17,196 results for Masters

  • Igneous and hydrothermal minerals and textures in the offshore Canterbury Basin.

    Newman, Rowena Jane (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Canterbury Basin is located on a passive margin on the east coast of the South Island, developed by the rifting of the New Zealand continental fragment from Antarctica in the Late Cretaceous. Well cuttings produced during petroleum exploration in the offshore Canterbury Basin have been examined for secondary minerals and textures. Minerals and textures have been identified primarily from optical examination in reflected light, with a particular focus on producing high-resolution images. Additional identifications are made using thin sections, SEM, XRD and XRF analysis. The focus of this study is the Clipper-1 well in the Clipper sub-basin as it contains the most abundant mineralisation and covers the full depth of the Canterbury Basin sedimentary sequence. Examination of cuttings from this well has revealed intrusive igneous carbonates and native metals including iron, aluminium and copper. The trace element concentrations in the igneous carbonates indicates they are derived from crustal material. Textures indicating fluidisation and recrystallisation of sedimentary material are also present. The proposed mechanism for producing these unusual mineral assemblages is a late Pliocene or younger mafic intrusion into the schist basement of the Canterbury Basin. The igneous carbonates are inferred to be derived from melting of carbonates in the schist. The native metals have been produced from melt due to highly reducing conditions produced by interaction of the intrusion with coal and limestone. The combination of native metals and igneous carbonates with a conspicuous absence of typical silicate igneous rocks is inferred to represent a new type of intrusive environment that has not previously been described in the scientific literature.

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  • 7,8-Dihydroneopterin and its effect on the formation of foam cells.

    Davies, Sian Patricia Mary (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Atherosclerosis (Heart Disease) is an inflammatory disease caused by the formation of plaque within the arterial wall. In response to inflammation, monocytes enter the artery wall, differentiate into macrophages and take up altered low-density-lipoprotein (such as oxidised-LDL). This oxLDL is taken up into the phagocytotic macrophages via the action of the scavenger receptors. If more oxLDL is engulfed than the cell can process, they further differentiate into lipid-loaded foam cells. These are the main cell type found in atherosclerotic plaques. The scavenger receptor CD36 is responsible for 70% of oxLDL uptake by macrophages. Previous studies show that CD36 expression can be down regulated by the antioxidant, 7,8-dihydroneopterin. This research focuses on the effect of CD36 down regulation by 7,8-dihydroneopterin on foam cell formation. Human macrophages prepared from monocytes purified from human blood were incubated with copper oxidised LDL for up to 48 hours. Macrophage accumulation of the sterols was measured using a high performance chromatograph (HPLC) method developed as part of this project. The HPLC analysis measured: cholesterol, cholesteryl-oleate and -palmitate and 7-ketocholesterol accumulation within human macrophages. A flow cytometry procedure was developed where the strongly adherent macrophages could be lifted from the tissue culture plates before immuno staining for CD36. Effect of incubating macrophages with 7,8-dihydroneopterin on the formation of foam cells was studied by measuring the lipid content by HPLC and flow cytometry measurement of CD36. HPLC analysis showed non-cytotoxic levels of oxLDL produced a large accumulation of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in the macrophages. Cholesterol, 7-ketocholesterol and cholesteryl-oleate and -palmitate concentrations in the cells rose significantly over the first 24 hours and stayed at a steady level for the following 24 hours. CD36 levels was further analysed on human macrophages. This study shows that foam cell formation can be measured using human macrophages. 7,8-Dihydroneopterin treatment resulted in a reduction of cholesterol and oxysterol uptake back to basal levels. It also reduced CD36 cell surface expression by a third. These results suggest that even a small reduction in CD36 cell surface expression may have a large effect on foam cell formation. This is another mechanism by which 7,8-dihydroneopterin protects against atherosclerosis developing.

