17,208 results for Masters

  • Factors and consumer attitudes that affect the sustainable management of used mobile phones: A repertory grid analysis

    Coffey, Philip (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Used mobile phones with their small size but vast numbers, create a unique problem when it comes to managing the part they play in the creation of electronic waste (E-waste). Whilst previous studies have identified what consumers appear to be doing with their used mobile phones, there is also a need to better understand why they are doing it. This study investigated what factors appear to influence consumer attitudes towards adopting a more sustainable approach when dealing with their used mobile phones. A reuse, refurbish and recycle strategy was used as a lens to examine the current literature from which an initial model was developed. Using the repertory grid interview technique a group of participants was interviewed to try to determine their core beliefs when it came to managing their used mobile phones. Analysis of the interviews was completed using several analysis techniques including word clouds, percentage similarity analysis, and Honey’s content analysis. The results of the study indicate that consumers care about the effect of used mobile phones on the environment although the degree of concern appears to vary across individuals. In addition, it was identified that in general, consumers perceive reuse, refurbishing, and recycling all as positive ways to sustainably manage used mobile phones, whilst environmental awareness appears to play a significant role in engaging people with recycling and being a rational for storing used mobile phones. Finally, the study suggests that telecommunication providers when trying to improve engagement with takeback schemes should focus more on consumers’ environmental concerns and social norms, rather than financial incentives or promoting easy engagement.

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  • "A colour line affair" : race, imperialism and rugby football contacts between New Zealand and South Africa to 1950.

    Buckley, Mike (1996)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis is an attempt to construct an alternative tradition of New Zealand and South African rugby football contacts to 1950. It examines the wider social conditions of such contacts, unlike the existing plethora of rugby-centred chronicles of matches, tours, and sporting personalities. Rugby tours between New Zealand and South Africa before 1950 raised questions over the relationship between sport, race and imperialism. The manner that rugby reflected the divergent racial traditions in both societies thus challenges the cliche that sport is separate from wider social and political considerations. The thesis consists of an introduction, conclusion and four chapters. The chapters correlate with the New Zealand and South African rugby exchanges of 1921, 1928, 1937, and 1949. They are dominated by the themes of race relations and sporting imperialism, which form the context of the tours. Research is based on New Zealand newspaper sources; contextual material is derived from secondary sources.

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  • Human Culture and Cognition

    Gers, M (2008)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Human behaviour is largely influenced by culture. Culture evolves cumulatively over time. The origins of culture in our lineage necessitated the evolution of psychological biases so humans could tractably navigate the emerging information environment. I examine the nature of these biases and conclude that they are unlikely to be genetically coded to any significant degree. This is because of the flexibility such biases needed to possess in the face of fluid cultural environments and because of the developmental mechanisms of the brain. I further outline three possible views on what the nature of the information these biases act upon might be. First there is the view that cultural information is constructed and held in individual minds but does not flow in any meaningful replicative fashion between minds. Second is the view that culture is information distributed in a population and cultural evolution is the temporal change of this populationlevel information as a result of low fidelity individual copying events. Finally, I argue that meme theory, which asserts that culture is usefully seen as bits of information that replicate in transmission, is a fruitful model of cultural evolution. Keywords Cognition, cultural evolution, culture, evolutionary psychology, memes, neuroconstructivism, psychological biases.

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  • Supermarket Sales Data: Feasibility and Applicability in Population Nutrition Monitoring

