16,601 results for Masters

  • Fundamental rheological properties of processed cheese slices : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology in Food Technology at Massey University

    Faraay, Francis Melkior (1995)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Fundamental rheological properties of two types of processed cheese slices, Individually Wrapped Slices (IWS) and Slice On Slice (SOS), produced under different process conditions, were determined. Shear creep, shear stress relaxation, dynamic impulse measurements and confocal laser scanning microscopy were used to determine the rheological properties and the texture of processed cheese slices. The shear creep, the shear stress relaxation and the dynamic impulse halfsquare measurements were carried out using an Instron Universal Testing Machine. A Texture Analyser TA.HD was used for the shear stress relaxation measurements. Comparison of shear stress relaxation results between the two instruments showed agreement. The shear creep compliance of IWS cheese show higher values than that of SOS cheese at 21°C. On the other hand, the shear stress relaxation moduli indicated lower values for IWS cheese than SOS cheese at 21°C. This indicated that IWS cheese was more liquid-like than SOS cheese though there are no significant compositional differences. Higher shear creep compliance is related to less resistance of the cheese to deformation while lower shear stress relaxation modulus indicates less resistance to deformation. These results are also in agreement. The melting properties of the two types of slices were studied with dynamic impulse measurements. IWS cheese melted at a lower temperature (50°C) than SOS cheese (60°C). Microscopic structure indicates more protein-protein interaction in SOS cheese than IWS cheese, which had smaller fat globules evenly distributed within the protein network, thereby reducing the protein-protein interaction and making the network integrity weak, thus confirming the shear creep and shear stress relaxation findings. The rheological and textural differences between the two cheeses were attributed to different process conditions used during the cheese manufacture. These different process conditions are the heating temperature and time combination and the cooling rate. The comparison of static measurements, the dynamic measurements using small deformations and the microstructure to determine the properties of processed cheese is a useful tool to determine the effects of different process conditions. It might enable the choice of those desired process parameters such as temperature-time combination and cooling rate for various processed cheese types.

    View record details
  • He ahi kā, he poka rānei : to keep the fire burning or to extinguish the flame : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters degree in Education at Te Kupenga o Te Mātauranga, Massey University College of Education, Palmerston North

    Kenrick, Pani (2008)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    He Ahi Ka, He Pōka Rānei- examines the provision of support offered to beginning teacher graduates of a total immersion Māori pre-service programme. Based on a Qualitative Māori centred approach, the study focuses on the ways in which the induction process, self-efficacy and professional development programmes within various classrooms and educational settings contribute to supporting the beginning teachers in this study. Issues related to access and participation in such support programmes and the contributions of key personnel to the provision of beginning teacher support are also explored. Through researching beginning teacher's, information gathered and analysed could be used when preparing and planning for professional development programmes to support beginning teachers from total immersion pre-service teaching programmes.

    View record details
  • Ko au te awa, ko te awa ko au : I am the river and the river is me : a collaborative anthropology which explores the relationship between a hapu and the Whanganui River : thesis presented for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Anthropology, Massey University, Palmerston North

    Rudge, Amanda (1993)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Because "present experience always takes account of the past and anticipates the future" (Bruner in Turner 1986:8), this document marks a pause in the lives of the people that have contributed to it. While it acknowledges the histories of its contributors, it also looks to their futures, and it is the connections between the past, the present and the future that have been one of the underlying themes of this research. This thesis derives from a collaborative research partnership between myself, a Masters student in Social Anthropology, and the elders of the Ngati Tuera hapu. Because this research was instigated by the hapu's need for research into the cultural significance of the Whanganui river, this document has been designed to be applied in three ways. It will be used as a resource to facilitate two hapu developments; a traditional1 I use the term 'traditional' advisedly. Traditions, like the culture from which they derive, are dynamic and subject to change. A traditional fishing enhancement programme seeks to utilise the philosophy of resource management that existed before the arrival of Tauiwi, but will also utilise current technologies. fishing enhancement programme, and teaching modules in the school at Parikino, and as the other partner in this collaborative research, I present this document as the thesis component of a Masters degree in Social Anthropology.

