291 results for ResearchSpace@Auckland, Masters

  • Evaluation of utilisation of the Prevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV Programme in Central province, Kenya

    Ngugi, Catherine Njeri (2013)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: The PMTCT HIV programme has been one of the most successful HIV preventive interventions towards HIV-free future generations. However, even though the programme is virtually effective in developed countries, many developing countries are reporting child HIV infections due to the MTCT. The programme has existed in Kenya for more than a decade, yet in 2011, 12,894children were HIV infected due to MTCT Objective: To evaluate the PMTCT programme, especially the HIV testing from the antenatal period to the postnatal period among expectant parents attending Nyeri Provincial General Hospital in Central Province, Kenya. Design: Retrospective analysis of the hospital registers. Methods: Three hospital registers were analysed for the period from July 2009 to September 2012. The registers were for antenatal, intrapartum and postnatal care respectively. Each register documented the utilisation of PMTCT services by the expectant parents. Descriptive and inferential statistics were produced to analyse data from the registers. Results: The PMTCT services utilisation was sub-optimal. Of the 504 expectant mothers who attended the antenatal clinic, 59.9% came once, 80.4% had their first visit in the third trimester (between weeks 28 and 40) and only 6.9% were accompanied by their partners. All the women were HIV tested in their first visit but only 12.1% were rescreened after three months, and only 3.8% had been tested prior to the current pregnancy (p=0.000). No expectant mother was tested for HIV intrapartum or postpartum. The children of the 504 mothers who were HIV tested were those whose parent/s were known to be HIV positive or who had presented to a child welfare clinic with recurring symptoms suggestive of a failing immune system. Conclusion: Public health programs need to strengthen the PMTCT and HIV prevention programmes to ensure that HIV testing preconception and in pregnancy is fully implemented and strengthened, alongside continued education of the public through community programmes and the media. To avert further horizontal and vertical transmission of HIV, there is a need to address urgently the identified missed opportunities in the PMTCT program. These programmatic challenges require health system redesign and strengthening, resource allocation, addressing research gaps and reassessing the current PMTCT policies.

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  • Maths Anxiety: Fact or Fiction

    Frankcom-Burgess, Gillian (2006)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Vitamin D and the burden of disease in New Zealand

    Grey, Corina (2008)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In search of the interdependent self : explorations among Baptist church members in Jamaica and the United States

    Frey, Rosemary (2004)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury among New Zealand Children: Improving Quality of Care in the Emergency Department Setting

    Sharpe, S (2009)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: To examine the occurrence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among New Zealand children and to investigate the quality of healthcare delivered in the emergency department (ED) setting to children with mild TBI. Methods: A systematic review of the literature regarding the occurrence of TBI among New Zealand children was undertaken alongside a clinical audit examining the quality of healthcare delivered to children with mild TBI who were discharged home after assessment in a children's hospital ED in 2007. Medical records of a random sample of 60 children aged <15 years stratified by ethnicity and age were reviewed. ED processes of care for mild TBI were compared with best practice standards derived from guideline recommendations. Findings: The systematic literature review revealed important gaps in knowledge regarding the burden of mild TBI among New Zealand children. The clinical audit identified that processes of care designed to manage potentially life-threatening acute complications (e.g. selection of children for CT scanning to identify intracranial haemorrhage) were consistent with best practice standards. However gaps existed between current and best practice for aspects of care that could minimise risks of disability. For example, despite a high standard of documentation of data required for estimating the probability of TBI, this information was not applied to clearly identify children with definite or possible TBI. In addition, documentation deficiencies raised concerns regarding whether information is provided in a manner supportive of the cultures and languages of families/wh?nau, missed opportunities for injury prevention advice, and the adequacy of follow-up plans in the community. Conclusion: The identified gaps in research knowledge and quality of care in the ED setting require attention to develop effective integrated services that minimise the risk of disability following childhood TBI.

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  • Das Unmittelbare Ansetzen Zur Tatbestandsverwirklichung Beim Versuch Gemäß §22 STGB

    Mandery, Maya (2008)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Special Court for Sierra Leone: Justice for whom?