    Tin Tin, S (2007)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The nutrition transition and global convergence on a high fat, low complex carbohydrate diet have led to corresponding increases in obesity and associated chronic diseases, now recognised as global public health problems. Population food and nutrition monitoring plays a critical role in understanding and addressing these challenges, yet current monitoring methods, such as national nutrition surveys, are not practical on a continuous (e.g. annual) basis. Supermarket sales data could fill a gap by providing detailed, timely and inexpensive food and nutrition information helpful in developing policies and predicting future trends. This dissertation aims to examine the feasibility and applicability of supermarket sales data in population food and nutrition monitoring; and includes two components: (1) a literature review of published research that has used supermarket sales data for various food and nutrition monitoring purposes, and (2) a research proposal involving use of supermarket sales data to evaluate ethnic and socioeconomic differences in food purchasing patterns in New Zealand and the multilevel determinants of any such differences. A systematic review of the literature was undertaken up to April 2006. Forty seven studies were identified, of which four were feasibility studies, 19 assessed population food purchasing patterns, and 24 evaluated nutrition interventions. Four feasibility studies showed promising results for using sales data (scanned data, commercially available datasets and grocery receipts) to assess population food purchasing patterns. Six main purposes of using supermarket sales data observed in this review were to assess the impact of policy changes on population food purchases; to examine the effect of food pricing on healthier food choices; to compare food and nutrient purchase patterns between population groups; to validate food consumption data; to identify factors related to food purchasing behaviours; and to evaluate nutrition interventions. Based on the findings of the reviews, it appears that supermarket sales data have great potential for supplementing population food and nutrition monitoring. Further research is recommended to address some methodological limitations such as restricted data coverage and issues related to capturing, coding and analysing of sales data. The findings of this review have been accepted for publication in an international journal and presented at an international conference. Based on the review, a proposal was written for research that uses electronic supermarket sales data to evaluate ethnic and socioeconomic differences in food purchase patterns and the multilevel determinants of any such differences. Such information is clearly important in New Zealand where the burden of suboptimal nutrition in terms of reduced quality of life, increased morbidity, premature mortality and associated health care costs is substantial and increasing, with a disproportionate burden falling on Maori, Pacific and low socioeconomic group. Since most New Zealand household food purchases are made at supermarkets, the proposed study will inform the development of effective policies, programmes and services to improve nutrition of these priority groups in a more focused and efficient manner.

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  • 'Tonga for the Tongans': Culture in Rights Interpretation in the Tongan Constitution

    Kelly, Danielle (2010)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Tonga’s Constitution is one of the oldest in the world. It is a remarkable document with a remarkable history. The Constitution opens with a firmly stated Declaration of Rights, extending over 32 provisions. Like many rights documents around the world, the rights provisions use open and absolute language. This thesis looks at the approaches of the Tongan Courts to interpreting these rights provisions. Particularly, it examines the relevance of culture in interpreting constitutional rights, focussing on the recent case Taione v Kingdom of Tonga. It argues that even within a conception of universal rights, it is undeniable that what may be considered an acceptable or permissible limit to a right varies between societies. These permissible limits are established by balancing the values protected by the right against other values. This paper argues that in finding the values for that equation, it is both possible and necessary to give regard to the values of the cultures within the relevant society. This allows rights to be meaningfully located within the society whose constitution is being enforced. It further argues judges must try to acknowledge the values that form part of their interpretation. Judges’ own values inevitably form part of their adjudication process, often supported by selected precedent. However, an overreliance on common law or comparative law precedent results in a cultural bias as culturally based values are introduced into the balancing process without acknowledgement. Because of the intimate link between culture and identity of a people, there is an obligation on judges in Pacific courts to engage with cultural values in constitutional interpretation, in order to ensure that there is legal recognition of the identity of the peoples to whom the Constitution applies. Meaningful engagement with cultural values requires a greater self-consciousness in constitutional interpretation: an attempt to include a greater articulation of values in areas of judgment that are typically value-silent.

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  • Management aspects of phosphate fertiliser use on hill country : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Farm Management at Massey University

    Stewart, Kenneth M (1983)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Farmer decisions relating to phosphate fertiliser use greatly influence farm profitability, and Farm Advisory Officers receive many requests for assistance in making fertiliser decisions. The Cornforth/Sinclair Phosphate Maintenance Model predicts the annual loss of phosphate from grazed pasture production systems. This model is studied in this thesis and used as the basis for an investigation of phosphate use strategies on a sample of Manawatu hill country properties. Alternative management strategies on three case study farms are analysed.

