2,322 results for Unitec Research Bank

  • Aqua house: A house design that explores the possibility of integrating architecture and water, technically and aesthetically

    Dykstra, Les (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project has resulted from current concerns about global water usage and the increasing pollution of water environments. The research focuses on the relationship of water and architecture. The preliminary research re-examines the place that water occupies in architecture in order to determine how current practices in architecture contribute to the pollution of water environments and to what is believed to be an unsustainable usage of water. The project then seeks to investigate how some of these practices in architecture could be modified in the future in order to mitigate the water problem.

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  • Gimme shelter: Tsunami mitigation as part of a permanent shelter programme for Aceh, north Sumatra

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The resulting housing solutions developed for permanent shelter as part of aid packages and reconstruction often belie the complexity of their resolution. This paper briefly outlines the often hidden subtleties in such designs and in particular the complexity that “mitigation” can require. Mitigation is the accepted “notion” that any reconstruction should address former issues by reducing those perceived problems and issues. The hope is that they can be completed eliminated so that the disaster does not happen again. This may not always be achievable. The development of a permanent shelter reconstruction program for the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) for tsunami victims on the west Coast of Aceh, North Sumatra is documented. And in this program the obvious mitigation need was for “tsunami proofing” of housing. Drawing on the tsunami report by Wilkinson, the paper highlights the process, design and planning considered as part of this mitigation and the practicalities of “balancing” the wishes of people to return home to sites ravaged by the tsunami against the responsibility to ensure “safe” housing (Wilkinson, 2005). The starkness of the engineering “numbers” against the social costs is compelling and the paper highlights in practical terms the difficulties sometimes faced to reduce and thus “mitigate”.

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  • Place: A situation of becoming

    Claire O'Shaughnessy (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This is a masters by design project in Landscape Architecture. The research was conducted using a competition brief for an otherwise inconspicuous inner city terrain to develop a design technique that attempts to achieve some of the goals of place theory without falling prey to the essentialism associated with the tradition of this theory. One of the aims of this project is to participate in a general Rehabilitation of place theory in design discourse, in order to deal with some of the problems that arise as a result of a commonly adopted global design approach which does not acknowledge the specific circumstances of a landscape. The problem that immediately presents itself is that place theory and the concept of place are considered by some no longer to be relevant in a time when they have already been widely criticised. As Edward Casey says in The Fate of Place, ‘Space and Place are historical entities subject to the vagaries of time’. The term ‘place’ has been tainted by historical references which are considered singular, exclusive and socially damaging. Therefore the reintroduction of this term in contemporary architectural discussions has been done with caution and thorough redefi nition. Throughout this project I have made myself aware of the criticisms, while familiarising myself with the motivations of traditional place theory. The aim of the project is to meet at least some of the criticisms and make place theory a useful way to approach the design for dynamic, becoming landscapes.

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  • Reframing the Given : How can design techniques drawn from the disciplines of landscape architecture, architecture and the fine arts help to identify and incorporate landscape forces within the analysis phase of landscape architectural design process?

    Griffiths, Christopher (2005)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    The purpose of this research, then, is to identify, unravel, and utilise the often overlooked and unseen forces operating in landscapes. My investigation is intended to allow for the elaboration of rich and intricate patterns of organisation in order to enable the deployment of these by landscape students and professionals. This involves thinking of landscape architecture as an operator and regulator of rhythmic moments occurring in the landscape, rather than as a tool with which to configure bounded terrains containing objects.

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  • Measuring the qualitative aspects of a reconstruction programme: Aceh, Indonesia

    Potangaroa, Regan (2006)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Aid Agencies are accountable for the funds that they administer and consequently there is a reporting requirement to demonstrate that any intervention (such as a permanent housing program) is beneficial to those that the Agency seeks to assist. The WHO Quality of Life Tool (WHO QLT) is one such measure of well being and has been extensively used since it was developed in 1996 (predominantly in the health sector). However, it does requires a before and after study to produce results. This is not necessarily problematic but the paper reports on the application of the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Survey tool that consists of 42 questions (hence its name DASS42) as part of a shelter program for the West Coast of Aceh following the December 2004 tsunami. The advantage of the DASS42 is that it can quantify results based on one survey (Lovibond, 1995). The DASS42 was developed at the University of New South Wales, Australia and while it enjoys wide acceptance this was the first time it was applied to a shelter program. The results from the DASS42 can be used to prioritise beneficiaries and when combined with the Disaster Life Continuum Model (rather than a 4 R Model) provides insights into the psycho-social status of beneficiaries. The paper outlines how the DASS42 was used to quantify the impact of the tsunami disaster in terms of gender, age and resilience of the Acehnese people. The survey was completed by 600 respondents at 5 different locations along the West Coast during the first two weeks of March 2005, less than 3 months after the tsunami.

