33 results for Honours Dissertation

  • "Square girls" : Prostitutes and prostitution in Dunedin in the 1880s

    Lucas, E Heather (1985)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The study of prostitutes and prostitution in New Zealand has usually been subordinate to a more general analysis of women and crime. As prostitutes were, and still are, regarded as criminals in New Zealand, this has been a valid approach. However, prostitution was a particular sort of crime, in that it was essentially a crime against middle class morality. As a consequence, a study of prostitution, in itself, not only allows a fuller appreciation of the nature and extent ,of prostitution in New Zealand, but also an insight into the social structure and attitudes pertaining to sexuality and morality in colonial New Zealand. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Geophysical survey of the Paringa River valley, South Westland

    Kilner, Jeremy William (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: [iv], 104 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.) and 1 map (folded). Notes: CD-ROM and map in pockets inside back cover. University of Otago department: Geology. Thesis (B. Sc. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2005. Includes bibliographic references.

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  • A study of a silver beech stand in the Silver Peaks State Forest

    Armstrong, Patricia (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    20 leaves : ill., map ; 32 cm. Unpublished material. Research paper (B. Sc. (Hons.)) -- University of Otago, 1979.

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  • Disrupting the binary: a space for gender diversity

    Harris, Kathryn (2015)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    It is by now almost self-­‐evident that binary models of the highly nuanced concept of gender are at best incomplete, and limit understanding of the diversity of gender expression. In this work, I summarise and critique standard models of gender. I discuss three broad approaches to gender: biological, social and biosocial. A central problem inherent in these approaches is that they almost always revert to a form of binary discourse — even as they critique such an approach — because the fundamental understanding of gender is rooted in discrete classifications. Drawing on theoretical discourse from prominent theorists, I explore an alternative approach to gender classifications and experiences. I suggest that new approaches and alternate models are needed to express ideas and data of gender more inclusively and with greater accuracy. This work includes my research and discussion of a gender spectrum as represented by a colour-­‐wheel. I introduce the Colour-­‐ Wheel of Gender Diversity and its practical applications. Exploration of diversity and its implications in both the personal realm and the social are essential in the quest to move towards ideals of fairness and equality. I believe that it is important to problem-­‐solve issues of non-­‐representation that cause oppression in our society and to enable legitimate understandings of a continuum of gendered realities.

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  • Land management change and conflict resolution in Abel Tasman National Park, 1855-1995

    Moran, Amanda K. (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Societal change begins when the perceptions of an individual or a group are altered. A change in perception can lead to conflict if not all members of a society hold the new belief at the same time. This study looks at how the resulting conflict can be resolved, particularly in relation to changes in land management. Conflict in land management is rooted in interactions between people, and between people and their environment. In New Zealand an important cause of conflict is related to the development of National Parks. There are two main issues within this: (1) The development of National Parks involves a change in land use from private to public. (2) For some, the sole purpose of a National Park is environmental protection while others see recreation as important. These differing views lead to the need for continuing debate as the patterns of landuse change. Through this debate we can resolve the more immediate areas of concern in terms of land management while remaining aware that there will be new issues in the future that require further consideration. The aim of this study is to look at these areas of concern and related issues in relation to changing land management practices and conflict resolution in Abel Tasman National Park (ATNP) over a 140 year period: from 1855 to 1995. Prior to the formation of ATNP people would talk about "going down the Bay" as the area did not have an official name (Moncreiff 1965). For convenience the name ATNP will be used to describe the area over the entire period of this study, although the Park proper was not gazetted until 1942.

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  • Archaeology and Shell Adzes in Prehistoric Oceania: A Revised Methodological Approach to the Descriptive Analysis of a Solomon Islands Collection

    Radclyffe, Charles (2015-12-09)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation examines archaeological study of shell adzes in the Pacific. It provides a critical review of archaeological methodology and terminology used in descriptive analysis of this artefact class. It raises important problems that are hindering this subject including a lack of clarity and conformity in the selection of criteria used to describe shell adzes, ambiguity in nomenclature, and the restricted capacity of existing criteria to accommodate a wide range of morphological variation of these artefacts. In addition, it argues that archaeologists have focused almost exclusively on describing typological variation for culture historical purposes. This is problematic as it has resulted in the neglect of a wider range of issues important in shell adze study, specifically technology, function and ecology. A revised methodology is proposed to address these problems and is applied in the descriptive analysis of two collections of shell adzes from Solomon Islands: one stored at the Otago Museum in Dunedin, New Zealand and the other at Solomon Islands National Museum in Honiara, Solomon Islands. The morphological and metric characteristics of the different shell adze varieties is described, as well as evidence of manufacturing processes involved in their creation. The findings of this analysis are then discussed in relation to their implications for broadening shell adze analysis by incorporating technological, functional and ecological issues. Problems encountered in the analysis are highlighted, and recommendations are made to further develop methodology in shell adze analysis.