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  • Novel screening methods for the detection of Yersinia enterocolitica in infected blood used for transfusion : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Microbiology at Massey University

    Kendrick, Christopher John (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Between 1991-1996, 8 patients experienced rare life-threatening reactions that followed the transfusion of blood infected with Yersinia enterocolitica. The first reported case occurred in 1991 and was followed by seven others that directly caused or contributed to the death of 5 of 8 patients. Y. enterocolitica is a food and water borne infection of the gastrointestinal tract which in adults is often asymptomatic. An unknown number of those infected experience a period of self-limiting bacteraemia. The large volume of blood collected during donation phlebotomy may contain small numbers of bacteria that can increase in number during blood bank storage, producing potentially lethal levels of bacteria and toxin. Currently there are no reliable methods available to distinguish blood donations that present the greatest risk from those that present little risk. This thesis, reports on the evaluation of two techniques to prevent the transfusion of blood infected with Y. enterocolitica. The first, a molecular method, was used to amplify bacterial DNA in blood by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). A 425 bp product was amplified from DNA extractions of infected blood. Results showed that the technical complexities of the methodology, together with poor sensitivity and the need for large-scale donation sampling make PCR as applied for this purpose unattractive. An Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay was developed to detect current/recent infection with Y. enterocolitica in healthy blood donors. Polystyrene beads were coated with bacterial proteins to detect IgA antibody to Y. enterocolitica in human serum. The sera from donors of confirmed unit infections, paired sera from culture-proven Y. enterocolitica gastrointestinal tract infection and sera from volunteer blood donors were tested. Results showed that the sera of six bacteraemic blood donors tested contained elevated levels of IgA antibody. High rates of positivity (26/27), were detected in sera from culture-confirmed GIT infection and a rate of 4.04% seropositivity was found among 495 blood donors enrolled in a clinical trial. Results showed a strong correlation between IgA seropositivity, and recipient risk associated with the transfusion of blood heavily infected with Y. enterocolitica. The work demonstrated how the use of a simple screening test for recent infection, could be used to exclude high risk donations and improve the safety of blood transfusion in New Zealand.

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  • An investigation into a relationship between locus of control and attribution theory in the field of consumer decision-making : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Orr, Kathleen Blanche (1980)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present investigation examines a relationship between Rotter°s (1966) Locus of Control Theory and Kelley°s (1967) Attribution Theory in the field of Consumer Decision-Making. The main hypothesis tested whether there was a difference in the probability of choosing in favour of a product with consensus information between individuals who have a belief in external control and individuals who believe in internal control. Secondary hypotheses were also investigated to detail other aspects of this relationship. Firstly, it was suggested that with externally and internally controlled Individuals, the probabilities of choosing in favour of consensus and distinctiveness information will differ. Secondly, that the probability of choosing in favour of personal control, and non-personal control information will differ for externals and internals. Finally it was suggested that the probability that externals and internals will have their responses rated as external or internal respectively, will be greater than the reverse. The main hypothesis was not substantiated, however there was a strong trend in the predicted direction, suggesting the value of future research. Some support was found for the secondary hypothese. Results are discussed in light of social learning and attribution theories and suggestions for future research offered.

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  • Optimising central bank behaviour in a stochastic environment with uncertain credibility : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Economics at Massey University

    Croke, Hilary (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Central bank credibility is defined for the purposes of this thesis as the belief held by agents that the central bank will not renege on its commitment to the specified monetary policy objective. Agents' perceptions on both the integrity and ability of the central bank to achieve and maintain price stability affect the determination of actual inflation via expected inflation. In the past, theoretical models have attempted to capture credibility effects through the application of game theory to assimilate the strategic interaction that occurs between the central bank, the government and agents. For the most part, these models are simple in structure and combined with the limitations commonly attributed to game theory have been heavily criticised. The results derived from empirical analyses of credibility have also been subject to debate due to the directly unobservable nature of credibility. In the past, such analyses have used a variety of measures to proxy credibility effects. While it is generally accepted that expected inflation would perhaps be the most accurate indicator, expectations are equally as subjective as credibility. The results presented in this thesis are derived from simulations of the Reserve Bank's macroeconomic model used for forecasting and policy analysis (FPS). Given that the central bank faces uncertainty regarding its true level of credibility, it is necessary for policymakers to assume the level of credibility when formulating monetary policy. Depending on the specific disturbance that hits the economy, the combined effect of the bank's assumed and actual level of credibility can ultimately determine the success of the implemented policy. The main motivation of this thesis is to determine the extent to which the central bank benefits when it is aware of the fact it truly has credibility or whether the optimal policy response should always be based on the premise of no credibility. In order to provide a more realistic analysis, stochastic simulations of FPS are used. In this case, the central bank observes a combination of five impulses simultaneously hit the economy in the current period and taking into account the effects of the impulses from previous periods, formulates monetary policy depending on its assumed level of credibility. Despite the added dimension of uncertainty the central bank faces surrounding the occurrence of future shocks, the results indicate that the increase in output loss normally associated with a harsh policy response is minimal. By assuming a lack of credibility and thereby adopting a prudent approach to monetary policy, inflation variability is substantially reduced without any significant increase in output variability.