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  • Distribution, occurrence, and identification of mosquito species in the Tongatapu Island Group, Kingdom of Tonga

    Swan, Thomas (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Mosquitoes pose a serious threat to the economy, health status, and biosecurity of countries around the world. Mosquitoes kill an average of 700,000 people per year. The global expansion of air, sea, and land transport networks has greatly enhanced the spread of mosquitoes internationally. In the Pacific, the number of mosquito-borne diseases occurring has been on the rise in recent years, possibly as a result of human-mediated dispersal of larvae and adult mosquitoes. The Kingdom of Tonga has had numerous outbreaks of dengue fever and chikungunya virus in recent years. Previous research has catalogued species occurrences and distributions throughout Tonga. However, it is unknown whether new species have arrived in Tonga, and if distribution of previously found species has changed since the last comprehensive survey in 2006. Present research aims to update the literature by conducting a mosquito survey at 84 sites across the four islands of Tongatapu, Pangaimotu, ‘Oneata, and ‘Eua to record the distribution and occurrence of mosquito larvae. Nine mosquito species were collected: Aedes aegypti Linnaeus, A. albopictus Skuse, A. tongae Edwards, A. horrescens Edwards, A. vexans nocturnus Theobold, Culex annulirostris Skuse, C. albinervis Edwards, C. quinquefasciatus Say and C. sitiens Wiedemann. The collection of A. albopictus is the second time that this species has been recorded in Tonga. Moreover, the spatial extent of this species throughout Tonga was far greater than previously recorded. A major outcome of this survey has been the creation of an identification key for the mosquito larvae species of Tonga. This key should increase the accuracy of positive mosquito larvae identifications in Tonga. Mosquitoes were more frequently collected in artificial (e.g., used car tyres, fuel drums, containers) than natural (e.g., pools, ponds, tree holes) habitats. Car tyres, water containers, fuel drums, fridges, washing machines, and ponds were the most common habitats in which mosquito larvae were found. Aedes aegypti, A. albopictus, and C. quinquefasciatus were the three most common mosquito species collected, whereas A. tongae, A. horrescens, A. vexans nocturnus, C. annulirostris, C. sitiens, and C. albinervis were less frequently found. Multiple logistic regression analyses indicated that habitat volume had a significant positive effect on the presence of A. albopictus and A. tongae, whereas conductivity had a significant positive effect on the presence of C. annulirostris. Additionally, the volume by temperature interaction was a significant predictor of species presence for A. aegypti, A. albopictus, and C. annulirostris (as habitat volume increases, the effect of temperature went from neutral to negative). This suggests that larger, cooler habitats favour colonisation by these species. The number of artificial habitats (particularly used car tyres) present may have significantly increased since previous studies. Management should therefore focus on implementing community-run mosquito projects aimed at reducing the number of artificial habitats capable of being colonised by mosquito larvae. Covering, tipping out water, and infilling these habitats with soil to prevent mosquito oviposition is a pragmatic and straightforward mosquito control solution. This should immensely reduce the abundance of mosquitoes and may prevent disease outbreak in Tonga.

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  • Characterising landscape and sea level dynamics to predict shoreline responses over the next 100+ years in a high energy tectonic setting, Kaikoura, New Zealand