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  • School prospectuses: Why do New Zealand schools produce one?

    Peppiatt, Asha (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Since the Ministry of Education 1988 introduced market principles and policies as recommended by the Picot Report, New Zealand schools have been encouraged to use marketing strategies to ‘sell’ their school. For many schools marketing is a challenging idea, however, it appears that increasingly schools have to promote themselves to attract more students and thus gain more financial support from the government. As competition between schools increases for the same students in an area, prospectuses could be viewed as promotional materials. Although New Zealand schools are not legally required to produce a prospectus, it may well be a parent’s first impression of a school. This research study questions whether the prospectus makes a significant difference to the attraction and retention of students and promotes the image of the school. This study examined 19 secondary school prospectuses in selected New Zealand North Island areas from a qualitative and quantitative stance. Two methods of data collection were used: a Content Analysis on 19 prospectuses, and two questionnaires both of which were given to the five sample schools who agreed to be part of the study. The first questionnaire was for parents of Year 9 students in the sample schools and the second questionnaire was for the school prospectus production teams. The results indicate that there are very few similarities between prospectuses and a wide range of differences. The language used in the prospectuses was difficult for the majority of the public whilst some prospectuses used very few words; some were very well presented, and some did not contain information sought by parents. The findings suggest that parents want to retain the prospectus as a reference guide to the school but most did not use it to select their child’s school. The results indicated that schools use prospectuses for image projection in the main and as a reference for prospective employees. The prospectus is also used to promote the vision and goals of the current principal rather than that of the school. No members of the Board of Trustees participate in the design of the content of the prospectus.

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  • How can Netlogo be used in the landscape architectural design process?

    Popov, Nikolay (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    “The frame of our view is already framed by a part of its content. We can easily recognize here the topology of the Moebius band where, as in a kind of abyssal inversion, the envelope itself is encased by its interior.” Slavoj Zizek The objective of this masters project is to test the applicability of the Netlogo[1] computer complexity modelling environment to landscape architectural design. This is achieved by designing four Netlogo models of different landscape systems and critically evaluating their usefulness in the design process, outlining possible improvements and shortcomings of the models, and finally making some speculative suggestions for future utilisations of this or other similar techniques in landscape architecture. The recent adoption of complexity theory by landscape architectural writers and the new viewpoints offered by landscape urbanism combined with theoretical and technological innovation in various fields - ranging from object oriented computer programming to geographic information science and urban modeling techniques - provided the theoretical frame work and prompted a possible methodology for this project. Landscape architectural theory has shifted to accommodate the ideas and perspectives originating in complexity theory, changing opinions within the profession.Landscapes are now seen as systems that are open, chaotic, unpredictable, irreversible, and in constant flux – i.e. complex adaptive systems. It has also been accepted that there is little to distinguish between ‘natural’ and ‘artificial’. The interests of landscape architects have shifted from objects to processes and forces, from ‘how things look’ to ‘what they do’. This new paradigm has also provided a useful model for urban designers and planners thus potentially allowing for a more unified perspective within landscape architecture, planning and urban design. Urban Planners now work with the idea that cities are complex, bottom-up phenomena. From this profession, methodologies and techniques have further been developed for modelling or simulating complex adaptive systems and applied them to cities. These techniques made it possible to explore cities ‘bottom up’, to play numerous scenarios for possible futures and to investigate the emergence and development of urban patterns. These methodologies are still missing from the landscape architectural ‘tool bag’. This project introduces, adapts, and evaluates some of the most recent methodologies and algorithms employed in urban simulations for landscape architectural applications. The method explored by this masters project is called multi-agent simulations (MAS). It derives from distributed artificial intelligence studies and it is of a particular interest when modeling space-time dynamics within environmental and urban systems. The underlying concept is that models exhibit behaviours described entirely by their internal mechanisms. Every member, or agent, of the system has a strategy, and when the simulation is running, all agents are implementing their strategies in a parallel manner, while simultaneously registering the changes in the surrounding world. MAS can explore the connection between micro-level behaviour of individuals and the macro-level patterns that emerge from the interaction of many individuals. Netlogo was chosen as the MAS modeling environment according to a set of pragmatic criteria. Learning to work with it was a time consuming and difficult process. This is why the four models developed for this project have an increasing degree of complexity. It is well recognised that models are simplifications of the real thing but they also have many advantages – it is possible to ask multiple ‘what if?’ questions about the system of interest, and this is absolutely central to their use in design and planning, together with their ability to simplify and manipulate worlds associated with human and natural systems and to experiment with them using simulation in ways that were simply unthinkable in earlier times. The evaluation of Netlogo was made by modeling four simulations or case studies that may be of interest to landscape architects and then critically evaluating their advantages and shortcomings. The first case study deals with pedestrian movement simulations at small scale. Two types of pedestrian behaviour are studied - Flocking (curiosity or ‘what one’s neighbour is doing?’) and Turbulence (the desire to flee or to reach some goal). Building 1, Unitec, Carrington Road, Mt. Albert, Auckland and the surrounding areas were selected for this experiment. The second case study deals with hydrology dynamics and GIS – Netlogo data exchange. The Unitec site and the GIS elevation data available were used as a basis for this simulation. Tropical Forest Dynamics is the third case study. It is grounded in the disturbance ecology paradigm i.e. that ecosystems need disturbance events in order to survive. The simulation utilizes a virtual, conical, tropical island as its basis and studies the emergent regenerative forests patterns after cyclone disturbance. Pacific Settlement Regeneration is the fourth simulation. It studies the recovery process of a small Pacific settlement after a cyclonic event. The chosen site was Houma Village, located on the island of Eua, Tonga. This masters project introduces complexity simulations into landscape architectural practice by investigating the advantages and the drawbacks of this type of modelling. It will suggest how the developed models may be further enriched, propose how some of the drawbacks can be overcome, and identify limitations. Finally, there will be some speculations about the future of this technique in landscape architecture.