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  • Location of the free thiol group in bovine [beta]-lactoglobulin A, B, and C : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biochemistry at Massey University

    Brittan, Helen (1997)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Under non-reducing sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) conditions unheated samples of β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) A, B and C all run as a single band, the A variant having a slightly lower mobility than the B and C variants. Following heating of these samples to 110°C, two bands are seen in the monomer region of SDS-PAGE gels run under non-reducing conditions. As heat can induce disulphide exchange, the individual bands forming the doublet may represent species of the same molecular size but having different arrangements of the disulphide bonds. The band formed in the A variant as a result of heating appears to have the same mobility as the unheated B and C variants, while the band formed in the B and C variants as a result of heating appears to have the same mobility as the unheated A variant. Under reducing conditions only a single band was seen in both heated and unheated samples, and the mobility of this band is the same in all three variants. This indicates that the difference in mobility between variants seen in non-reduced samples involves disulphide bonding. If the difference in the mobility of the two bands seen in heated samples is due to a difference in the position of a disulphide bond, and thus the free thiol, then it is possible that the position of the free thiol group in the A variant is different to that of the B and C variants even in unheated samples of this protein. A difference in the distribution of the thiol could explain observed differences in the reactivity of this group. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the observed differences in the mobility of unheated samples of purified bovine β-LG A, B and C under non-reducing SDS-PAGE conditions is due to a difference in the location of the free thiol group within the primary sequence of these variants. This was achieved by reacting the β-LG variants with a radioactively labelled thiol-reactive reagent [1,4-14C] N-ethylmaleimide (14C-NEM), thereby attaching a radioactive marker to the free thiol group. Following labelling of the protein, carried out under conditions that did not induce band splitting, the protein was hydrolysed and the resulting labelled peptide was purified and sequenced. The free thiol group was found to be at residue 121 in β-LG A, B and C. Therefore differences in mobility during non-reduced SDS PAGE of β-LG A, B and C are not due to a difference in the location of the thiol group. However, results indicate that it is possible that, particularly in the B and C variants, there is a tendency for disulphide exchange to occur, even under relatively mild conditions. In establishing the conditions under which band splitting did not occur, the effect of exposure to various conditions on the mobility of purified β-LG variants on native-PAGE and SDS-PAGE was studied. The mobilities of caprine β-LG and porcine β-LG were also studied in order to further characterise the factors within the primary sequence of β-LG that have an influence on band splitting. With bovine β-LG A, B and C, band splitting was found to be both temperature- and pH- dependent. Protein concentration and the ionic strength of the buffer also appeared to effect band splitting. Heating also induced the formation of aggregated species, visible on both native and SDS-PAGE gels. The presence of aggregated material on SDS-PAGE gels indicates that disulphide bonding is involved in the formation of these species. On native-PAGE, material that ran as a smear between the monomer band and dimer band was observed following heating. The protein present in this region may represent monomeric β-LG that has been sufficiently denatured for its mobility under native-PAGE to be retarded. Comparisons of the amount of material present in monomeric forms under native and non-reduced SDS-PAGE suggest that multiple monomeric species of β-LG are present in heated samples. Storage at -18°C in SDS-PAGE sample buffer was also shown to induce changes in the mobility of bovine β-LG A, B and C, and of caprine β-LG, on SDS-PAGE. Storage under these conditions caused the aggregation of β-LG but did not induce band splitting. The banding pattern in the dimer region of the stored samples differed between the variants, with the A variant showing a banding pattern that was markedly different to that of the B and C variants and the caprine protein, which showed similar patterns. The bovine β-LG B and C and caprine β-LG showed similar tendencies to form aggregates, and had a greater tendency to form these high molecular weight species than β-LG A. These differences may be due to a difference in the reactivity of the free thiol group under these conditions, influenced by the substitution at position 118. Purified, unheated caprine β-LG ran as a single band in non-reduced SDS gels, and appeared to have the same mobility as the unheated bovine B and C variants under these conditions. Heating of caprine β-LG also induced the formation of a second band with a similar mobility to that of unheated β-LG A. Caprine β-LG has an Asp at position 64 (as found in bovine β-LG A) and an Ala at position 118 (as found in bovine β-LG B and C). The fact that in non reducing SDS-PAGE caprine β-LG runs as a band with a similar mobility to bovine β-LG B and C and a slightly higher mobility than bovine β-LG A suggests that the substitution at position 118 in the primary protein sequence may somehow be causing the mobility difference. Aggregated material was also seen in caprine β-LG following heating. Unheated samples of porcine β-LG ran as two bands under non-reduced SDS-PAGE. Heating the porcine β-LG did not appear to induce any change in the appearance of the two bands, and there was no evidence of aggregation of this protein. Bovine β-LG A, B and C and caprine β-LG all contain a free cysteine residue in their protein sequence. Porcine β-LG does not contain a free Cysteine and thus the lack of heat-induced changes to the banding pattern in porcine β-LG when compared with the bovine variants and caprine β-LG is possibly due to the absence of this potentially reactive thiol group. The presence of a free thiol group appears to be required both to induce band splitting and for the formation of higher molecular weight aggregates following heating. Band splitting is thus probably a consequence of disulphide interchange reactions, the interchange reaction in β-LG A causing a second band to run in the position of β-LG Band C, and the interchange reaction in β-LG B and C causing a second band to run in the position of β-LG A.