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  • The declaration of inconsistency with the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990

    Curran , Chris (2001)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Section 2(4) of the Criminal Justice Amendment Act (No 2) 1999 is incompatible with the cardinal tenets of a liberal democracy. This Court would be compromising its judicial function if it did not alert Parliament in the strongest possible manner to the constitutional privation of this provision. The arrival of the declaration of inconsistency in Moonen v Film and Literature Board of Review was quite remarkable. There was nothing in the legislative history nor the terms of the New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 (NZBORA) that explicitly furnished the courts with the jurisdiction to declare that certain statutory limitations of rights are inconsistent with the Act. Concerns were immediately raised about the feasibility and constitutional propriety of the new remedy. The Court of Appeal's traditionally liberal approach to the NZBORA appeared to have led it into error. It will be argued in this paper, however, that the declaration is both a legitimate and practical development. The new remedy promises to augment the democratic processes protecting human rights, facilitate transnational and domestic institutional dialogues on the nature of such rights, and promote a climate of rights-based justification and accountability for state action. Chapter 1 inquires into the significance of the declaration. The nature of the declaration is outlined, and its current legal status considered. The impact of the declaration is then briefly traversed in terms of its implications for the law of remedies, the NZBORA, the constitution, and New Zealand jurisprudence. Chapter 2 then questions whether the declaration is truly a surprising development. In this regard, the legal pedigree of the declaration, the context of expanding NZBORA remedies and the UK statutory analogue are all discussed. Chapter 3 begins the analysis of the legitimacy of the declaration. The inquiry first assesses the fit between the declaration and the broader NZBORA framework. The constitutional relationship between Parliament and the courts then provides a major yardstick in this legitimacy analysis. Democratic objections to the declaration and the possible benefits of a new constitutional order are discussed. Finally, the ramifications of the declaration for the international human rights system are assessed. Chapter 4 concludes the paper by considering the methodology of declaration decision-making. It looks to Canada for guidance in appraising the legitimacy and competency of such decisions, and discerns lessons regarding the employment of appropriate legal and procedural methods in this regard. The final procedural issue discussed is the question of standing. The two dominant standing standards are thus evaluated against the requirements of declaration decisionmaking and the nature of the declaration itself.

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  • Otago 17 - Southland 11 : a social history of Otago rugby in the 1940s

    Lynch, Anthony (1984)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Sport plays a special role in New Zealand society, and one sport, rugby, dominates all others in terms or time, interest and participation. The 'national game' has helped to shape New Zealanders' perceptions or themselves, and the feats or the All Blacks have assisted the formulation of national identity. New Zealanders take pride in their prowess in this physically demanding game, and every Saturday in winter thousands turn out to participate in the game, as players or spectators. This interest is reflected in the great number or accounts or teams, games and trophies, and yet surprisingly little has been written about the role rugby has played in society. This long essay looks at what rugby meant for the people or Otago in the 1940s. In the history or rugby in the province, the 1940s were probably the most interesting and certainly the most important decade. It could be divided into two distinct periods; the war years and the Shield era. Between 1939 and 1945, New Zealand was involved in a major war, and this had an impact on sport as it did every other facet or New Zealand life. The first chapter will look at the impact or the war on the rugby in the province, and at the response or the ORFU, the clubs and the players to the difficulties or wartime rugby. The other important, and distinct, period in the 1940s was the 'Shield Era', when for three glorious years the province held the symbol or national rugby supremacy, the Ranfurly Shield. Otago was at its most formidable in 1948, its centennial year, and the final chapter looks at this period and its significance for the province. During the war years, rugby at the club level was most important, for there were few representative games played. But in the Shield era, Carisbrook hosted a feast of representative football, and all attention focused on the Otago team and its achievements. These two periods were very different because of this, and yet there was much that remained the same. These elements have been incorporated in the middle chapters. The first two look at those who were most actively involved in the game, the players, and the coaches and administrators. The latter two chapters regard the rituals that surrounded the game and were followed by the players and spectators. In writing a social history of rugby in the 1940s one great advantage has been the ability to use oral sources. Oral evidence adds life and vigour to the history of a lively and vigorous game, and where possible I have tried to reproduce this evidence, rather than that of newspapers or minutes, in the text. In conducting the interview I followed the procedure set out in Paul Thompson's The Voice of the Past, and then each interview was transcribed in full. Where possible, evidence was checked against documented sources (mostly newspapers). The 'Saturday' chapter in particular has drawn largely on oral sources, and so perhaps this best of all gives an insight into what the game meant for these men, and the many thousands like them. In all, I have tried not to lose sight of the game itself. As D. Smith and G. Williams in their fine work Fields of Praise noted, the game has too often emerged only as an illustration of something else that was going on in the real world; the intrinsic value of the game's history and the interlocking aspects with 'the real world' have not been appreciated.