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  • Leadership learning: a development initiative for experienced New Zealand principals

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2005)

    Journal article
    Unitec

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  • Visual tactility: Architectural photography and tactile design process

    Wong, Linda (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    To investigate the designing potential of the photograph in architecture, through tactile design processes. It can be argued there are two familiar ways architecture is portrayed in a photographic image. The first is the incidental relationship of architecture to the subject of the image. The second is the heightened objectification of the built form. The former often correlates with the depiction of a spatial interior, whereas the latter is more often seen in reference to the exterior of a building. Walter Benjamin states: “Buildings are appropriated in a two fold matter: by use and by perception – or rather by touch and sight…On the tactile side there is no counterpart to contemplation on the optical side. Tactile appropriation is accomplished not so much by attention as by habit. As regards architecture, habit determines to a large extent even optical reception. The latter, too, occurs much less through rapt attention than by noticing the object in an incidental fashion. This mode of appropriation, developed with reference to architecture, in certain circumstances acquires canonical value.”1 Benjamin implied that one cannot contemplate art or architecture only visually. This contemplation, which leads to habit forming tactile experiential knowledge, is what allows us to appreciate and gain a heightened experience of architecture. However, this tactile knowledge is difficult to obtain through viewing a photograph, as it is principally a visual object. The proliferation of architectural photography has led to a particular refining of content, often influenced by the designers themselves and the commercial interests for which the photograph is commissioned. Jonathan Hill states: “The reputation of an architect is, in part, dependent on his or her ability to generate a good photograph. If an architect is successful the same image is published throughout the world, to be copied by other architects…”2 In the course of this project, my objective was to analyse the photographic image; its periphery, perspective and substance, to explore the photograph’s architectural designing potential, beyond the passive representation of space. 1 Benjamin, W. (1969) The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction, Illuminations. (H. Zohn, Trans.). New York: Schocken Books. p.240 2 Hill, J. (2001) Weather Architecture (Berlin 1929-30, Barcelona 1986-, Barcelona 1999-), Architecture – the Subject is Matter (J. Hill Ed.). London: Routledge. p.62

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  • Peripheralisation within a centralised state education system: Small schools and the Auckland Education Board, 1877-1914

    Dean, Robina (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Small schools are an icon of New Zealand’s schooling system, but little attention has been focused on them outside the context of rural education. This historical study addresses the relationship between administrators and small schools in New Zealand to examine the part of small schools in the gradual centralisation of education. It examines how a centre-periphery framework contributes to an understanding of the relationship between the educational State and schools within the context of the relationship between the Auckland Education Board and small schools between 1877 and 1914. It suggests that systemic factors apart from peripheral geographical location contributed to tensions caused by the persistent numerical domination by small schools of the educational landscape. It proposes that small schools were gradually relegated to the periphery as part of the growth of central government within a nationalising discourse of uniformity and efficiency.