    Berger, Hannah Victoria (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis examines local scale landscape dynamics and coastal responses to climate change along the tectonically active, high energy Kaikoura coastline, South Island, New Zealand. In New Zealand, the majority of urban infrastructure is built along low-lying coastal plains. As a result, expanding coastal communities face increasing exposure to coastal hazards, which will potentially be exacerbated by climate change-induced adjustments in sediment supply, wave climates and sea levels, amongst other factors. Sea level around New Zealand has been predicted to rise between 0.8 m and 1.0 m by 2115 as a response to increasing global temperatures. In Kaikoura, local relative sea levels may vary from regional projections based on local sediment dynamics in response to; local tectonic uplift and co-seismic sediment delivery, increased rainfall and storm intensity, ocean climate and tides. Local sediment dynamics are important to consider when managing relative sea-level variations, in terms of assessing erosion response affected by sediment supply. New Zealand Coastal Policy Statement (NZCPS, 2010) Policy 24 states that the effects of climate change on coastal sediment dynamics should be factored into 100 year hazard risk assessments. To this date there has been no combined assessment on tectonic, climatic, and anthropogenic controls on local sediment dynamics, to predict mixed sand and gravel morphology response to future climate change and sea level variation along the Kaikoura coastline. The main objective of the research is to predict how coastal geomorphology in Kaikoura is likely to respond to local tectonic and climate change- induced adjustments in landscape and sea level dynamics over the next 100+ years. In order to fulfil the research objective, the primary focus of this research was developing a conceptual framework for the preliminary assessment of local sediment dynamics as part of a sea-level rise response matrix. The methodology was developed using a Kaikoura area case study, including the coast between the Hapuku and Kahutara Rivers, Kaikoura Peninsula and the adjacent coastal progradation plain, and Seaward Kaikoura Ranges. This area encompasses key coastal sediment processes and controls in a small well-constrained region that produced findings that can be scalable to other areas in New Zealand and elsewhere. Tectonics, climate, and human interventions were identified as the main controls on local sediment dynamics in Kaikoura. Key physical (faults, watersheds, landforms) and anthropogenic (hard/soft engineering structures, regulatory frameworks) factors influencing the sediment dynamics were assessed at different temporal and spatial scales. Various climate, river gauge, and beach survey data alongside local tectonic assessments were used to characterise and assess each control. Determining how each control influences local scale sediment dynamics proved challenging in a relatively sparse data context. Rainfall, ocean climate, and beach profile data analyses provided sufficient information to construct a conceptual model for the preliminary assessment of local sediment dynamics, how tectonic and climate change-induced adjustments could affect sediment supply and how future relative sea level may manifest in the Kaikoura region.

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  • The extent of imagery in New Zealand company annual reports : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Studies in Accountancy at Massey University

    Simpson, Linda Louise (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Imagery, and in particular photography, has become a regular and sometimes spectacular feature of company annual reports. From a broad perspective, photography can be seen to have a multiplicity of functions in society including the presentation of a factual, documentary view of the world, providing an interpretative art form, being used as advertising, and even being seen as pure entertainment. Photography can be seen to reflect the nature of society, while simultaneously altering and constructing society values. As the New Zealand Government continues to advocate free-market policies, resulting in more and more decisions about the nature of New Zealand society being put into corporate hands, concerns are being voiced regarding the degree to which New Zealand citizens have a democratic vote on how their society is constructed. These concerns relate specifically to the nature of corporate values, and how they impact on New Zealand society. A logical place for a statement of corporate values to be found is the company annual report. This study explores and investigates the use of imagery in company annual reports by using the imperatives contained in the political economy of accounting: be normative, be descriptive and be critical. Two questions are specifically addressed. Firstly, an empirical investigation is made of the extent to which imagery has been present in some New Zealand company annual reports for the period 1970 - 1997. Secondly, these annual reports are examined to determine whether, from the perspective of the researcher, company values that inspire and underlie company activities are reported by the use of imagery. In this way, imagery in annual reports may highlight a direct link between company values and social values in general. This study is important in that if companies use imagery, and in particular photography, to report their company values it may contribute to further understanding of the constitutive nature of the company annual report from a broad societal perspective, rather than from that reflected only in the accounting and financial numbers. This also has consequences for the nature of the corporate social report, an area growing in importance in the accounting field. This study may also reveal previously unknown features regarding the role accounting plays when it attempts to represent some aspect of a company's activities. Key Words: Annual Reports, Imagery, Corporate Social Report.