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  • F**k off : an examination of the relationship between art and politics in the practice of Ai Weiwei

    Holt, Briar (2012)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 69 leaves : illustration, some colour, portraits ; 30 cm. Notes: University of Otago department: Art History and Theory. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 2012. Includes bibliographical references.

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  • New Zealand’s legal profession – at a cross-roads?

    Leslie, Nicola K (2005)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    What do you call 100 lawyers at the bottom of the ocean? 'A good start!' New Zealand's legal profession is an easy scapegoat for public criticism. Yet barristers and solicitors are a tightly regulated profession. This paper aims to understand and analyse the current climate within the legal services market in New Zealand. Why is our legal profession under such attack? It seems ironic that a profession which aspires to high ideals could be the subject of such criticism. Yet we rarely consider why such high standards are demanded of a profession. Chapter One will discuss the concept of a profession, and show whether the legal profession in New Zealand can retain such a position. If there is to be any answer to disparaging remarks about lawyers, we must identify and resolve the criticisms of lawyers in New Zealand. Chapter Two will discuss the criticisms directed at barristers and solicitors, to understand why public confidence in our legal profession may be threatened. Ironically the legal profession is subject to a number of different controls. Parliament, the Courts, the profession's own representative bodies at both a national and local level and individual clients all impact on lawyers' practise. Chapter Three will discuss how each institution has responded to the criticisms made of lawyers. Chapter Four will assess any resulting concerns of the profession which remain problematic. This paper will review the legal profession in New Zealand. For all those who practise as barristers and solicitors this is your collective reputation at risk. It is a review with which all lawyers should be particularly concerned. [Introduction]

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  • Ripples from Europe: the Dunedin Jewish community in the 1930s and 1940s

    Baumberg, Christine (1998-11)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    A dissertation submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of BA (Hons) in History and German at the University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. vi, 85 leaves, [6] leaves of plates (1 folded) : ill., map, ports. ; 30 cm.

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  • Silent Sentinels : The War Trophies of the First New Zealand Expeditionary Force in War and Peace

    Fox, Aaron Patrick (1987)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    The author has made available an updated and illustrated version of this dissertation at: http://www.kiamatetoa.com/drathesis.php

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  • Big Norm - a principled pragmatist? : the origins and implementation of Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, 1959-1974

    Waite, James David Anthony (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Preface: This essay aims to explore Norman Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies. It focuses on policy formulation and diplomatic process within the context of the 'moral and independent' foreign policy. The author does not aim to describe in detail the 1973 ICOJ case, that sought to end French atmospheric nuclear testing. Others have dealt with this event in detail and with great expertise. Instead the essay re-examines all of Kirk's anti-nuclear weapons policies, beginning in 1959 and ending with Kirk's death in August 1974. Kirk's policies continued in various forms after his death. Yet the strong and focused leadership that he provided in the field of disarmament and for humanitarian issues in general ended on 31 August 1974. The death of Kirk was a watershed for the New Zealand Labour Party. The man who dominated its leadership through two electoral defeats and one victory vanished from the political scene. Kirk's life as a mature politician constitutes an era in the history of New Zealand's anti-nuclear movement. His leadership deserves to be evaluated on its own terms.

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  • Good faith bargaining in New Zealand: A study of its development and likely practical application

    Horne, Stuart (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: 89pp. Notes: University of Otago department: Law.

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  • Packing down the scrum: an historical analysis of the 1981 Springbok tour and the homosexuality issue in the Presbyterian Church of Aotearoa New Zealand

    Brown, Michael Neal Rowatt (1995)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Physical description: iii, 68 leaves ; 30 cm. Covers the years 1981 through to 1995. Thesis (B.A. (Hons.))--University of Otago, 1995. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 66-68).