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  • "Lives overpromised" : the transition to adulthood and the 'quarter-life crisis' : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Rasmussen, Nikki Jane (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years there has been a lot of speculation and (often negative) stereotyping about 'Generation Y'. Many witty labels have emerged to describe the generation from an outside perspective, but few have explored the perspective of these young people as they enter the 'real world' and embark upon their 'adult' lives. Whilst the generation has had limited attention from the academic world, the concept of a 'quarter-life crisis' has emerged through the popular media, proposed by journalists Robbins and Wilner (2001). Although such a concept may be readily dismissed as media hype, or a fabrication of spoiled, whining 'Gen Y'ers, there is much evidence to suggest that the transition to adulthood today is much more complex and turbulent than that experienced by previous generations. Through six focus group discussions involving 26 members of Generation Y going through the 'quarter-life' (or 'emerging adulthood') stage, this study sought to explore how the transition to adulthood is experienced by young people in New Zealand, including the highs and lows, challenges and pitfalls; whether these years represented a time of personal 'crisis'; and how they felt about their future looking forward. Participants' stories suggested that many felt ill-prepared for the demands and decisions of the 'real world', which sat at odds with what they had been conditioned to expect. While not all of the participants experienced this phase as a 'crisis' in the true sense of the word, many found themselves disappointed with how life in the 'real world' was turning out, unsettled by the disintegration of their initial plans and dreams, and overwhelmed by the complexity of this life stage. Nonetheless, they clung to hopes that the "good life" and the "happily ever after" that they had long-expected would eventually materialise - that fate would intervene and deliver the destiny they felt they deserved. The findings highlight the mismatch between how young people are prepared for the transition to adulthood and how they experience it. The implications of this situation and recommendations for addressing it are discussed.

