17,196 results for Masters

  • Third culture young women: Understanding their life experiences and leadership perspectives : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master of Business Studies (Management) at Massey University, New Zealand

    Chatiya Nantham, Rhema Roja (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Globalisation influences how leadership is understood and practiced and impacts on culturally diverse interactions in New Zealand communities. Examining leadership and intersecting diversity with regards to culture, gender and age could provide a richer understanding of how identity impacts on leadership. Youth are increasingly growing up in multicultural communities, giving rise to a phenomenon widely referred to as Third Culture Kids (TCKs) – adolescents who grow up in cultures outside of their home culture. To date there is no research on the leadership perspectives and development needs of TCKs, and although there are programmes and studies focusing on leadership development for young women, very few of these initiatives focus on culturally diverse young women. This research focused on examining the diverse lifeworlds of third culture young women to appreciate how their intersecting experiences and perspectives influenced their leadership understanding. Using an interpretive phenomenological approach, four third culture young women, selected from a leadership programme for Year 13 (16 year old) young women, were interviewed and asked questions that explored their experiences and perspectives regarding being third culture individuals, young women, and leaders. The responses were analysed using a modified version of Ashworth’s (2003) phenomenological framework to reveal that diverse young women have an awareness of the gendered expectations that society constructs, have an ability to navigate cultural differences, and are able to strategize how to interact with various social groups as a result of their diverse life experiences and intersecting identities. Ultimately, their core values, life experiences, and diverse perspectives as culturally distinct adolescent women shape their leadership understanding and practice. This study concludes that third culture young women are embodying values, perspectives, skills and strategies that suggest their potential as emerging leaders in their communities and future aspirations aligned with their leadership purpose of achieving personal success and helping others. In conclusion there is a need for greater application from academics and practitioners of intersectionality into leadership studies and practice. Recommendations were made with regards to leadership research and development programmes in the future and how these can explore the leadership potential of young, culturally diverse women like young TCK women.