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  • Geology of the Gladstone peak area, Takitimu mountains, western Southland, New Zealand

    Scott, Graeme L. (1974)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Volcanogenic sediments of the Lower Permian Takitimu Group into the Gladstone Peak area are mapped and sub-divided into seven lithofacies. Some of the lithofacies indicate a shallow marine near shore environment, others indicate subaqueous and possibly subaerial pyroclastic flows. These volcanic sediments are cut by dykes, sills and plugs of predominantly basaltic composition and by a small diorite intrusion. The origin of the diorite intrusion is attributed to fractional crystallisation and flow differentiation. Six rocks have been chemically analysed and their geochemistry is examined. Some of the component oxides (SiO2, Fe2O3, CaO, Na2O) in the volcanic rocks have been remobilized, redistributed and deposited elsewhere as authigenic minerals. The Takitimu Group rocks and intrusives have been metamorphosed to Zeolite facies and probably Prehnite-Pumpellyite facies in a low pressure type II terrain. There is a contact metamorphic aureole around the diorite intrusion. Some of the zeolites present would appear to require alkaline, mildly saline ground waters, relatively low activity of H2O, low chemical potential of CO2 and a relatively high temperature (ca. 250°C) for their formation. The metamorphism is similar to that which prevails in the Tanzawa Mountains, Japan where the geothermal gradient is inferred to have been between 40-60°C/km. The area is part of the Princhester Fault Block (new name) which is itself block faulted. It is likely that the dykes have intruded these Permian block faults. The strata in the Gladstone Peak area were later tilted. They characteristically dip gently toward the South-East and are interrupted by minor faults and cross-cutting veins.

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  • A functional analysis of coral tools from late prehistoric Moloka'i Island, Hawaii.

    Dickson, Hamish (1999)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    1.1 Research Orientation During the course of archaeological fieldwork conducted late in 1978, 425 artifacts relating to fishhook manufacture were recovered from site 38 on Moloka'i Island in the Hawaiian chain. Fishhook manufacturing artifacts include Porities sp coral and echinoid urchin spine abraders, basalt flakes, bone fishhook blanks and bone fishhook debitage. Artifacts deemed coral abraders (precise definition will be given in a latter section) were studied from this site and will be the focus of this dissertation. It is generally believed that coral abraders were used to manufacture fishhooks for the following reasons: 1) Coral artifacts have been found in close association with fishhook manufacture (Emory, Bonk and Sinoto and Sinoto, 1959, Allen, 1992; Suggs 1961; Kirch and Yen 1982 and Buck 1957: and many others). 2) Early ethnographic accounts recorded in the journals of Captain James Cook by Joseph banks (Endeavor botanist), describe native Pacific islanders manufacturing fishhooks using coral files (Hawkesworth, 1773). 3) Use-wear analysis by Allen (1992) indicates that a large number of these tools may have been used to manufacture fishhooks. This dissertation as two main aims: 1) To form a classification system (non-classificatory arrangement; after Dunnel, 1971) for the purpose of ascertaining a functional to coral tools in relation to fishhook manufacture. 2) To devise a standardised system for the measurement of attributes on coral abraders that may aid future functional studies . Chapter one will set the scene, giving details regarding the background of the site under investigation. A definition and basic description of coral tools will be provided along with a review of the literature regarding coral artifacts. Chapter two is divided into two parts. The first part involves a brief review of the literature on classification systems and typology’s. Also in the first section, a justification will be given as to why the particular classification system was used. The second half of chapter two will involve a justification of attributes chosen to form the classification system. The third chapter involves a description of the methods used in measuring attributes and why these attributes were measured in this manor. This will be followed with a detailed description of each artifact class. Each class description will be accompanied with possible functions. The last chapter will be brief, involving conclusions and suggestions for future research. [extract from Introduction]

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  • Deep Heat: An Experimental Analysis of Ovenstones

    Gillies, Karl B (1979)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Acknowledgements INTRODUCTION PART 1: METHODS AND MATERIALS. 1.1: Choice of Site, Construction and Ignition of Ovens; 1.2: Selection of Ovenstones; 1.3: Oven Monitoring; 1.4: Stone Assessment. PART 2: RESULTS. 2.1: Oven Temperature Graphs; 2.2: Heat Retention Differences Per Size and Type; 2.3: Shattered Stone Percentage Graphs; 2.4: Lithology of Fired Stones; 2.5: Typical Fracture Patterns. PART 3: DISCUSSION. 3.1: Experimental Sources of Error; 3.2: The Ovens and Their Food; 3.3: The Ovenstones. PART 4: CONCLUSIONS. PART 5: APPENDIX. Thermal Conductivity Graphs from Sutton’s BA Hons. Dissertation 1971. PART 6: SOURCES CONSULTED.