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  • Lived experiences of nurses as they engage in practice at an advanced level within emergency departments in New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Human Social Science (Nursing) at Massey University

    Davies, Mark (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    At this present time New Zealand has seventeen Nurse Practitioners™ none of whom work in the emergency setting; nonetheless emergency nurses throughout New Zealand are practising at an advanced level in departments nationwide. The aim of this research project was to examine the lived experiences of five nurses as they prepare for, and engage in practice at an advanced level within emergency departments in New Zealand. The theoretical framework for this project was one of phenomenological enquiry based on a synthesis of Husserlian and Heideggerian philosophy. Following a form of purposive sampling to select participants, unstructured in-depth interviews were used as the method of choice for data collection. The concept of data horizontalisation integrated within Colaizzi's (1979) procedural steps for data examination guided the analysis and findings of this work. Descriptions of the participants lived experiences, underpinned by Husserlian principals, identified eight subjects that were explored in-depth from their perspective. This was followed by further analysis, interpretation and discussion of the phenomenon under review from the researcher's perspective; guided by the fundamental elements of the Heideggerian approach to enquiry. The results show that there are numerous similarities to be had in common with our colleagues overseas in relation to the many issues that impact on nurses working in or toward advanced practice within emergency departments here in New Zealand. However there also exist issues that are unique to the New Zealand context and as such have the potential to impact either positively of negatively on the development of the advanced nursing role in this country, such as the Health Practitioners Competency Assurance (HPCA) Act 2003 and other legislation that relate either directly or indirectly to the scope of practice for advanced practitioners, whatever their area of expertise. The research process identified several concepts that require further debate and discussion; from which knowledge can be gained that will either add to or augment the body of knowledge that is required for the advancement of nursing practice within emergency departments here in New Zealand.

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  • Life orientation and life satisfaction : an exploration of a homeostatic model of subjective wellbeing : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology at Massey University

    Findlay, Rachel Helen (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The main purpose of the current study was to explore the relationship between life orientation (optimism-pessimism) and life satisfaction. Cummins' (e.g. 1998) homeostatic model of subjective wellbeing was used as the basis for this exploration. The model was proposed to account for the fact that population life satisfaction within Western countries is repeatedly found to fall within the range 75 ± 2.5 percent of the scale maximum score (%SMS). The theory proposes that optimism is involved in the regulation and maintenance of subjective wellbeing. Two other variables, self-esteem and control, are thought to be involved in the regulatory system, however optimism was explored in light of the limited research into the connection between this variable and life satisfaction. According to the homeostatic theory, extreme adverse life events can disrupt the homeostatic system, causing a temporary decline in subjective wellbeing. The sample consisted of 200 adults from the general population of New Zealand. These were volunteers recruited within shopping centres in the Auckland area. Participants were administered a questionnaire consisting of two scales; the Life Orientation Test-Revised (LOT-R) and the Personal Wellbeing Index (PWI). The LOT-R is a measure of dispositional optimism-pessimism, and the PWI is a measure of life satisfaction. Additionally, the questionnaire consisted of a section designed to elicit basic demographic information, as well as details pertaining to recent experiences of significant life events. The most notable findings were as follows: After controlling for the effects of student and outlier data, the average level of life satisfaction for the current sample was 71.01 %SMS; life orientation accounted for 42 % of the variance in life satisfaction; and the experience of significant negative life events caused a decrease in mean life satisfaction. It is concluded that, overall, the findings provide support for the homeostatic model. Further research is needed to clarify the nature of the relationship between life orientation and life satisfaction. Suggestions for future research, and implications for mental health, are discussed.

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  • "Look Mum, no hands!" : the effects of increasing opportunities for choice-making and independence for children with disabilities when using a Riding for the Disabled programme : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Bingham, Amie Olga (2005)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Many non-disabled people take for granted their ability to choose when they receive help from others. Those with disabilities are often denied this choice, having minimal control over their lives. Increasing literature and research advocate that children with disabilities should be allowed choice-opportunities, as this is an essential component of becoming self-determined. Increasing access to choice has many benefits, including increasing enjoyment, confidence, assertiveness, motivation, and performance. Furthermore, it has been shown to decrease challenging and undesirable behaviour. The current project investigated the effects of providing choice to children with disabilities while participating in riding sessions at the Riding for the Disabled. Furthermore, it investigated whether the children could become more independent when completing riding related tasks. The mastery of two routines (mounting and dismounting) was analysed. All participants improved in their mastery of routines, and thus their independence increased. The hypothesis that with the provision of choice and increase in independence, the children would express higher levels of enjoyment was supported. Those who see providing choice as a deleterious concept fear that children with disabilities will make poor decisions. The project investigated the effect of choice opportunities on the level of risk that the children engaged in when performing riding activities. It was found that the children did not expose themselves to any unnecessary risk despite the increase in control they experienced while riding. An alternating treatment design was used for eight single-case studies. Dependent variables measured were expressions of enjoyment, inattention, undesirable behaviour, level of risk, mastery of routines, number of prompts needed, and incidents of crying.