    Mahony, Christopher (2007)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The thesis examined the divergence of conceptions of justice between civil society actors in Sierra Leone and personnel working at the Special Court for Sierra Leone.

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  • Novel red fluorescent proteins of the sea anemone Entacmaea quadricolor for in situ imaging of bacteria

    Dalton, James (2006)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Maori Women in Prison : Nga Wahine Ngaro

    Quince, Khylee (2009)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Major thesis assessing Corrections policy and practice in respect of Maori female inmates in New Zealand prisons.

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  • Myth busting and tenet building: Primary and early childhood teachers' understanding of the nature of science.

    Heap, R (2007)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    A fundamental objective of science education is to provide students with the level of scientific literacy necessary to participate in a society increasingly dependent on science and technology. Central to definitions of this scientific literacy is an appreciation of the nature of science (NOS). The purpose of the research project was to identify the understandings of NOS of a cohort of practising primary and early childhood teachers, enrolled in a semester long science course as part of a Bachelor of Education degree. The research sought to examine their initial NOS understandings and mapped these understandings over the duration of the course in order to identify shifts in understanding and aspects of NOS resistant to change. The research was embedded in critical social science methodology. An explicit reflective approach was used throughout the course instruction to teach NOS tenets. Two frameworks were developed to analyse the data gathered, a myths framework and a NOS framework. Analysis of the pre-instruction views showed that the teachers initial understandings of NOS were fragmented, lacking in depth, inconsistent, fluid and revealed many myths of NOS. Over the duration of the course the teachers journals showed shifts in understanding: NOS tenets were more frequently expressed; there was an increase in the complexity of expression; and an increase in the integration or interrelatedness of NOS tenets. Factors which contributed to these shifts in understanding included the use of an explicit approach, consistency between explicit and implicit instruction, reflection, a conceptual change approach and the use of generic science-content-free NOS activities throughout the course. These findings suggest a need for NOS to be addressed in both pre-service teacher education and in-service teacher professional development programmes. The research has indicated that an explicit, reflective teaching approach is pedagogically effective for this need.

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  • A Hierarchical Analysis of Trial of Labour in Ontario: Do women, doctors or hospitals choose?

    Wise, Michelle (2010-06)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Few studies have determined the contribution of maternity care provider and hospital factors to the variation in Trial of Labour (TOL) and successful TOL rates. Objective: To determine sources of variation in TOL and successful TOL rates at the provider and/or hospital level. Methods: Retrospective cohort study of 12,170 women with previous caesarean who gave birth in Ontario in 2007. Hierarchical linear model was used to determine variation in rates by provider and hospital characteristics, adjusting for maternal characteristics, and for clustering of data. Results: TOL rate was 23%; successful TOL rate 75%. Women attending family doctors and female doctors for prenatal care were more likely to have TOL. There were no provider factors associated with successful TOL. Women giving birth at teaching hospitals were more likely to have TOL and successful TOL. Conclusions: Policies aimed at prenatal care providers and hospitals could impact the low TOL rate.

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  • Talking our selves : Stories of identities and linguistic possibilities of bilingual teachers working in English medium early childhood services in the Auckland region.

    Harvey, Nola (2011)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This thesis examines the ways in which five bilingual teachers use their two languages in English-medium early childhood services in the Auckland region. Questions regarding the possible mediation of bilingual identities for teachers and children created a further interrogation of teachers' 'lived experiences' of bilingual activity. The research, informed by critical multiculturalism, used a qualitative methodology and Narrative Inquiry that employed a spiral discourse or 'conversation' approach for data collection. The collaborative insights from participants and researcher became the foundation for further analysis. Findings revealed that bilingual teachers in the absence of government policy, worked powerfully to construct a critical bilingual praxis to counter deficit discourses of bilingualism in Aotearoa/New Zealand. Teachers' 'lived experiences' illustrated their deep knowledge of bilingualism and the use of two languages as critical linguistic and cultural resources for teaching and learning. As trusted agents for the educational and home language communities, 'doing self as bilingual teacher' worked cogeneratively to mediate bilingual identities for themselves and for children.