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  • The usefulness of corporate ethics programmes in integrating ethics into an organisation's culture

    Nel, Liza (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project examined how useful the components (code of ethics, ethics training, rewarding and disciplining employees) of corporate ethics programmes are in integrating ethics into an organisation’s culture. Ethical standards need to be effectively communicated to employees to integrate ethics into their organisation’s culture. In this regard the communication channels used to inform employees about ethics also play a role and are examined as well. The components and communication channels were analysed and contextualised in terms of a literature review to enable a point of reference and comparison of all the above mentioned aspects after the empirical data was collected. It was decided that quantitative data collection was best suited to this study. An e-survey was executed amongst 483 member organisations of the Rosebank Business Association and the Avondale Business Association in Auckland in the last quarter of 2007. The e-survey was distributed to employees in management positions to capture information regarding corporate ethics programmes and communication channels. A total of 61 useable responses were received, which gave a response rate of 12.63%. After an analysis of the findings the researcher concluded that without the support of senior executives, corporate ethics programmes will be ineffective in integrating ethics into an organisations culture. The findings of the study further revealed that a code of ethics, ethical training, disciplining employees and rewarding employees are useful in integrating ethics into an organisation’s culture. It was also concluded that the direct physical communication channel is the most useful for informing employees about ethics. The main recommendation concerning the Rosebank and Avondale Business Associations is that senior executives should continue to set the example regarding ethical behaviour. Furthermore large and medium size organisations should continue to inform employees about ethics by making use of the Intranet in particular. More research is needed regarding specific components of corporate ethics programmes, as it is unclear whether, amongst others, the penalty or disciplinary approach are most useful in integrating ethics into an organisation’s culture.

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  • Cartographies of friendship: mapping missionary women’s educational networks in Aotearoa/New Zealand 1823-1840

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Describes a textual map of ways in which two Church Missionary Society (CMS) women, Marianne Coldham Williams and Jane Nelson Williams, established networks predominantly with their evangelical ‘sisters’ in England that simultaneously supported, justified and reinforced their work as missionary educators in Aotearoa/New Zealand in the period 1823-1840. This is a postprint of an article published in History of Education © 2003 [copyright Taylor & Francis]; History of Education is available online at: http://www.informaworld.com/ Access to article via URL : http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=0046-760X&volume=32&issue=5&spage=513

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  • Perceptions of travellers regarding wireless local area networks at international airports

    Peng, Fang (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research is concerned with identifying and analysing the issues for travellers around the availability and use of wireless network in public areas of international airports. The subjects of this research study are travellers who use wireless network connections at international airports. The mixed research methodology has been chosen for this research study, which combined quantitative and qualitative research methods together. The quantitative data was collected through paper surveys, and the main qualitative data was gathered through interviews. The total of 60 travellers who were using wireless local area networks (wireless LANs) at three international airports (Beijing, Guangzhou, and Auckland) were selected to do a survey. Twelve participants who were surveyed at Auckland International Airport were chosen to do the interview. Both the quantitative and qualitative data have been presented in full by the researcher, and all of the data were analysed by the researcher to produce the final conclusions of this research. The purpose of this research is to uncover issues such as: why a traveller would use a wireless LAN, what are the types of activities for which a traveller uses wireless LANs and what are their expectations of International airports. The main research question is ‘What are the perceptions of travellers regarding wireless LANs at international airports’. The sub research questions are: What kind of travellers regularly use wireless LANs at international airports? What are the principal expectations and demands of the travelling public regarding wireless LANs at international airports? How has the wireless LAN in airport waiting areas impacted on the travelling public? How does the travelling public think wireless network services at airports can be improved? What wireless network technologies can be used in airports to meet these expectations?

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  • Team building - Adding value or variety?