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  • A provisional assessment of risk associated with heavy metal accumulation in New Zealand agricultural soil: Effects of landfarming and fertiliser use on the heavy metal concentrations in plants : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Environmental Management (without major) at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Okafor, Chioma MaryAnn (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study investigated heavy metal accumulation in New Zealand agricultural soil (horticultural soil and landfarm-impacted soil), factors influencing their concentration in leafy vegetables and pasture, and the potential implications to food safety, animal welfare and human welfare. The study also sought to verify the hypothesis that “landfarming poses no threat to pasture and animal welfare” with respect to heavy metal accumulation. In addition, hemp phytoremediation potential was also explored for landfarm-impacted soil. This study is a synthesis of two glasshouse trials that have, as a common denominator, heavy metal accumulation in New Zealand agricultural soil. The first project assessed cadmium accumulation in leafy vegetables (spinach, silverbeet and lettuce) grown on two New Zealand commercial horticultural soils while the second project focused on heavy metal accumulation in pasture (ryegrass) and a cash crop (hemp) grown on agricultural soil that had been amended with drilling waste. Bulk composite soil samples used for this glasshouse trial were collected from commercial horticultural farms in two locations (Pukekohe and Gisborne), while a landfarm-impacted soil and drilling waste from oil exploration and production sites was collected from the Taranaki region. Soil samples were crushed and potted into replicate pots containing (4kg). Lettuce, spinach and silverbeet were seeded in horticultural soils while ryegrass and hemp were seeded in impacted soils. All soil and plant samples were harvested and taken to the Soil and Earth Science laboratory, Massey University Palmerston North for analysis of heavy metal concentration (Cd, Zn, Cu and Ni) and dehydrogenase activity. Descriptive statistics and ANOVA of means was conducted using Minitab 17. The total Cd concentration in the Pukekohe soil was 0.26 mg Cd/kg soil and that in the Gisborne soil 0.11 mg Cd/kg. The Cd, Cu, Ni and Zn concentration in the landfarmimpacted soil was 0.1 mg Cd/kg; 12.57 mg Cu/kg; below detection limit (BDL) for Ni and 29.99 mg Zn/kg respectively. These values were not significantly different to concentrations in an adjacent control soil collected at the same time for the pot experiment (0.1 mg Cd/kg, 11.5 mg Cu/kg, 29.14 mg Zn/kg, and Ni (BDL)). The Cd concentration in all leafy vegetables grown on the horticultural soil and sampled at two time points (spinach, silverbeet and lettuce) exceeded tolerable limits for Cd in agronomic crops (0.05 - 0.5 mg Cd/kg) with the exception of lettuce (in Pukekohe and Gisborne soil at final stage) and silverbeet (in Pukekohe soil at final stage). Spinach showed elevated Cd accumulation (0.27 mg/kg FW) above CODEX (2010) and FSANZ (2011) limits for the Gisborne soil. The heavy metal concentration (Cd, Zn, Ni and Cu) in hemp and ryegrass grown on the landfarm-impacted soil and control were not significantly different but within tolerable limits in agronomic crops (Cu: 5 – 20 mg/kg; Zn: 50 – 100 mg/kg; Ni: 1- 10 mg/kg). Soil pH is the dominant factor influencing metal bioavailability while organic matter content, and oxalate extractable Al and Fe oxide content (sesquioxides) also affects cadmium bioavailability in agricultural soils. There was no evidence of a heavy metal (Zn, Ni, Cu and Cd) concentration above soil limits defined for the safe application of biosolids in horticultural and landfarmimpacted soils. This suggests that animal wellbeing (via soil ingestion) and food safety will not be affected as a result of land application of drilling waste and long history of P fertiliser use. However, cadmium and heavy metal management is necessary to prevent elevated accumulation over time. Elevated Cd concentration in spinach does not pose direct threat to human consumers but has the potential to limit the accessibility of this product in export markets. A soil heavy metal concentration below biosolids guidelines in the landfarm-impacted soil implies that remediation of this land is not necessary. This observation was supported by data on soil microbial activity in the landfarm-impacted soil which showed no difference from the control soil. The data does not support the public perception and industry concerns that heavy metal accumulation in landfarm-impacted soil poses a health risk. In case of a continued halt in milk collection from landfarmimpacted sites by the dairy industries, a cash crop (hemp) with no exposure pathway and high biomass quality (under landfarm-impacted soil) that potentially has high economic value could replace the traditionally ryegrass system, changing the agricultural land use from a food one to a non-food one.

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  • Characterisation of PP2Cβ in regulating tumour suppressor pathways in cancer cell lines : A thesis presented to Massey University in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Masters in Genetics

    Miller, Rachel Elizabeth (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Tumour suppressor p53 is a key regulator in preventing neoplastic transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest or death in response to stress-signalling pathways. Consequently, p53 is often non-functional during the early stages of cancer development through either direct mutation or aberrant expression of negative regulators. PP2Cβ is a protein phosphatase which was recently identified as a negative regulator of p53 and cellular senescence. However, the function of PP2Cβ in cancer development is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to characterise PP2Cβ and its regulation of p53 pathways in human cancer cell lines. This aim was split into two objectives. The first objective was to examine the effects of PP2Cβ on p53 pathways and cell proliferation in four cancer cell lines with various genetic backgrounds. A protein analysis using western immunoblotting procedures indicates that p53 pathways are activated in cell lines expressing wildtype p53 and Ras. Consistent with activated p53 pathways, PP2Cβ knockdown significantly reduced proliferation rates, which could be attributed to an increased expression of a p53 target gene, p21 cell cycle inhibitor. The second objective was to investigate the mechanisms regulating of PP2Cβ gene expression. Previously, p63 was identified as a potential negative regulator of PP2Cβ gene expression based on a modular relational database that integrated microarray results with a genome-wide search of p53 family member response elements. It was therefore hypothesized that p63 could negatively regulate PP2C gene expression. Mammalian expression vectors carrying either the p63 or p73 expression cassette were constructed and PP2Cβ expression was analysed upon overexpression of p53 family members (p53, p63 and p73) in two human cancer cell lines. A reverse-transcriptase coupled quantitative PCR showed that overexpression of p63 resulted in decreased PP2Cβ expression in p53 wildtype cell line. Taken together the results presented here suggest that restoration of tumour suppressors such as p53 and Rb activity by PP2C inhibition could be used as a potential therapeutic strategy in cancer treatment.