    View record details
  • The prevalence of interpersonal conflict in the work place and its relationship to gender, functional position and style of conflict resolution : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a degree of Masters of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Doolan, Scott (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    At present there is limited research on the prevalence of interpersonal conflict in the workplace. This study developed an escalation model on interpersonal conflict in the workplace and used it to research the prevalence of interpersonal conflict in the workplace and its interaction with conflict resolution styles. One hundred and twenty three employees from a public and a private organisation responded to a questionnaire, which included the Rahim Organisational Conflict Inventory. The results of this study identified that the prevalence of interpersonal conflict in the workplace is very high and that this prevalence decreased as the intensity of the conflict increased. Furthermore, the findings suggested that peoples' use of conflict resolution strategies vary as the intensity of the conflict increases. Lastly, the prevalence of conflict resolution styles in this study did not match previous research findings on cultural differences in dealing with interpersonal conflict. The implications of this study are that extensive research should be conducted on the escalation model of interpersonal conflict in the workplace. This would establish national norms so organisations could use these to determine whether their organisation has too little or too much interpersonal conflict.

    View record details
  • Māori leadership : affecting positive change within primary education : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Education at Massey University, Palmerston North, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Wood, Andrew (2009)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis sought to examine the nature of Māori leadership within the context of English medium primary education. It sought to identify whether a style of leadership that was unique to Māori existed and whether or not the identified style or styles reflected in contemporary times in schools are underpinned and informed by values, practices and ideals inherent within Māoridom. Many aspects of Māoridom have not only endured despite the effects of colonisation but have in fact survived and flourished. Māori leadership is one such aspect. The findings reflect strong styles where values, ideals and practices which are strongly emphasised within Māoridom have all had an informing role for the participant leaders. The leadership styles, approaches and strategies identified within this study echo those of the past. In using the identified strategies, the Māori school leaders have facilitated the development of an educational environment and culture that is empowering and productive in making a positive difference for every child in the school and for the staff, parents and whanau of the school.

    View record details
  • Purification and characterisation of a secreted glycosidase, from the extreme xerophile Wallemia ichthyophaga : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree in Master of Science in Biochemistry at Massey University Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Miller, Taryn Angela (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    With recent pressure to reduce the environmental impact of leather production, research has been focused on the development of an alternative depilation method, as the conventional method for depilation contributes up to 60% of the total pollution produced. Contaminated salted ovine pelts stored at LASRA were easily depilated when drum washed, and the resultant leather was of good quality. The pelts were visibly contaminated with microorganisms, and it was thought that these may be secreting enzymes that loosened the wool fibre without damaging key structural skin components. Identification of the enzyme or enzymes was thus of interest. The microorganism/s responsible for the secretion of the depilation enzyme/s were isolated and identified through sequencing the 16S/18S ribosomal RNA genes. Depilation, using the crude secretome solutions, was then assessed using fresh ovine skin as well as SACPIC, a micro scale staining method used to assess skin structure. Unfortunately, none of the secretomes from either a single or a combination of the microorganisms isolated, had depilation activity. The secretome of W.ichthyophaga, a xerophilic filamentous fungus, which was consistently isolated from the contaminated pelts, was chosen to be characterised using proteomic methods. 1D SDS-PAGE gel/CHIP separation of the proteins in the secretome showed it contained mainly glycosidases, with no lipases, esterases, or proteases identified. Some of the proteins identified had suggested roles in resistance to osmotic pressure, while the remaining proteins were intracellular. Overall, 21 proteins were identified. A purification procedure involving AEX and SEC was successfully developed for the isolation of one of the glycosidases from the secretome. The resultant purified fractions formed a doublet band when analysed by SDS-PAGE. The reason for this remains unknown, but was shown not to be due to an impurity or heterodimerisation. The purified glycosidase was identifed as belonging to the GH3 family by mass spectrometry. It was found to have a pH optimum of pH 6.0, was optimally active at 10% NaCl, and was itself glycosylated. The glycosidase was able to hydrolyse both a- and ß- linked glycosidic bonds in di- and polysaccharides. Interestingly, both the disaccharide and artifical p-nitrophenol forms of galactose were not cleaved by the enzyme.