    Cresswell, Debra (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    A case study approach was adopted in order to discover what, if any, are the organisational benefits of team building. Two prominent New Zealand organisations were studied as they undertook innovative activities designed to reflect workplace issues such as problem solving, goal setting and interpersonal relationships. One organisation used team building activities to reinforce the importance of team work, provide opportunities for the participants to better get to know one another, and enhance communication skills. The second organisation used team building activities to support their high performance team programme, which included enhancing communication skills through the use of feedback, developing interpersonal relationships, along with effective problem solving and goal setting. While the two case study organisations had slightly different objectives, the results show that the activities were particularly effective in developing interpersonal relationships and, to a lesser degree, goal setting and problem solving skills. Responses from both organisations point to the team building activities contributing to an overall sense of belonging to the organisation and participants from both organisations also reported they were more likely to talk positively outside of their workplace about their respective companies. In both case studies, participants felt that the team building activities had had a positive impact on their workplace and that, overall, the inclusion of such activities had been beneficial to their organisations. The participants also reported that the use of creative activities along with an element of competition assisted in engaging the participants and contributed to an overall sense of positiveness. The overall findings support previous research, and suggest that team building can add both value and variety, when used as part of an overall training and development initiative.

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  • Modelling the innovation process: A multi-case comparison

    Evitt, Fern (2007)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This thesis studies the management of the internal innovation process. Innovation is considered critical to success in business today, yet companies do not always unlock the value contained within innovations. The purpose of this study is to develop an understanding of the practical systems currently employed by companies and to gain insight into the activities leading to successful innovation outcomes. The expectation is that a more structured approach to innovation management would deliver greater effectiveness to realising innovation value. A multiple case study strategy was utilised comparing and analysing three companies’ existing innovation-to-outcome systems, with Rogers’ Innovation Decision Process model adopted to ground the study. The findings advance knowledge of innovation system events and related features with results revealing two main innovation systems as consistent across the companies studied. There is a basic system for realising incremental innovation as a consequence of an organisation’s ethos for continuous improvement. The second is a more complex system for radical innovations. This second system supplements the basic version by providing safeguards against the risk inherent nature of this type of innovation. The research indicates that a successful innovation-to-outcome system does not operate in isolation. Rather it appears that there is a link between companies’ operating environments and the effective realisation of innovation value. Further, the results suggest that for such companies successful unlocking of innovation value can lead to growth. This in turn requires formalising innovation systems to sustain innovation activities. This study offers an emerging input/output model drawing on insights and referencing patterns associated with best practice. The model provides a basis for companies to formalise the management of their innovation activities.

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  • Evaluation of network performance of Microsoft operating systems

    Shi, Yi (2009)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This master’s dissertation investigates the evaluation of network performance of various Microsoft Windows operating systems (Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008 and Windows 7 Beta) for both TCP and UDP protocols, as well as DNS, VoIP and gaming bandwidths. The parameters considered for each of these operating systems are throughput, round trip time and jitter. Results indicate that the newer Microsoft Windows client operating system (Windows Vista) does not bring convincing improvements in network performance compared with its predecessor (Windows XP). However, the newer Windows Server operating system (Windows Server 2008) has much higher network performance than its predecessor: Windows Server 2003.

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  • The China-New Zealand Free Trade Agreement: Strategic implications for the New Zealand wine industry's market entry into China

    Ma, Ruming (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Driven by trade liberalisation, globalisation has been regarded as a predominant feature of world economy in the past fifty years. It has increased the interdependencies amongst world market and the diffusion of new ideas, technology, products and lifestyles through international market. No country or company can isolate itself from the integrated world economy and market that is emerging around us. As a result of the adoption of the economic reform and open policy, THE economy of China has grown quickly over the past two decades. China consequently was the largest absorber of foreign direct investment in several past years and was the third biggest country of international trade in year 2005. Potential in the market has been targeted by almost all countries and companies in the world. Capturing shares of Chinese market is regarded by entrepreneurs as a vital for further development, even survive. The ongoing negotiation of the Free Trade Agreement between New Zealand and China will provide New Zealand entrepreneurs with enhanced opportunities to enter this tremendous market, in this case, the New Zealand wine industry. However, whether New Zealand companies will successfully be there depend to large extent on what and how much they know about the market, including business environment and consumers’ behaviours. By relatively intensive research, this paper provides essential knowledge of Chinese wine market and suggestions for the New Zealand wine industry on how to enter the market. This research concludes that the New Zealand wine industry needs to enter Chinese market as early as possible. Suggestions on distributional channel selecting, pricing, packaging and labelling, consumer approaching, as well as initiating promotional activities are discussed and outlined. With regards with characters the New Zealand wine industry, joint ventures and non-production involved wholly owned subsidiaries are suggested as most suitable entry modes for New Zealand wine entrepreneurs to enter Chinese market.