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  • Characterization of a Partially Purified Carom (Trachyspermum ammi) Extract and Its Influence on Starch Functionality and Digestibility A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Food Technology (MFoodTech) at Massey University (Manawatu Campus), New Zealand EMBARGOED UNTIL 1 March 2018

    Kumar, Ramesh (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The interactions between starches and the components in spices and herbs have been poorly studied so far. This study investigated the preliminary effects of thirty-six different spices and herbs on pasting properties of rice starch. It largely concentrated on the characterization of a partially purified carom extract (from the dried fruit of the Trachyspermum ammi plant) and its influence on the structural, thermal, pasting properties and digestibility of native rice starch. Rheology, differential scanning calorimetry, size exclusion chromatography coupled with a multi-angle laser light scattering, zeta potential, hot-stage optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and in-vitro starch digestion analysis were carried out to characterise the carom extract and starch-carom system. The results showed that carom, cumin, fennel, mulberry leaf, perilla leaf, neem and coriander seed extracts showed peak and final viscosity-suppressing effect, while mesona, rosemary, green tea, thyme, and clove extracts showed peak viscosity-enhancing effect on rice starch during starch pasting. The water-soluble fraction of carom had the highest degree of viscosity-suppressing effect as compared to other spices and herbs. With increasing concentration of carom, the peak and final viscosities of rice starch decreased; the onset, peak, and end temperatures of rice starch increased; and granular swelling of potato starch was restricted and delayed. The viscosity-suppressing effect was not caused by pH or small molecular carom compounds such as mineral salts and phytochemicals. A protein polymer in carom extract with an Mw of ~2.08 + 0.10 x 105 Da and isoelectric point of ~3.5 was found responsible for the suppression effect. The protein fraction completely denatured at ~83oC. Micrographs of SEM showed that carom protein appeared as raisin-like clusters. The ability of carom protein to suppress the peak viscosity of starch was also observed in potato, tapioca, glutinous rice, waxy maize, waxy rice, rice, sweet potato, maize, wheat, and pea starches, suggesting that the effect was independent of the source and ratio of amylose to amylopectin. It was proposed that the protein molecules could be interacting with the starch granular surface and/or starch molecules. In-vitro starch digestion study showed that dialysed carom extract with rice starch caused an unusual increment in glucose release. The lower viscosity of the starch-carom gels and/or a carom enzyme stimulatory effect were proposed to be responsible for increasing the rapid breakdown of starch.

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  • Airline Passengers’ Pre-­‐Purchase Decision-­‐Making: A Case Study of International Tertiary Students in New Zealand : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Aviation at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Henderson, Jamie Thomas (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The number of students studying overseas is growing rapidly, driven largely by the desire for cultural exposure and greater access to higher quality institutes. With over 100% growth in the past 15 years, this sector also represents an increasingly valuable contributor to the global economy. However, until this point, there is yet to be any research on how this industry acts as consumers and whether they represent a distant airline customer segment in their own right. Airlines represent a significant facilitator of international study. This is particularly true in countries such as New Zealand, which receives 99% of its international visitors by air. Over 100,000 international students currently study in New Zealand, with nearly a third studying at a tertiary level, representing a significant number of generally independent and informed consumers. The aim of this study was to determine if international students represent a unique and distinct customer segment for airlines. This was assessed by how they purchase airline tickets online and whether they conform to the behaviour of more generic customer groups such as leisure or business travellers. This included an examination of how information is searched for and how various purchase criteria are evaluated to make a final decision. A dual-­‐phased, qualitative methodology was adopted with a sample of 40 international students from the Massey University Manawatū Campus. The first stage of the study involved an online observation where participants where asked to search for and purchase airline tickets as if they were doing so for their next journey to or from their home country. This was screen recorded and analysed to show the search patterns and information evaluation that lead to the final purchase decision. Stage two consisted of a semi-­‐structured interview asking participants to explain their search and evaluation process, including the factors that were most influential in their purchase process and why. The results indicate that the unique preferences of international students render them a distinct customer segment for airlines. The majority searched through online travel agents or indirect distribution channels. There were three levels of evaluation criteria were established, with price being the most influential factor in purchase decisions, followed by stopovers (number and length), schedule of international flights and baggage allowance. Definitive flight characteristics (aspects that can be completely defined prior to purchase) and brand appeared to be more influential than more intangible service attributes, which were largely expected or taken for granted and not considered by many participants. Generally, the international students in this study were found to be highly price sensitive, disloyal and not overly patient with respect to travel duration.