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  • Is the boundaryless career an organisational benefit, liability or irrelevance? : an investigation into boundaryless career competencies, career success and intention to leave : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Boyd, Charlotte Rebecca (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis asked whether contemporary organisations are faced with a paradox: are boundaryless career competencies linked to career success but also organisational turnover? Employees of a large New Zealand organisation (n= 568) were surveyed using an intranet based questionnaire. Through analysis using structural equation modelling, the best fit model showed that people who demonstrate a high level of investment in career competencies were also likely to show a high level of career success but, contrary to expectations, people who are successful in their careers are less likely to think about leaving the organisation. Therefore, contrary to boundaryless career theory, inter-organisational movement is not necessarily the goal for contemporary career actors. It may be that people stay in an organisation despite, or even because, they are investing in boundaryless career competencies. Furthermore, people who see internal opportunities for mobility are less likely to consider leaving, while people who see external opportunities for mobility will have a higher intention to leave. Hence whether people with high career success stay or go may depend on whether the organisation allows for expression of career competencies. It may be that internal opportunities trump external opportunities, or vice versa. This research is valuable in three key ways, providing: (1) the operationalisation of career competencies, tentatively shown to link to career success, for use in career management and further research (2) findings which question the key boundaryless career assumptions of mobility and the end of the organisational career (3) an interpretation of results suggesting non-significant effects of age and gender may be due to allowance for shifting priorities and context in the model. In light of these findings the Chameleon Career is suggested as an alternative metaphor to the boundaryless career, to reflect the need for the individual and the organisation to adapt to the changing environment.

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  • Ideal procurement system for New Zealand private sector construction clients : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Construction at Massey University

    Wan Ismail, Wan Norizan Binti (2007)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Making the right choice of a procurement system at the onset ensures successful project delivery, a satisfied client, a successful service provider, and a reputable construction industry. Research has shown that client's requirements have not been properly addressed due largely to wrong choice of procurement systems. This research aims to identify the priority needs of clients and the appropriate procurement system that can ensure the delivery of satisfactory outcomes. Investigations were limited to the views expressed by private sector construction clients, consultants and contractors, registered with their respective umbrella organizations in New Zealand. The descriptive survey method was used, which involved pilot interviews and structured questionnaire surveys. Content analysis, multi-attribute analysis and rank correlation tests were used in the analysis of the data. Results showed that clients' would prefer a procurement system that can ensure the delivery of the project within time, budget and quality/specification targets. Other priority needs include fixed price tender, competitive/ lowest price tenders, separate service provider for the design and management of the construction, life cycle cost, risk preference and to accommodate variation orders without incurring financial penalties. Construction management type of procurement system offering responsibilities for monitoring and coordinating the construction process is the ideal procurement route that could best meet the needs of the New Zealand construction clients. However, the sequential traditional procurement system is the most commonly used; clients are not prepared to adopt any other system that could better meet their procurement needs. The most influential reason for this is the perceived risk evasiveness of clients in the adoption of other systems which are not tried and tested. The use of partnering clause in the prevailing sequential traditional system is recommended to ensure win-win outcomes for all stakeholders and to motivate service providers to deliver more satisfactory outcomes to their clients. Keywords Construction clients, construction industry, clients' needs, construction management, procurement system.

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  • Ideology versus practicality : a case study in rural education : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education at Massey University

    Ball, Teresa (1988)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This case study attempts to provide a historical account of the first twenty five years of Feilding Agricultural High School. This coincided with the Principalship of L.J.Wild. The School curricula was sexually differentiated and chiefly aimed at providing courses which prepared rural boys and girls for their future vocations as Farmers and Farmers' wives. During the period 1922-1946, a polarity of expectations was apparent in post-primary education. The producers of rural education were endeavouring to foster knowledge thought appropriate to rural consumers. However, rural consumers were demanding an academic knowledge unrelated to rural life as it conferred social and educational advantages. Whilst Wild deplored the hegemony of the academic tradition, he was compelled to reproduce it. If he had not compromised between demands for a successful agricultural course made by the Department of Education and those for an academic course from the parents of his pupils, Feilding Agricultural High School would not have survived its first three years. Wild early realised that if he was to serve the Feilding community effectively, he would have to offer a multilateral and comprehensive form of education. This research has been undertaken from a historical perspective.