    View record details
  • The role of non-governmental organisations in the development context of East Timor : a case study of a local NGO, Yayasan Etadep (Yayasan Ema maTA Dalan ba Progressu) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University

    Ribeiro, Anacleto da Costa (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs) have been actors on the development stage longer than the World Bank, the United Nations or any other official agency. Throughout the 1980s they have played a greater role than previously because of their greater diversity, credibility and creativity. Therefore, they have now moved to the centre stage of development as significant development agents in the civil society sector. Being significant agents in development, it is important to understand their roles. The current spectrum of NGO activities has emerged from the 19th Century, and been shaped in the past 30 years by the search for alternatives and by emerging new needs and concerns. Realising the importance and relevance of understanding the role NGOs in development, this study seeks to assess the role of a local NGO, ETADEP, operating in the specific development context of East Timor. The situation in East Timor was unfavourable due to its unstable political status which has been the predominant factor affecting and shaping an NGO's work in this local context. Thus, to gain a better understanding of the role NGOs in East Timor, the assessment should be in line with the existing factors and problems faced by an NGO in this specific context. In addition, this study also attempts to define and classify local NGOs in East Timor i.e. ETADEP into an alternative typology. This study collects firsthand data through interviews, observations and secondary data from archival records or documents such as: reports, evaluations, publications. Documents were selected from ETADEP's files between the years 1987 and 1998. Informal in-depth interviews were also conducted with relevant individuals who have been either actors of grass-root development or partners of ETADEP. The findings of this study concludes that ETADEP though operated in such a unfavourable atmosphere has contributed to the process of improving socio-economic welfare of the rural community and sustainable development in East Timor through the strategy of strengthening local self-reliance groups and grassroots organisations. Specifically, ETADEP has functioned as: a) the facilitator of development aimed at improving the socio-economic welfare of the rural community; b) the communicator between the local government, donors and the local community and between the local communities; c) the embryo for NGOs and grassroots organisations; and d) the catalyst of innovations and participatory development approaches. The study has also identified that ETADEP, though having multiple identities due to its incapability to identify itself properly in such a situation has embedded the four defining characteristics to be considered as an NGO in this context. Thus, a tentative typology is developed based on four main essential descriptors i.e. orientation of activities, scope of operation, main forms of control and its links with donors. This scheme, therefore, has placed ETADEP into a multiple scheme typology. However, comparatively speaking, in terms of focus and scale of ETADEP's programs, it is more appropriate to categorize ETADEP as a development-oriented NGO.

    View record details
  • Challenging the myths : the lived experience of chronic leg ulcers : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Nursing at Massey University

    Bland, Marian (1994)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Leg ulcers are a chronic condition that affects a significant number of New Zealanders. While the management of the ulcers themselves has received much attention in the nursing and medical literature, little is known about what it is like to live with chronic leg ulcers, and how they impact on quality of life. A review of the nursing literature relating to leg ulcers reveals a focus on wound management, and a failure to appreciate the perspective of these patients. It is frequently stated in the nursing literature that these patients deliberately delay the healing of their ulcers to ensure continued contact with the nurses. This exploratory study utilised Heideggerian hermeneutic phenomenology to examine the experiences of five men and four women with chronic leg ulcers, revealing the comprehensive nature of the suffering that accompanies this condition. Much discomfort and distress is caused by the ulcers themselves, which is then compounded by the problems associated with the treatment regimes. The presence of ulcers impacts on virtually every aspect of daily life. Study participants had worked hard to minimise that suffering, with the differences created by the ulcers becoming part of a taken-for-granted way of being-in-the-world. They desperately wanted their ulcers to heal, and were prepared to do everything they could to achieve this. But the potential benefits of some treatment regimes must be balanced against the ongoing disruptions that such regimes would cause to their ability to lead a reasonably normal life. This study challenges the myths that surround patients with leg ulcers, and highlights the need for health professionals to move from a focus on wound management to understanding the specific needs of each individual within the context of their daily life.