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  • Organisational communication in a strategic change project

    Kingston, Tamsin (2008)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Internal communication has an important part to play in the success of change initiatives. This research project assessed the success of the communication of a strategic change project (Student Max) to employees within an organisation, utilising an educational institution as a case study. The study sought to answer two major research questions: How effective were the communication strategies employed in Phase 1 of the Student Max project? What made these strategies effective or ineffective? It was decided that a largely qualitative approach was the most appropriate method to gather the data required to answer these questions. This study utilised three data collection methods. An online survey was administered to the employees of the organisation, with 136 choosing to participate. Two focus groups were undertaken, one with four participants and one with five. Seven staff from various levels within the organisation were interviewed. The data gathered from these three methods was analysed utilising thematic analysis. Some of the survey questions also produced data that was statistically analysed. A review of the literature suggested that change is a complex process, with many factors contributing to the success or failure of change initiatives. It also suggested that communication was an important, if not the most important, part of the change process, often meaning the difference between success and failure. The findings of this thesis support this primacy of communication. Analysis revealed that the communication strategies employed in the Student Max project were a qualified success. The needs of all employees were not met, and a variety of problems with the communication were identified. However none of these problems resulted in the communication being ineffective for the organisation as a whole. Some key issues were raised, such as a lack of trust within the organisation, perceived gaps between management and employees, and a lack of involvement of employees within the change process. A number of barriers to communication effectiveness were also identified, including high workload, timing of communication, lack of co-ordination of communication, change fatigue, and employee cynicism. In addressing these issues and barriers the organisation has the opportunity to enhance communication effectiveness.

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  • Interrogating Orthodox Voices: Gender, Ethnicity and Educational Leadership

    Fitzgerald, Tanya (2003)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Research in educational leadership and management, while comprehensive in its scope and direction, has considerable imbalance. This article argues that atlthough there has been changes that look at women's leadership, little has been done to address practice or to account for ethnicity and diversity, and there is an implicit assumption that functions and features can be transported across homogenous educational systems. This is an electronic version of an article published in School Leadership and Management which is a available online at Informaworld (http://www.informaworld.com/) with the open URL directly to the published article: http://www.informaworld.com/openurl?genre=article&issn=1363-2434&issue=4&spage=431&volume=23

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  • Defining public relations in New Zealand through its history and practice

    Sele, Morten (2006)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This project sets out to examine how public relations is conceptualised in theory and in practice in New Zealand. Further it aims to advise the profession’s future direction. An examination of the PR literature identified three struggles within the professional field of Public relations; (1) a gap between theory and practice, (2) PR is struggling with a bad reputation, and (3) there exists a huge diversity within the practice of PR, which makes it hard to offer a concrete definition of what PR is. The review showed that there are clear historical reasons for these struggles, and that they are slowing down the ongoing professionalisation of an ever increasing important practice to organisational communication. A survey was conducted amongst Public Relations Institute of New Zealand’s 735 working members (Student members were excluded as most of the questions in the questionnaire would be irrelevant to them), and with a response rate of 21%, the questionnaire more or less backed up the struggles. In-depth interviews were conducted on four senior practitioners in New Zealand, where the results from the questionnaires were discussed, and advices for the future of the profession were given. The project concludes with several areas of research that must be conducted by the Public Relations Institute of New Zealand (PRINZ). PRINZ should in particular pay attention to Great Britain, where the industry has become chartered. The process that the Chartered Institute of Public Relations’ (CIPR) has been through and their experiences from this shift should be studied by PRINZ in detail. The dissertation also recommends PRINZ to continue its communications with the tertiary institutions in New Zealand, as well as the media. It is also important that Statistics NZ understands what public relations is all about. The dissertation concludes that the struggles listed above, need to be taken seriously by PRINZ, as they are decelerating the ongoing professionalisation of public relations in New Zealand. It is important to emphasise that the purpose of this report was not to generate a quantitative overview of the PR industry in New Zealand, rather the report intended to capture a ‘snapshot’ of the practice today.

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