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  • Host-race specificity in the endemic pygmy mistletoe Korthalsella salicornioides (Viscaceae) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Plant Biology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Pearson, Sofie Margaret (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Korthalsella Tiegh. is a genus of stem hemiparasites in the family Viscaceae, represented in New Zealand by three endemic species: K. clavata, K. lindsayi, and K. salicornioides. The most host-specific is K. salicornioides as it parasitizes two main host genera Leptospermum (Myrtaceae) and Kunzea (Myrtaceae), while the other two species are considered generalists parasitizing a wider range of host species. K. salicornioides is naturally uncommon and sparse, although it can be locally abundant on occasion. Mistletoe populations are at risk primarily due to habitat destruction and subsequent loss of hosts. Cross-infection experiments in K. salicornioides provided some insight into the presence of putative host races, as better mistletoe seedling establishment success rates were apparent when the maternal and recipient hosts were the same. However, because previous molecular sequence data (nuclear internal transcribed spacers and chloroplast trnQ-rps16) for K. salicornioides were not informative about specific host-races, more rapidly evolving molecular markers might be expected to detect host races. In this study, next generation sequencing was used to develop novel microsatellite markers for Korthalsella. Eleven markers were reliably amplifiable and the most polymorphic for K. salicornioides were used to genotype 272 K. salicornioides individuals from 16 populations. Across all populations few alleles were identified, and within-population assessment of genetic variation indicated that many populations have low levels of genetic diversity and high proportions of homozygotes. Despite the presence of few alleles, a high degree of genetic differentiation between most populations was detected and was found to reflect host species and geography. The findings of this study that Korthalsella salicornioides populations have low levels of genetic variation but host-specific races, has important conservation implications. The main conservational focus should be maintaining and increasing host Leptospermum and Kunzea populations. The spread of mistletoe seed on hosts within or between populations may also increase the chances of continued survival. However, it is imperative that genetic material comes from the same host species, and consideration should also be given to the geographic area, especially in the Wairarapa. This study provides insights into the population structure within and between the different host populations and suggests several interesting areas of future study.

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  • Listen to me : the relationship between an organisation's listening environment and employees' openness to change : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Business Studies (Communication) at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    McFaull, Nicola (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Change is a reality of organisational life. New technologies, globalisation, the vagaries of the economic climate, and internal organisational pressures drive change today faster than ever before. Yet failure rates for change can be up to 70%. Understanding the different drivers of change, and what promotes change success, is therefore critical. Researchers are recognising that change is essentially a human event, and that individuals have a major role in determining whether organisational change will be successful. Employees’ attitudes towards change determine whether they will support or resist it. The focus of this study is on employee’s openness to change, and the extent to which this variable is affected by the listening environment created in the organisation by the supervisor and also that created between team members. An online survey was carried out of 485 employees in one public sector organisation in New Zealand. Measures were taken of employee openness to change, team listening environment, supervisor listening environment and potential demographic contributors. Findings were that the supervisor listening environment had a moderate effect on employees’ openness to change. It also had a similar effect on the team listening environment. However, the team listening environment was found to have only a small little impact on openness to change. Four employee variables— position, tenure, age and gender—were considered, and all were found to influence the relationship between the supervisor listening environment and openness to change. This was especially so for managers, employees between 35 and 54 years of age, and female employees. The impact of employee characteristics on the openness to change variable was also looked at. The only demographic variable that had an impact on openness to change was the position an employee holds in the organisation. The implications of these findings for management is that the quality of the interpersonal relationship between an employee, and their supervisor, as demonstrated by how the supervisor listens to them, creates an environment where employees feel listened to, cared for and connected. This influences an employee’s willingness to support new and different things, that is, their openness to change. This contributes in turn to whether the employee will embrace change or resist it, and ultimately influences whether the organisational change will be successful.