    View record details
  • Integrated management : from concept to practice : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Resource and Environmental Planning at Massey University

    Rennison, David Stanhope (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    New Zealand's key environmental management statutes are notable for requiring the integrated management of resources. This thesis explores the extent to which integrated management is actually occurring between two different agencies operating under the Resource Management Act 1991 and the Conservation Act 1987. The level of integration between Tasman District Council and the Department of Conservation is analysed with reference to a case study of management issues along the coast of Abel Tasman National Park. The primary issue here is that increased human activity along the Park coast has attendant social and environmental impacts; these should be addressed in an integrated manner by both agencies. The concept of integrated environmental management is defined and explained by means of a literature review. Following this, the potential for integrated management in the New Zealand context is assessed by reviewing the requirements of legislation and relevant commentary. Subsequent to developing this theoretical framework, research investigations centre on the Abel Tasman case study. First, interviews are conducted with those who prepared the Proposed Tasman Regional Policy Statement and Proposed Tasman Resource Management Plan; and the Nelson-Marlborough Conservation Management Strategy and Abel Tasman National Park Draft Management Plan, amongst other practitioners. Second, these plans are coded; and the findings of both research methods are then analysed. It is shown that the degree to which integrated management can be achieved is dependent on institutional factors. New Zealand's environmental management regime contains both opportunities and barriers to the implementation of integrated management, and this is reflected in the case study. The extent to which integration is achieved between Tasman District Council and the Department of Conservation is limited, due to inadequate funding, staffing and statutory deadlines. Statutory and informal processes followed by the two agencies in preparing plans lacked the comprehensive interaction and effective co-ordination that are the key operational ingredients to integrated management. The lack of capacity within agencies is attributed to a lack of political commitment to the processes of integration. The intentions embodied in the legislation are being compromised by pressure on agencies and staff to be cost-effective. Nevertheless, significant improvements to the regime were noted by practitioners.