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  • Ignorance is Bliss: The Construction of Homelessness in Online News Media in Aotearoa/New Zealand : A thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Science (Thesis Only) in Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Mandeno, Celia A (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    As an entity central to our society the news media provides us with narratives that we access as resources in order to construct our understanding of individual and global people, groups, organisations, and phenomenon (Silverstone, 2007). This thesis explores the news media’s construction of homelessness in Aotearoa/New Zealand based on articles sourced from online news media provider stuff.co.nz. The dominant narrative presented through the analysed articles is one that promotes a construction of homelessness that identifies this phenomenon as an issue resulting from individual deficits and personal failings. The narrative of individual deficit is supported through the use of ignorant framings of homelessness that are filled with hegemonic silences. These silences allow for a notable absence of narrative regarding the structural causes of homelessness as a social problem. Through predominantly constructing homelessness as a phenomenon linked to individual deficit the narrative allows for a construction of homelessness that supports the neoliberal ideals of New Zealand’s current right wing government and its use of a penal based welfare system.

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  • An inquiry into students' and teachers' perceptions and use of small group work (SGW) teaching and learning experiences within an international school environment : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Second Language Teaching at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Cameron, Rebecca (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Research into 21st century education has consistently indicated that a key element of preparation for the contemporary workplace is the fostering of skills in collaboration, including the ability to negotiate with others. Furthermore, the advantages for language learners (LLs) in the midst of collaborative small group work (SGW) teams has been demonstrated time and time again in the literature. The approach undertaken drew on Exploratory Practice (EP), evolving into an inquiry into the perceptions of Diploma Programme (DP) school students and their teachers. Ultimately it provides insights into their views on the implementation of a SGW approach as a means of gaining access to grade level curriculum within a multilingual, International Baccalaureate (IB)-accredited school environment, in Germany, where the core curriculum in delivered in English. Data was gathered from the students and teachers in this particular context using multiple data-collection tools, including both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews over a period of ten weeks. The findings suggest that, overall, both teachers and students have a favourable view of a SGW approach. However, a number of implications have also been drawn regarding the polarity of perceptions uncovered in some instances, specifically with regards to the teaching and learning of subject specific language, and the degree of scaffolding that effective use of SGW requires. The study culminates with several recommendations such as the fostering and maintenance of an institutional climate that celebrates diversity; the on-going professional development for teachers in SGW management techniques and practices; the need for institutional investment in terms of sufficient time and space to implement SGW training, as well as time and purpose-built spaces to deliver SGW more effectively; and finally more active collaboration between teachers and their students, for guiding and informing pedagogical practice, and specifically aimed at enhancing the outcomes for ELLs within similar international school settings.

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  • The Church of Worship : an exegesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Fine Art at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Francey, Joanne (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The Church of Worship is a cult-like religious hyperreality performance and net-based project that explores and negotiates the parallels between religious devotion and celebrity adoration demanded by popular culture. This thesis uses the postmodern semiotic concept of hyperreality through Jean Baudrillard’s simulation and simulacra, as it’s theoretical framework. The project also explores Persona as a method for exploring the parallels between celebrity and religious icons or the concept of the ‘Hero’. The outputs of the church of worship include; a digital space of worship, performances, literature, and a series of overly refined fine art photographs. This project uses humour, abjection, and consumer and pop-cultural critique as central modalities.