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  • Maths Anxiety: Fact or Fiction

    Frankcom-Burgess, Gillian (2006)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Vitamin D and the burden of disease in New Zealand

    Grey, Corina (2008)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • In search of the interdependent self : explorations among Baptist church members in Jamaica and the United States

    Frey, Rosemary (2004)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Mild Traumatic Brain Injury among New Zealand Children: Improving Quality of Care in the Emergency Department Setting

    Sharpe, S (2009)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: To examine the occurrence of traumatic brain injury (TBI) among New Zealand children and to investigate the quality of healthcare delivered in the emergency department (ED) setting to children with mild TBI. Methods: A systematic review of the literature regarding the occurrence of TBI among New Zealand children was undertaken alongside a clinical audit examining the quality of healthcare delivered to children with mild TBI who were discharged home after assessment in a children's hospital ED in 2007. Medical records of a random sample of 60 children aged <15 years stratified by ethnicity and age were reviewed. ED processes of care for mild TBI were compared with best practice standards derived from guideline recommendations. Findings: The systematic literature review revealed important gaps in knowledge regarding the burden of mild TBI among New Zealand children. The clinical audit identified that processes of care designed to manage potentially life-threatening acute complications (e.g. selection of children for CT scanning to identify intracranial haemorrhage) were consistent with best practice standards. However gaps existed between current and best practice for aspects of care that could minimise risks of disability. For example, despite a high standard of documentation of data required for estimating the probability of TBI, this information was not applied to clearly identify children with definite or possible TBI. In addition, documentation deficiencies raised concerns regarding whether information is provided in a manner supportive of the cultures and languages of families/wh?nau, missed opportunities for injury prevention advice, and the adequacy of follow-up plans in the community. Conclusion: The identified gaps in research knowledge and quality of care in the ED setting require attention to develop effective integrated services that minimise the risk of disability following childhood TBI.

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  • Mainstream Early Childhood Teachers and Their Understandings of Pacific Education

    Jattan, Jasmin

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Abstract This research explores the views of eight mainstream early childhood teachers and their understandings of Pacific education. Pacific children in education continue to fall within the underachievement statistics in Aotearoa, New Zealand. This has remained of consistent concern over several decades. The Government has put into effect strategies specifically targeted towards Pacific children in education to try and change this. Considerable pressure has been placed on teachers to ensure accountability within their teaching practice, to prove they are providing the quality education necessary for Pacific children to succeed. The methodology I use to gather information is qualitative, with the use of semi-structured interviews. The use of semi-structured interviews allowed for the voices of mainstream teachers to be captured and heard. It also allowed me to gain insight into their ideas and thoughts on quality for Pacific children as well as the very real challenges faced in their practice with Pacific children in early childhood education. The findings indicated the need for relevant and continued professional development to ensure teachers were supported in their practice within the area of Pacific education. The findings also indicated a lack of confidence in mainstream early childhood teachers in the area of Pacific education. This led to teachers having a dependence on Pacific teachers and perceiving Pacific teachers as the only answer to be able to provide the quality needed for Pacific children. In conclusion, the findings indicated the need for teachers to examine their ideas of quality for Pacific children and to move beyond basic understandings of Pacific children and people to be truly effective in their teaching practice to support the learning and development of Pacific children today.

