity to address many current land use problems. Despite its potential benefits agroforestry has not been extensively adopted as a land use in New Zealand. Assuming that a government might wish to promote the adoption of agroforestry by farmers this study provides strategies for the implementation of agroforestry in New Zealand. In order to create policy to influence adoption and realise the potential of agroforestry this study investigates the factors that determine farmers' adoption. A model of the innovation adoption decision process is proposed and used as a framework with which to discuss agroforestry adoption in New Zealand. Based on the approach that in order to create effective policy, strategies must be matched to the requirements at farmer level, policy strategies that fit the requirements of the farmer are suggested.

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  • Nature conservation: information, costs, and evaluation

    Cullen, R.

    Conference Contribution - Unpublished
    Lincoln University

    Public understanding of conservation is flawed in New Zealand and the level of threat to species and ecosystems is poorly understood. Pursuit of conservation goals is costly. We invest resources and effort to maintain specific species and return ecosystems to a former state by investing resources and effort. Selection of conservation projects needs to be based upon good understanding of their expected outcomes and projected costs. Efforts to conserve ecosystems should be evaluated to determine the effectiveness and efficiency of those actions. Practical, low cost evaluation techniques exist and can inform society about ecosystem conservation programmes. A New Zealand conservvision is for conservation decisions made by small groups of experts, based on estimated cost and projected outcomes that will conserve the dynamic nature of ecosystems.

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  • Papers presented at the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society (Inc.) eleventh Annual Conference : Tahuna Conference Centre, Nelson, August 2005

    Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Published on behalf of the New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society by Agribusiness and Economics Research Unit, Lincoln University, [2005].

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  • Development of environmental indicators for tourism in natural areas: a preliminary study

    Ward Jonet, C.; Beanland Ruth, A.

    Book
    Lincoln University

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  • Potatoes: a consumer survey of Christchurch and Auckland households

    Rich, M. M.; Mellon, M. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This report presents the results and conclusions from a consumer survey which was carried out in Christchurch and Auckland during January 1980. It was aimed at providing information on consumer purchasing and consumption patterns on potato, and factors affecting these patterns. It has been conducted under a contract with the New Zealand Potato Board to aid in the development of a marketing strategy for the 1980s.

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  • Demand prospects for beef

    Philpott, B. P.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Paper contributed to New Zealand Institute of Agricultural Science Symposium New Zealand Beef Production, Processing and Marketing’: Hamilton, August 24-28th 1970.

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  • New Zealand, The Ten, and future market strategies

    McCarthy, Owen

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    Photocopied material - reissue of Canterbury Chamber of Commerce economic bulletin, no. 559, published 1972.

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  • Perceptions of NZ's environment : do perceptions align with science?

    Hughey, K. F. D.; Cullen, R.; Kerr, G. N.

    Conference Contribution - Unpublished
    Lincoln University

    Discusses results and trends from the biennial survey of people's perceptions of the state of the New Zealand environment. The survey is based on the Pressure-State-Response model of state of the environment reporting. Illustrates differences between the scientific and the perceived state of New Zealand's environment.

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  • Postmodernism and landscape architecture

    Lister, G.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    Postmodernism is a broad based phenomena, which at once is a group of attitudes and theories, is to do with the condition of living in the contemporary world, and includes a concomitant range of styles and expressions in different fields of activity. In Landscape Architecture Postmodernism has been particularly associated with Participatory Design, Ecological Design, and Experimental or Contextual Design. However, reference to the more rigorous theory would encourage caution in simply attaching the label of Postmodernism to any or all of these. No explicit use has apparently been made of Postmodernism in New Zealand Landscape Architecture and there are few examples of postmodern trends in either theory or practice.

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  • Comparative economic performance of ARGOS kiwifruit orchards 2003/04 - 2007/08

    Greer, G.

    Conference item
    Lincoln University

    This presentation discusses the economic differences among kiwifruit orchards: green, organic and gold, which results is compared to sheep/beef sectors.

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  • Transport of Christchurch solid waste: road transport versus rail transport

    Schriiffer, B.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    This focus of this study is to analyse the logistics of solid waste transport from Christchurch (New Zealand) to the local landfill by comparing two scenarios - road versus rail transport. The thrust of the research is based on a triple bottom line approach that considers economic, environmental and community issues.

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  • Stewarts Gully

    Dyer, Jacqueline

    Creative work
    Lincoln University

    Major design project for Diploma in Landscape Architecture

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  • Determinants of farmland prices in a dynamic error correction form : a New Zealand case

    Dhungana, B. R.; Ward, B. D.; Nartea, G. V.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    This paper examines the effect of real net farm residual income, inflation, and the real interest rate on the movement of real farmland prices during 1970 to 1997 using a parsimonious error correction model. The empirical evidence suggests that the long run trend in the real land price can be explained by real net farm residual income to land and the real interest rate, with inflation having no statistically signifcant effect. However, the growth in the real interest rate explains about two thirds of the growth in land prices in the immediate to short-run.