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  • Effect of breed on thermal pain sensitivity in dogs : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Zoology at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Bowden, James (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    A problem in assessing pain sensitivity in animals is the variability among individuals within a species. Thermal nociceptive threshold (TNT) testing is used to measure pain sensitivity in animals. However, little research has been done on within species differences in pain sensitivity, with most studies focusing on the effectiveness of analgesics. This research was carried out to see if there was any variation in baseline TNTs in different dog breeds. To determine TNTs, a heat stimulus was applied to the leg of a dog using a new device that could be remotely activated. This removed the need to restrain the dogs. The time and temperature at which the dog responded behaviourally was recorded. The TNT of dog was recorded six times in a one-hour session, once a week, for four consecutive weeks. In the first experiment the repeatability of harrier hound (n= 11) TNTs over time and the effects of the initial thermode temperature were examined. The results indicated that TNTs were repeatable over the daily test, session however they were affected by week of testing, thermode and initial thermode temperature. It was concluded that using a consistent elevated initial thermode temperature was more consistent than the natural starting temperature. The aim of the second experiment was to investigate differences in TNTs between three dog breeds: harrier hounds, greyhounds, and huntaways (n=10 per breed). A breed effect was found whereby huntaways took significantly longer to respond than harrier hounds and responded at higher temperatures than greyhounds and harrier hounds. There were no differences between greyhounds and harrier hounds. This study provides the first scientific evidence of breed differences in pain sensitivity in dogs. It is concluded that there were differences in thermal pain thresholds between the three dog breeds tested. The study supported the use of TNT testing on dogs and offered new insight into ways to improve the reliability of threshold testing. Future work should use more breeds, evaluate pain sensitivity in other modalities, and assess the effect of analgesics on TNTs in dogs.

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  • The Actin-binding Protein Moesin and Memory Formation in Drosophila : A thesis presented to Massey University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biochemistry

    Freymuth, Patrick Stephen (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Moesin is a cytoskeletal adaptor protein that plays an important role in modification of the actin cytoskeleton and the formation of dendritic spines, which may be crucial to long-term potentiation. Moesin has also been found to be overexpressed in brains affected by Alzheimer’s disease. Despite being identified as a potential memory gene and linked to several neurological diseases, its role in memory has not been evaluated. The role of Moesin in the Drosophila melanogaster brain was investigated by characterizing the impact of modulating Moesin expression on several aspects of development and behavior. Moesin is involved in both brain and eye development. Knockdown and overexpression of Moesin led to defects in the development of the mushroom body, a brain structure critical for memory formation and recall. Further, knockdown of Moesin throughout development resulted in a significant deficit in long-term memory. Additionally, knockdown of Moesin restricted to adulthood also resulted in a significant deficit in long-term memory, which suggests that Moesin also has a non-developmental role in memory. Further, this requirement for Moesin in long-term memory was traced to the alpha/beta and gamma neurons of the mushroom body. Through the use of a phosphomimetic Moesin mutant that mimics the phosphorylated, activated form of Moesin, the regulation of Moesin in the Drosophila brain was analyzed. Expression of this mutant in neurons disrupted photoreceptor development in the Drosophila eye and a novel sensorimotor phenotype attributed to its expression in the brain was identified resulting in a defect in stereotypical climbing behavior. These results suggest a critical role for Moesin in general neurological functioning and the molecular pathways involved in its activation require further investigation.