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  • Lake Taupo: A Multi-Sector Collaborative Partnership towards Sustainable Development

    de Jong, Josef (2011)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis has created a case study that centres on stakeholder engagement within Lake Taupo, documenting the largest environmental protection project in New Zealand. The purpose of the case study is to determine how multiple stakeholder perspectives affect the business case for sustainable development. In the late 1990s regional council, along with the community, realised that intensive land use was threatening the pristine quality of water. Forestry and sheep and beef farming are the two dominant productive sectors within the area. Science indicated that due to the porous nature of soil within the catchment, farming deer, dairy and sheep and beef, resulted in an increase of nitrogen entering the lake and consequently reduced water quality. A range of stakeholders, including local, regional, central government, along with many other private businesses, cooperated and engaged in an effort to ensure sustainable development could continue within the Taupo catchment. The process spanning more than ten years from 2000-2011 resulted in legislation that initiated a behaviour change to low intensive land uses. The partnership also included the establishment of a trust to administer the use of public funds to reduce the amount of nitrogen entering the catchment by 20 per cent. The multi-sector, stakeholder partnership, produced innovative methods to secure a future for sustainable development in Taupo. Policy documents and newspaper articles were analysed while interviews were conducted with a range of crucial stakeholders, including forestry trusts, government representatives, farmers and a range of businesses operating within the catchment. The results of the research suggests the involvement of such an array of stakeholders, enabled a coherent and all-encompassing strategy, due to the input from diverse public and private stakeholders, even if some stakeholders took a self-interested approach. The findings illustrate a business case that was created for many landowner stakeholders which aided in the creation of new business models. Engagement enabled the majority of stakeholders to see the perspectives of others because policy development was brought down to a community level. However there was an apparent lack of industry involvement from the farming sector as many stakeholders felt that the farming industry needed to play a crucial role, when in fact, they avoided the issues of their farmer members within the catchment and did not engage until it was too late. A large number of stakeholders felt that an uncertain environment was created due to legislation. Nonetheless the involvement of community groups and businesses such as the Lake Taupo Protection Trust (LTPT) and Mighty River Power (MRP) in trading nitrogen and carbon has enabled the creation of a sound business model for landowners. A sustainable business model by promoting the economic benefits to landowners ensured the farming community had support to generate new revenue streams. Therefore the uncertainty, as local legislation has not come into effect and the uncertainty surrounding a national and international Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS), has been diminished as these businesses engage with farmers. The realisation for landowners to rationalise their land for sustainable uses has increased their bottom line and decreased their nitrogen leaching, thus protecting the lake. The Lake Taupo case illustrated important learning‘s that can be applied to any environmental protection project. The inclusion of private and public entities can enable a sustainable future where businesses can be the ‗engines of change.‘

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  • Indicator organism sources and recreational water quality : a study on the impact of duck droppings on the microbiological quality of water at Hataitai Beach : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Microbiology at Massey University

    Abbott, Stanley Edwin (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    3 Articles at back all written by S Abbott

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  • Individualised instruction, attitude and achievement in mathematics learning : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Education at Massey University

    Naftel, Anthony Edwin (1974)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This investigation reports a quasi experimental study of an individualised approach to mathematics learning which was operated in a New Zealand Primary School at the Standard Three level. The emphasis in the study was on student attitude towards mathematics and achievement in mathematics. The research was based on the following questions:– 1. Does student involvement in an individualised programme in mathematics result in a significant change in their attitude towards mathematics? 2. Does student involvement in an individualised programme in mathematics result in a significant change in their mathematics achievement? 3. What relationship, if any, is shown between student attitudes towards mathematics and student achievement in mathematics? The research design was a 'Non-Equivalent Control Group Design' in which two experimental and two control classes were used. No significant differences were shown between the experimental and control groups on four separate factors and thus they were considered as equivalent matched groups. Teachers were matched on the basis of length of teaching service. To measure student attitude towards mathematics a Likert typescale suitable for the Standard Three level was developed, entitled 'My Feelings About Maths'. Achievement was assessed by a standardised test. Pre treatment tests of attitude and achievement were administered to all subjects. The experimental classes then undertook the individualised programme for a fourteen week period whilst the control classes followed a textbook based programme. At the end of the experimental period, post treatment tests of attitude and achievement were administered to all subjects. The experimental subjects completed a questionnaire to indicate their attitude towards the individualised programme as also did the experimental teachers. Both questionnaires were specially constructed for the study. Analysis of data showed a significant positive change in attitude in the experimental group. There was no significant change in attitude in the control group. Both groups showed a significant gain in achievement. Attitude towards mathematics and achievement in mathematics was found to be correlated positively, at a low level, for both groups at the pre treatment stage. However, at the post treatment stage the correlation was non significant for the experimental group. Some evidence was obtained of the differential effects of the individualised programme on children at different ability levels. There was also evidence of a sex difference interaction. A large majority of the students in the experimental group indicated very positive attitudes towards the individualised programme. Teacher attitude was also positive.