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  • Many are Called, but only FEW are Chosen - E to'atele e valaaulia ae toaititi e filifilia. The perspectives of Samoan males on their roles as Early Childhood educators.

    Sauni, Seiuli (2006)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research report presents the perspectives and experiences of four Samoan male students in the Pacific Islands Early Childhood Education programme. This study explores and highlights the reasons for their involvement in a profession which is predominantly female. Particular focus on this study was on the significance of their roles within their families, church, communities and most importantly, the development of education of young children. Although these men have all had some teaching experience in Samoa before coming to New Zealand, further studies through the Pacific Islands Early Childhood Teacher Education Programme provided them with new knowledge, skills and an understanding of the Early Childhood Curriculum document. Te Whariki (1996) to enable them to teach in Early Childhood centres. The men in this study were the first male students enrolled in this programme. After three years, they graduated with a Diploma of Teaching and are now all working as qualified teachers in Early Childhood centres in New Zealand.

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  • An Investigation into the Relationships Between Selected Variables and Academic Success in a Pre-Registration Nursing Programme in Scotland

    Cameron, Marie (2006-12)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The ongoing high attrition rates from pre-registration nursing programmes in the United Kingdom (Byrne 2006; RCN Scotland 2006) have long been a cause for concern, and have prompted investigation into possible causes (Glossop 2001). The research done so far has linked, amongst others, factors such as academic success, age, academic qualifications, family commitments and finances to attrition from nursing programmes. Scotland has a particularly high attrition rate (RCN Scotland 2006), and this study aims to investigate the relationships between a variety of variables and academic success. An online, quantitative, questionnaire survey of stage two and three pre-registration nursing and midwifery students was carried out. Demographic data, and data relating to academic performance and extra-curricular work was collected. Kruskall-Wallis testing was used to determine the presence of relationships between variables (Petrie and Sabin 2000). Respondents were split almost 50:50 between the over-25 and under-25 age groups. Almost half of the respondents were married or cohabiting, almost a third have children, and almost a third are the primary wage earners in their households. Academic performance in this group was better in stage one of their course than in stage two. A relationship with academic success was demonstrated with age (p=0.01), entry qualifications (p=0.047), course (p=0.031) and branch (p=0.014) in stage one, but only with age (P=0.041) in stage two. The relationships demonstrated in this study correlate with the published evidence (Glossop 2001), but further analysis and research is required, particularly as the survey had a very low response rate and the sample may not be representative of the population of interest.

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  • Primary teachers' understandings of technological knowledge.

    Patterson, Moira (2009)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Orbitar

    Riegle-Van West, Kate (2011-05-09)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The Orbitar is a new multimedia musical instrument rooted in the ancient art of poi spinning. It is comprised of three components: The Satellites, sound and light generating musical instruments modeled after traditional poi, The Controllers, gloves and a headset which shape the sound and light parameters, and The Console, the receiver for the data coming from The Satellites and The Console, which ultimately creates the final audio output. The Orbitar is a powerful new invention for creating live audio and visual compositions drawing upon 1) the act of play, an important tool for sculpting the brain and reconciling cognitive difficulties, 2) the creation of audio compositions through corporeality and voice, a connection to ritualistic tradition and an important tool for priming the auditory cortex to more effieciently process information, and 3) the use of non-habitual movement and multiple sense, an important tool for relating to the outside world and breaking mechanical tendencies. This paper will 1) outline the history of poi spinning and explain poi’s correlation to flow state, 2) describe the influences behind The Orbitar, 3) layout the theoretical, scientific, artistic, and technological goals as well as the practical applications, 4) outline the debut performance of The Orbitar, OrbitAra, 5) list the project materials and costs, 6) provide a summary, conclusions, and recommendations for future research, and 7) display diagrams and a bibliography.