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  • Reporting Error in Aircraft Maintenance: are engineers reporting safety concerns? : A thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Aviation At Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Twyman, Kirsty (2015)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Aviation accidents seldom occur as the consequence of an isolated incident, but as the result of a series of contributing factors. The industry has focussed on detecting and predicting these casual factors to support accident prevention. However, the complexity of aircraft maintenance errors makes them somewhat harder to capture. One method adopted to support error identification is error-reporting systems. The primary aim of study was to identify if reporting systems were being utilised by maintenance personnel. The secondary aim was to distinguish the factors that contribute to maintenance personnel rejecting reporting systems as a supportive tool. This was achieved through an online questionnaire. Due to a lack of research on error reporting and usability of reporting systems by aircraft maintenance personnel it proved difficult to use an existing survey, so survey questions were developed from an extensive literature review and a focus group made up of front-line personnel. Survey questions focussed on reporting system design, company attitude, error recognition and finally maintenance personnel personality patterns. Results showed several issues affected reporting system usage including lack of company support, inadequate training, and lack of feedback. Perhaps the most significant discovery were engineers believing that they would report error, but were inadequately able to recognise error. Although regulatory authorities and organisations themselves are seeing the benefits of a positive reporting culture the current study showed there are still significant issues with current reporting systems, without these inhibiting factors being addressed the industry cannot solely rely on self-reporting to manage error.

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  • An Investigation of Nutrition Risk among Hospitalised Older Adults Admitted to the Assessment, Treatment and Rehabilitation Wards of Waitemata District Health Board Hospitals : A Thesis Presented in Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics Massey University, Albany New Zealand

    Patel, Darshan Arvind (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Background: The proportion of older adults in New Zealand is increasing. Studies shows compromised nutrition status is prevalent in older adults, and can exacerbate poor health. It is therefore important to identify those who are malnourished, or those who are at nutrition risk for early nutrition intervention. Nutrition screening tools allow for the identification of nutrition risk status and initiation of nutritional care to result in improved health outcomes. Current data on the prevalence of nutrition risk in hospitalised older adults in New Zealand is limited. Design: Cross-sectional, observational study as part of a multicentre prospective study. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of nutrition risk among older adults (65-84 years) in the Assessment, Treatment and Rehabilitation (AT&R) wards of North Shore and Waitakere Hospitals. Potential nutrition risk factors including dysphagia risk, muscle mass and hand grip strength will also be investigated, as well as other relevant physiological and socio-demographic risk factors. Methods: Participants were recruited within five days of admission to the AT&R wards. Face-to-face interviews and assessments were conducted on the wards. A questionnaire incorporating participant characteristics, health and support data and validated screening and assessment tools were used. Nutrition risk status was assessed by the Mini Nutrition Assessment-Short Form, dysphagia risk status was assessed by the Eating Assessment Tool, cognitive status was assessed by the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and muscle mass was assessed by bioelectrical impedance analysis. Hand grip strength was measured using a hydraulic dynamometer. Results: A total of 89 participants took part in the study. Nutrition risk and malnutrition was evident in 43.8 and 27.0 percent of the study participants respectively. Indicated by the Mini-Nutrition Assessment-Short Form, participants with poor nutritional status were more likely to report reduced food intake, unintentional weight loss, requiring aid with activities of daily living, having previous dietetic input and being at risk of dysphagia compared to participants with ‘normal’ nutritional status. Conclusion: A high percentage of hospitalised older adults recently admitted to the AT&R wards had compromised nutritional status. Routine screening is highly advised to identify nutritional risk and instigate nutritional care.

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  • Japanese ESL students' use and perception of English linking and intrusive sounds : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Second Language Teaching at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Wickins, Glenn (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study investigates the use of linking and intrusive sounds in English by Japanese students studying university preparation English as a Second Language (ESL) courses at a tertiary institution in New Zealand. Such students covet a native-like accent, which in part comes from the ability of native English speakers to resolve the interruptions in the constant stream of language that they are producing. Producing a constant stream of English sounds more “natural” and “fluent”. Native English speakers have options to help them do this, which are called sandhi. This study focuses on six such features of connected speech: linking /j/, /w/ and /r/ sounds which are only pronounced when the following word begins with a vowel; and the intrusive versions of the same three sounds used to remove hiatus (interruptions in the flow of speech) between two vowel sounds. The purpose of this study is to investigate potential links between the usage of sandhi techniques and the current proficiency level of learners to see how teachers can best encourage the use of these “natural-sounding” features. By collecting speech samples from 38 participants and comparing them to the linking patterns of native English speakers as reported by other studies, this study endeavours to draw some conclusions about the usage of sandhi in Japanese ESL students.