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  • Important biological and ecological aspects of Strepsicrates macropetana Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Plant Protection at Massey University

    Mauchline, Nicola Ann (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Strepsicrates macropetana Meyrick (Tortricidae) has a significant impact on eucalypt form and growth, therefore is an important insect pest of young plantations in New Zealand. The current research was undertaken to provide essential information regarding the biology, behaviour, phenology and chemical ecology of S. macropetana. All experiments were conducted within laboratories and/or glasshouses located at Massey University, Palmerston North, during the 1998/1999 period. The use of a cage containing eucalypt foliage enabled an efficient, self-maintaining method of rearing. A full life-cycle of S. macropetana was completed within approximately 54 days Female S. macropetana had an average fecundity of 40 eggs, with an egg to adult survival rate of 62.5%. The eucalypt species on which the larva developed on had an effect on the growth of S. macropetana. However, no one host species achieved optimal growth on all parameters When given a choice between eucalypt and non-host (apple) foliage, S. macropetana females oviposited more eggs on the eucalypt foliage, depositing significantly more on the lower surface of the leaf, predominately around the central mid-vein region. Between four and five generations of S. macropetana were identified in the field during a 12-month period. The abundance of S. macropetana was shown to be related to the larval host, and temperature. A significant relationship was also identified between pupal weight and these factors. The predominant natural enemy of S. macropetana in the field was identified as Trigonospila brevifacies (Hardy) (Tachinidae), in which larval parasitism rates of up to 45% were found. Sexual activity was predominant within the first and second hours of the scotophase. reaching a maximum when adults were three to five days old. Oviposition behaviour was most frequent around the second, fifth and seventh hours of the scotophase, peaking when adults were six to eight days old. Egg viability declined as female age increased, from 55% viability on day seven down to 31% on day nine Male S. macropetana were shown to be attracted to female S. macropetana in a Y-tube assay. Biologically active compounds were isolated from female S. macropetana, and the main compound was preliminarily identified as (E)-7-Dodecenyl acetate. This, in addition to moderate amounts of other compounds are likely to constitute the sex pheromone of S. macropetana.

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  • Implementing asset-based community development : a case study from the Philippines : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University

    Anna, Bona (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Within the alternative development paradigm, needs-based models have been critiqued for the part they play in accentuating local deficiency and thereby increasing dependency on externally-driven development. The asset-based approach to community development (ABCD) has been presented as a capacities-focused alternative, aimed at establishing community-driven development and promoting authentic local empowerment. This thesis presents a case study into ABCD as it has been applied in a developing country context, analysing it in relationship to some of the theoretical premises of the approach and the wider development literature. The research, undertaken on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines, describes how the ABCD model was implemented and adapted to local circumstances. The findings indicate that the ABCD intervention resulted in improvements within the case study community, particularly pertaining to the expansion of community facilities, livelihood choices, household incomes, individual and collective motivation, and community pride. Overall, this study endorses ABCD as an effective approach to development in the developing world, while at the same time highlighting issues associated with its implementation. Questions are also raised regarding three global development themes that emerged in the course of the study, namely the development of capacity, the management of social process and the meaning of empowerment.

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