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  • The linkage between banking sector, economic fundamentals and the Indonesian currency crisis : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Economics at Massey University

    Nugroho, Agus Eko (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study shows that a link exists between the weaknesses in the banking sector, economic fundamentals and the rapid depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate. The weakness in the banking sector was strongly associated with the number of insolvent banks and the rise in foreign liabilities of the banking sector in the pre-crisis period. The increase in the ratio of trade deficit to GDP and the rise in the domestic and foreign interest rate differential largely contributed to the deterioration in the Indonesian economic fundamentals during 1990-1998. Somewhat surprisingly, the interaction variable between the ratio of foreign reserves to imports and the foreign and domestic interest rate is statistically significant. This finding implies that the impact of the change in the ratio of foreign reserves to imports on the change in the rupiah exchange rate is moderated by the magnitude of the foreign and domestic interest rate differential. Similarly, the change in the rupiah exchange rate resulting from a change in the foreign and domestic interest rate differential is moderated by the value of the ratio of foreign reserves to imports. Finally, the dummy variable used to capture the effect of a change in the policy of exchange rate regime shows that the abandonment of the pegged exchange rate regime led to the rapid depreciation of the rupiah exchange rate.

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  • Man in his time plays many parts : life stories of William Jordan : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History at Massey University

    Hickey, Carina (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    When the first Labour government was elected in 1935 William Jordan became both New Zealand's High Commissioner in London and New Zealand's representative at the League of Nations. Prior to his appointment Jordan had served nearly fourteen years as a Labour Member of Parliament.3 3 Malcolm Templeton, 'Jordan, William Joseph 1879-1959'. Dictionary of New Zealand Biography, updated 19 July 2002 URL: http://www.dnzb.govt.nz/ I first became interested in Jordan while I was completing a research exercise on New Zealand's reactions to the Sino-Japanese war in 1937. Jordan featured prominently at the League of Nations when the New Zealand government's stand on international issues brought it into conflict with British policy. He stood out as a significant figure of this period due to his personality and strength of character. As New Zealand's representative, Jordan spoke powerfully on international morality. His forthright speeches showed his courage, often in the face of pressure from other nations. He delivered speeches that were blunt, simple and often in plain undiplomatic language. Bruce Bennett described his, unpretentious, sincere, yet forceful speeches [which] brought him admiration at a forum noted for caution to the point of cowardice. His very simplicity, which some of his associates despised, was part of his magic.4 4Bruce Bennett, New Zealand's Moral Foreign Policy 1935-1939: The Promotion of Collective Security Through the League of Nations, Wellington: New Zealand Institute of International Affairs, 1988, p.14. Jordan's character and personality seemed distinctive and denoted him as a compelling historical individual. Notwithstanding his unique personality, Jordan was also a national figure in his time. When first appointed he was New Zealand's sole diplomatic representative. By the time of his retirement, after a record fifteen years as High Commissioner in London, he had been the country's best-known representative abroad. I was very intrigued to examine not only Jordan the man but to also explore a broader perspective and see how, as a distinct individual, he interacted within the social, cultural and historical contexts of his time.