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  • The Voice of Whānau Māori in their Child’s Success ‘as Māori’ in Mainstream Early Childhood Education

    O'Loughlin, Barbara (2014)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This research examines success ‘as Māori’ in mainstream early childhood education. As a pūrākau qualitative narrative inquiry research, informed by Kauapapa Māori research methodology, this study draws on the voice of four whānau Māori whose child either attends or who has recently attended mainstream early childhood education. The research found that each whānau desires for their child to succeed ‘as Māori’ is personal, for example, one whānau placed emphasis on the importance of their child’s teacher knowing their child’s name and not labelling them as just another Māori child who has limited abilities. At the same time, participants’ also held common aspirations for whānau. This included their desire for mainstream early childhood education to deliver an authentic bicultural practice, where te reo me ona tikanga Māori is naturally enacted and embraced within all areas of the daily programme. A number of participants argued the need for mainstream early childhood education to genuinely commit to collaboration and co-construction with whānau Māori. Most importantly, whānau participants want their children to have a true sense of belonging, identity, security and pride in being Māori. This pūrākau qualitative narrative inquiry has provided a traditional way of narrating Māori stories through a Māori framework. Kaupapa Māori philosophy ensured whānau Māori were culturally safe when sharing their stories.

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  • Generating FDS Fire Simulation Input Using IFC-based Building Information Model

    Dimyadi, Johannes (2007-03-15)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Is smacking in New Zealand a public health problem?

    Hosking, James (2005)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Smacking is often considered a personal, moral issue. However, there are benefits to taking an objective, structured approach to smacking, such as a public health approach. Smacking and other related terms are poorly defined. Definitions of ‘acceptable’ smacking are grounded more in socio-cultural norms than in rational argument. Parents smack for a range of reasons, of which discipline and guidance is only one. The distinction between physical punishment and abuse is problematic. There now exists a large and consistent body of observational evidence linking smacking to a range of negative outcomes. It has been suggested that such results may be due to confounding in cross-sectional studies. However, more recent robust prospective designs yield similar results. It seems likely, though not certain, that smacking causes negative health outcomes. It is also very prevalent, both in New Zealand and in many other countries. No widely agreed definitions exist on what constitutes a public health problem. Smacking satisfies epidemiologically-based criteria for a public health problem, but other criteria are also relevant. Inequalities and human rights approaches are important aspects of public health problems, and smacking is both a health inequality and a breach of human rights. Public health approaches may be useful both in understanding the problem of smacking, and in intervening. The application of a public health intervention framework to smacking, such as the Ottawa Charter, reveals promising opportunities for public health action, though further research is needed to assess the effectiveness of such interventions. Both intervention and further research are clearly justified for this significant public health problem.

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  • 'Integrity Matters: An Inquiry into Social Workers' Understandings': a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work, School of Health and Social Services, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Appleton, Cherie (2011-04)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    This small scale study recruited a sample of qualified and experienced social work practitioners to explore the research question: “How do social workers in Aotearoa New Zealand perceive, understand and interpret the concept of integrity and how do they assess it as being relevant in their work?” The aim of this research was to capture and reflect the participants’ voices in relation to their perceptions, appreciation and application of the notion of integrity to their work. The reasons for choosing to interrogate the topic of integrity were three-fold: i) I was intrigued with the word ‘integrity’ which I perceived to be much used and rarely defined or contextualised in social work conversations, Codes of Ethics and Codes of Conduct. ii) I suspected that the term ‘integrity’ could be a container or integrating concept for a range of values and virtues such as respect, dignity, spirituality, trustworthiness. iii) I wondered if in the process of discovering the practitioner voices in relation to integrity we might also reveal factors or processes that could strengthen critical reflection, enhance job satisfaction, and increase resilient practice. Beginning with an e-survey, participants identified and described some of their definitions and key concepts in relation to integrity. The e-survey provided material that was used in subsequent focus group interviews to further explore participants’ understandings and experiences of integrity. The data collected from the focus group interviews then underwent a thematic analysis and coding process. Findings from this process were distilled and collected under two main headings: Practitioners ‘constructing’ integrity and practitioners ‘maintaining’ integrity. Several themes such as practitioners ‘making meaning’ of integrity, professional and personal integrity, integrity in the workplace, practitioners ‘doing’ integrity and practitioners experiencing challenges to integrity were identified and explored. The discussions and conclusions reached as a result of this study contribute to the advancement of social work knowledge and offer social work practitioners a perceptive framework for enhanced professional reflexivity around constructing and measuring integrity with the possibility of balancing and strengthening integrity in their practice.

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