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  • Evolving role of local government in promoting sustainable tourism development on the West Coast

    Cameron, A. M.; Memon, A.; Simmons, D. G.; Fairweather, J. R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The objective of this study is to examine the perspectives West Coast tourism stakeholders hold about the local government's emerging roles and responsibilities for tourism planning in the region. Local government authorities examined include the Buller, Grey and Westland District Councils, the West Coast Regional Council and Tourism West Coast, (the Regional Tourism Organisation, which forms the promotional 'arm' of the three District Councils). 'Tourism stakeholders' includes tourism-related businesses and NGOs as well as local government staff.

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  • Employment and unemployment in rural Southland

    Fairweather, John R.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The results from an interview survey of rural working age people in Southland are presented in this report, along with an overview of relevant domestic and international literature.

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  • An economic survey of New Zealand wheatgrowers : enterprise analysis : survey no. 8, 1983-84

    Lough, R. D.; McCartin, P. J.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    The National Wheatgrowers' Survey is an annual survey being undertaken by the Agricultural Economics Research Unit at Lincoln College on behalf of the Wheat Growing Sub-Section of Federated Farmers of New Zealand Inc. This report summarizes information collected from participating farmers for the 1983-84 wheatgrowing season.

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  • Marketing of agricultural and horticultural products : selected examples, apples, barley, summerfruit, wool

    Nicholson, K. B.

    Working or discussion paper
    Lincoln University

    This report provides insights into selected primary industries in New Zealand. The primary industries covered are apple, barley, summerfruit, and wool. Production, marketing, and organisation are examined, along with quality control and market trends.

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  • Business use of the internet in New Zealand: a follow-up study

    Abell, W.; Black, S.

    Book
    Lincoln University

    A survey of New Zealand businesses using the Internet was undertaken in 1995 and a follow-up survey carried out in 1996. Both surveys looked at current and expected uses, perceived benefits and problem areas of Internet use by business. Interesting results include: a substantial increase in providing on-line customer services, small and technology focused companies making more use of the Internet; and an increase in problems with the technology and Internet Service Providers.

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  • Managerial sex role stereotyping among Chinese students in New Zealand

    Zhu, D.

    Thesis
    Lincoln University

    The management literature in gender issues argues that in spite of the progress made in the last few decades, women still face difficulties in being accepted and recognised as managers because the manager’s role has been perceived as masculine. Gender stereotypes, hence, continue to become a barrier to women’s access to top management position. This study examines the perceptions of the relationship between sex role stereotypes and the perceived characteristics necessary for managerial success among Chinese students in New Zealand. The study sample consisted of 94 male Chinese students and 119 female Chinese students studying in New Zealand. In order to allow for cross-cultural comparisons, this study used a direct replication the Schein Descriptive Index (SDI) from previous study (Schein & Mueller, 1992). The male and female perceptions on the relationship between sex role stereotypes and characteristics were analysed separately. The results revealed that both male and female Chinese students in New Zealand perceive that successful middle managers possess characteristics, attitudes and temperaments more commonly ascribed to men than to women in general. In addition, the results were compared with previous studies conducted in China and Japan, New Zealand, America, Britain, Canada, and Germany. Our findings conclude that Asian people are worse than Western people in respect to managerial sex role stereotyping, particularly, Chinese males who show a very strong degree of managerial gender stereotyping. Multiple discriminant analysis was used to discriminate the relationship between men, women and middle managers on 92 items from the survey questionnaire. The analysis resulted in two separate canonical functions which distinguished between three groups women, men and managers).

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  • Planning education and the role of theory in the new millennium: a new role for habitat theory?

    Montgomery, R. L.

    Journal article
    Lincoln University

    In the last two decades of the twentieth century, planning pedagogy in New Zealand responded to broader intellectual and social trends, and, arguably, indirect political pressures, with a turn or return, depending upon one’s view of planning history, to matters of process. I would describe this as a retreat rather than return. For example, the widespread rhetoric around the introduction of the Resource Management Act (RMA) in 1991 was that management would now be effects-based. Rather than formulate prescriptive or proscriptive policies, planners were to concentrate instead on guaranteeing that the process of assessing, approving or rejecting applications, handling appeals and monitoring consents was conducted in an efficient, transparent and democratic manner. Consequently, in the planning practice literature of the 1980s and 1990s and the first several years of the new millennium, the main emphasis was on best practice guides or protocols. For example, in New Zealand the 2005 Urban Design Protocol, published by the Ministry for the Environment, argues that good urban design follows the “seven ‘c’s”: context, character, choice, connections, creativity, custodianship, and collaboration. While such principles have merit, they require what I would term the eighth ‘c’: content that operationalises the principles (i.e., what actually makes for durable urban design). Disappointingly, the Urban Design Protocol shies away from saying anything about what is good versus bad urban design.

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