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  • The Chemistry and Photochemistry of the Insecticide Carbaryl in Aquatic Environments

    Brown, Jeff (1991)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Large quantities of pesticides have been used for many years in New Zealand to control agricultural and horticultural pests. The fate of a pesticide after application as a powder or solution to the target organism depends on its chemical structure and mode of application. Once in the environment, it may degrade by any number of physical, chemical or biological mechanisms. The time scale for this degradation can span from hours to years and the degradation products may be as toxic, if not more, than the parent molecule. Thus pesticides may become ‘xenbiotic’ pollutants and eventually have adverse effects not only in the environment but they may also bioaccumulate in the food chain and even ultimately affect humans. One of the common degradation pathways of many chemical species ion the environment is via sunlight-induced photochemistry either in the solid state or in solution. The aim of this project was to examine this degradation pathway for solutions of a pesticide in common usage in New Zealand. It was hoped that the results from this study would provide some indication of the relative importance of sunlight as a method of pesticide degradation. In the New Zealand environment, a significant fraction of all pesticides are ultimately washed off the target plants and organisms to form solutions in natural aquatic environments, such as streams, rivers, lakes and coastal estuaries. […] In this study, detection methods were first developed for carbaryl , 1-naphthol and 1-naphtholate based on the fluorescence of these species. The hydrolysis of carbaryl and the degradation of 1-naphthol plus 1-naphtholate were then investigated under typical water pH conditions (8.2) in the absence of light and microorganisms. Photolysis equipment was developed to study the photochemical degradation of carbaryl and 1-naphthol in aqueous solution under various conditions and a comparison made with the results for degradation in the absense of light. [Extract from Introduction]

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  • Geology of the southern portion of the Greenhills ultramafic complex

    O’Loughlin, Benjamin (1998)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Exposed along a three kilometre stretch of coastline on the southern extremities of the South Island, New Zealand are a suite of calc-alkaline to tholeiitic ultramafic and gabbroic rocks which form the southern portion of the Greenhills Ultramafic Complex (GUC). This complex consists of a layered series of dunite, wehrlite, olivine-clinopyroxenite and gabbro of Earliest Triassic age (247Ma), which intrude Lower Permian meta-sedimentary lithologies of the Greenhills Group. Accompanying the intrusion of the complex is a narrow contact metamorphic aureole which decreases rapidly in grade from pyroxene-hornfels facies metamorphism, directly adjacent to the body, to regional prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism, with distance from the contact. The layered series of the GUC is stratigraphically divisible into an upper gabbroic portion of both non-cumulate and cumulate gabbroic rocks, and a lower ultramafic portion of dunite, wehrlite and olivine-clinopyroxenite. The lower ultramafic portion shows well-developed accumulate structures and textures that are typical of stratiform cumulate intrusions. Widespread slumping in the layered series in addition to discrete zones of intense brecciation, faulting, and multiple phases of dyke injection indicate recurring conditions of instability during the evolution of the complex. Textural, mineralogical, and chemical evidence suggests that two gabbro suites comprise the upper gabbroic portion. Namely, a cumulate suite (Shipwreck Gabbro) that is closely related to the lower ultramafic portion, and a non-cumulate (Barracouta Point Gabbro) suite, which is thought to have crystallised from a mixed magma. Whole rock chemistry of the layered series indicates a clear magmatic fractionation trend through dunite to gabbro, consistent with chemical fractionation from a basaltic parental magma. This trend is characterised by a systematic decrease in magnesium content with a concordant increase in silica, aluminium, calcium, and alkalis. A similar fractionation trend is exhibited by the evolution of the primary mineral phases olivine, clinopyroxene and plagioclase through the layered series. The theory that the GUC may have been derived by dry partial melting of the mantle wedge is supported by the similarity in trace element chemistry between the GUC and N-type Mid Ocean Ridge Basalt (MORB). Similarly, the trace element chemistry correlates well with recent basalts and basaltic andesites from the Tonga-Kermadec Island Arc, indicating that present day active ocean-ocean island arc subduction zones may serve as closely representative models for the evolution of remnant arcs such as that inferred for the GUC. The development of a strong tholeiitic to calc-alkaline island arc chemistry in the GUC is typical for magmatic bodies throughout the Brook Street Terrane, which are thought to represent the remnant of an ancient island arc system. A comparison of chemistry between the GUC and that of the Blashke Islands Alaskan-type intrusion from SE Alaska, indicates that these two bodies have been de1ived by fractional crystallisation of a closely similar parental magma, and thus, the GUC can be classified as a Alaskan-type Intrusion. The Greenhills Ultramafic Complex was produced as the result of crystal settling during fractional crystallisation of a basaltic parental magma produced by dry melting of the mantle wedge in an ocean-ocean island arc subduction zone. Modification of the layered body by magmatic slumping, mingling and brecciation and faulting depict recurring conditions of instability within the pluton which is considered typical of island arc subduction zones.

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