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  • Implementation of lean, agile or leagile in consumer electronic retail companies : a comparative study between China and New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master in Logistics and Supply Chain Management at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

    Xiao, Jun (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Since 1960s, a large number of researchers have focused on how organisations have made large investment to streamline their supply chain to improve customer satisfaction and increase their internal productivity, all with the aim of achieving a competitive advantage against competitors on the market. Much research has been conducted on lean management techniques, aiming to reduce the costs of supply chains by minimizing their length and agile management aiming to increasing the robustness and flexibility of supply chains. An emerging field of research combines the two principles indicating that an organisations success lies in the combination of both. This is the case in the consumer electronics industry. The consumer electronics industry generates an array of products and services increasingly used in nearly every human endeavour, now deeply entwined in our social fabric, electronic products and systems now support critical aspects of communication, education, finance, recreation, and government. In the past few years, China in particular have become increasingly important in the consumer electronics as well as other industries. As an importer to New Zealand, a market for consumer electronic goods has been rapidly amplified over the years introducing a market for more relevant companies to be established and the market competition to become more competitive. This research focused on the implementation of lean, agile and leagile strategies in four consumer electronic retail companies from China and New Zealand. It is aim of this research to better understand the inner supply chain management strategies and practices of these four companies, and analyse how these strategies improve their supply chain performance. Finally, the research will find out what New Zealand’s companies should learn from China’s successful companies by comparing these strategies and identifying the environments these four companies operate in. This research will aim to uncover characteristics associated with the success of Chinese consumer electronics companies, specific to lean, agile and leagile strategies and see whether New Zealand has the infrastructure to gain the same competitive advantage using these strategies. Keywords: supply chain management, lean, agile, leagile, consumer electronic retail industry

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  • The Whalemen of Foveaux Strait, 1829-1850

    Irwin, Cecil H (1948)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Description: iii, 187 p. [9] leaves of plates : ill., diagrs., maps. Notes: Original lacks p.160. Thesis (M. A.)--University of Otago, 1948. Microfilm. 1 reel microfilm (negative).

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  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

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  • One Pot Double Network Hydrogels: Progress Towards Synthesis of Applicable Crosslinking Agents

    Sutherland, Peter Hugh (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    Our work initially looked at the possibility of being able to synthesis a double network hydrogel in just one free radical polymerisation. We intended to carefully select three compounds based on their copolymerisation reactivity under free radical conditions. This reactivity would generate a tightly cross-linked network first, followed by a loosely cross-linked network in one process. The hypothesis was tested by a Monte-Carlo simulation which showed that this two network state was achievable with known reactivity ratios. This work primarily focuses on the synthesis of novel cross-linkers based on N-vinyl pyrrolidone (1). This monomer has the necessary copolymerisation ratios with methyl methacrylate for this project, so simple difunctional analogues of 1 were designed. The synthesis and purification of these analogues proved not to be straightforward, and in the end only very small amounts of a suitable material were obtained. While the idea has merit, new ways of synthesising the key cross-linker still need to be found.

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  • The impact of patents on New Zealand's biotechnology and genetics services sectors

    Green, Aphra (2008)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    x, 155 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 151-155. University of Otago department: Law

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  • W. E. Gudgeon : his contribution to the annexation of the Cook Islands.

    Currie, Ernest Rowland (1963)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf iv-v.

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  • Customary international law in National Courts: a comparative analysis

    Bottermann, Uwe (2000)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    88 leaves :maps (1 in pocket) plates ; 29 cm. Bibliography: p. 83-88. University of Otago department: Law. "October 2000"

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