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  • Replicability of the Silicon Valley in the North Shore City : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Management at Massey University

    Simicic, Zlatko (2003)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Over the past decade the theory of Industrial Cluster (Porter, 1990; 1998a) has received a significant attention because of its seeming promise to change the regional economies into thriving centers of wealth and innovative excellence comparable in success to celebrated places such as Silicon Valley in San Francisco Bay area. Porter (1990; 1998a) argues that such places derive their strength from geographic concentrations of highly specialized companies that are both competing and collaborating. In his view those concentrations also lead to increased interdependencies of firms through value chain relationship and expert knowledge spillover which are further factors that also attract new companies to locate in vicinity and thus in process enhance synergetic effects of the region. This thesis provides an alternative view which, being based on local conditions, argues that concentration of specialized firms does not necessarily, implies dynamics that lead toward kind of industrial cluster described by Porter. Specifically, this thesis argues that cultural foundation play a key role in determining the degree of interfirm connectedness and whether the business collaborative dynamics and interconnectedness seen in Silicon Valley will take place. Similarly, this thesis argues that concentration of specialized companies does not have to be driven by business enhancing factors of Porter's diamond model and that may be merely driven by lifestyle concerns and needs of entrepreneurs themselves.

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  • Portrayals of the Moriori people : historical, ethnographical, anthropological and popular sources, c.1791-1989 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History, Massey University

    Wheeler, Read (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Michael King’s 1989 book, Moriori: A People Rediscovered, still stands as the definitive work on the Moriori, the Native people of the Chatham Islands. King wrote, ‘Nobody in New Zealand – and few elsewhere in the world- has been subjected to group slander as intense and as damaging as that heaped upon the Moriori.’ Since its publication, historians have denigrated earlier works dealing with the Moriori, arguing that the way in which they portrayed Moriori was almost entirely unfavourable. This thesis tests this conclusion. It explores the perspectives of European visitors to the Chatham Islands from 1791 to 1989, when King published Moriori. It does this through an examination of newspapers, Native Land Court minutes, and the writings of missionaries, settlers, and ethnographers. The thesis asks whether or not historians have been selective in their approach to the sources, or if, perhaps, they have ignored the intricacies that may have informed the views of early observers. The thesis argues that during the nineteenth century both Maori and European perspectives influenced the way in which Moriori were portrayed in European narrative. Moriori, in accordance with the prevailing theories of race were deemed to be inferior to Maori, and therefore Europeans. However, the thesis argues that despite this there does exist a literature that holds Moriori in a more favourable light and that a shift in perspective was occurring sometime before 1989.

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  • Manufacturing industry in Marton : its origins, growth and present nature : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Bertram, David Ian (1970)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Marton can justly claim to be an ideal town for setting up secondary industries......."1 (1)Marton Development Council, n.d., 5. "..... The population over recent years has shown a steady increase and there are signs afoot that the potential of this centrally situated, well planned and solidily supported borough is being realised more and more and that a period of 2 greater industrial development and growth is imminent...."2 (2)Marton Development Council, n.d., 7. ".... The Borough of Marton has the fastest growth rate of any of the towns in the Wanganui Employment District..."3 (3)Marton Development Council, n.d., 7. ".... For its size, Marton must be one of the most prolific factory towns in New Zealand.... "4 (4)Marton Jaycee (Inc.), 1967, 31. ".... Originally the settlement's sole purpose was to service the rich country areas that surround it on all sides, but it has, in recent years, developed into a centre that is above average in industrial development....."5 (5)Young, 1966, 67. Such statements, gleaned from various articles and booklets about the town of Marton, suggest that, in terms of manufacturing industry, it is, in certain respects, atypical of other New Zealand towns of a similar size and has, in fact, considerable potential as a small, industrial centre. The Marton-born writer, too, was aware of certain other distinctive features of the town's manufacturing industry - for example, the virtual absence of industries for processing the produce of its agri-cultural and pastoral hinterland yet the presence of other industries using imported raw materials with markets of nationwide importance.

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  • Main strategies of internet-based Japanese language teaching and the associated risks : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Japanese at Massey University

    Tretiakov, Takako (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study formulates two models of using Internet in classroom based Japanese language education. The models identified, the static model and the dynamic model, can be used in planning the strategy of introducing Internet as an educational medium in Japanese language classroom. Apart from elaborating the features of the models, and clarifying their relationships to recognized foreign/second language teaching approaches, we determine the risks, associated with Internet based Japanese language education and consider the ways to mitigate them. Our study is backed by 2 surveys, and by qualitative and quantitative analysis of Internet search engine data and of a database of teachers' beliefs data. This study may be of value to Japanese language teachers and learners, education administrators and to designers of CALL software.

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