    View record details
  • Factors which influence the decision of sexual offenders against children to attend a sex offender treatment programme at Te Piriti or Kia Marama : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Norrie, Joan (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Treatment of individuals who sexually offend against children has been shown to be associated with reductions in recidivism both in New Zealand, (Johnston, 1996) and overseas (Gendreau, 1996). Laven (1993) and Jury (1993) found in two New Zealand studies of incarcerated child sex offenders that when they were offered treatment to help them address their offending they more often than not declined. Barbaree (1991) noted that offenders often present as denying, minimising, rationalising or being vague about their sexual offending behaviours. Treatment for incarcerated individuals who have sexually offended against children is provided by the New Zealand Department of Corrections Psychological Service specialist prison-based Child Sex Offender Treatment Programme at Auckland (Te Piriti) and Christchurch (Kia Marama). However, participation in the programme is voluntary. The main purpose of the study was to examine the effects of a motivational and educational pretherapy intervention, First Step, on factors such as Stage of Change and Victim Empathy which were believed to be associated with the decision to seek entry to the Sex Offender Treatment Programme. A secondary purpose was to investigate which factors the child sex offenders considered while making their decision to seek or decline treatment in the programme. The subjects were 104 male incarcerated offenders convicted of sexual offences against children under the age of sixteen years. They were resident in one of three minimum security prisons, Tongariro/Rangipo, Ohura and Waikeria, New Zealand. All of the subjects were referred by the prison Case Management Committee to Department of Corrections, Psychological Service for assessment when they arrived in the prison. Of the total of 104 participants, 39 attended First Step. The other 65 were involved in a related study (Knowles, 1997) at Waikeria Prison. They were included to provide additional information on select issues related to helpseeking. Participation was voluntary and access to the First Step programme was not contingent on participation in the study. Also, there were no custodial consequences (e. g., temporary paroles or early release) contingent on participation in the study. The design for the treatment portion of the study was a two by two factorial, repeated measures design with two conditions, a wait-list control and a treatment condition (First Step). An assessment of treatment readiness and victim-specific empathy was made using the University of Rhode Island Change Assessment (URICA) questionnaire based on Prochaska, DiClemente et al's (1982, 1985, 1989, 1991, 1995) Transtheoretical Stages of Change model and Marshall et al's (1995) Person Specific Empathy Scale which were administered at pre and post wait-list and treatment conditions. The results of this study provide important data for enhancing our understanding of the effects of a pre therapy intervention on motivation and of the factors that influence the incarcerated child sex offender's decision to seek entry to a Sex Offender Treatment Programme. There was evidence that the motivational and educational intervention, the First Step programme, had an influence on the way that the offenders thought about their offending behaviour. In particular, this was supported by a general pattern of movement through the Stages of Change as illustrated by changes in the numbers of offenders in identified Stages of Change clusters. The support for First Step further buttresses Barbaree (1991) and O'Donohue and LeTourneau (1993) proposals for the necessity, particularly in cases where the problem is denied, for a pre-treatment intervention designed to encourage a frame of mind that is more amenable to treatment entry and compliance. Some positive treatment produced changes were also noted on the empathy scale. Apart from a motivational intervention, other factors identified by the sample as being influential in the treatment-seeking decision-making process included both internal (e. g., desire for self improvement, acceptance of responsibility for the offending, denial of offending, fear and shame) and external (e. g., awareness of treatment procedures at the Sex Offender Treatment Programme, family support and custody conditions) factors. The discussion focuses on future use of pretherapy, motivational interventions and the integration of such factors.

    View record details
  • Behaviour change : identifying the external factors which help direct the effective management of stopping reoffending or help maintain recidivism : a study of driver offenders who have made a decision to stop driving while disqualified : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Social Work at Massey University

    Smith, Robyna June (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The prediction of criminal behaviour is perhaps one of the most central issues in the New Zealand Department of Corrections today. In order to understand more fully the human diversity involved in criminal activity, the current focus is on the psychology of criminal conduct and the internal variables operating to maintain this behaviour. Given the usefulness of combining a variety of predictors of criminal behaviour, both internal and external, the study attempts to redress the gap that appears to have emerged with the concentration on internal predictor variables. This endeavour is on a small scale. The research participants are a group of eight (8) recidivist driver offenders, who have completed the nine week phase of the Driver Offender Treatment (DOT) programme and ten (10) support people. An inquiry reveals their understanding of the external factors which either direct the course of recidivism or the effective management of their decision to stop driving while disqualified. The central argument, and one that has provided the motivation to carry out this study, is that external factors, such as support people, play a major part in the lives of offenders who have decided to stop or significantly reduce their reoffending. In the management of sentences, the Community Probation service has traditionally targeted its resources to the offender. The assumption of the current study is that factors operating in the offender's environment are also instrumental in the goal of reducing reoffending. It is proffered that these factors are given more emphasis in practice and resourcing issues. The present study is an exploratory one, with responses elicited from a sample of recidivist driver offenders and the people they identify as their key support people. Semi-structured individual, face-to-face interviews are instrumental in this process. The research project explores the concepts and themes that emerge, which are based on the perceptions of both groups of people. Commentary and research findings on the issues facing the target client group are also examined and the connections between this material and the perceptions of the research participants and their support people are investigated. Two major findings of the study lend support firstly, to the critical part that external factors play in the process of behaviour change when treatment is provided for disqualified drivers who are sufficiently motivated to stop driving. Secondly, findings support the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural model which combines elements of the principles of constructivism and plays a vital role in the intervention of high-risk offenders. It is found that it is this combination of factors which directs the effective management of the decision to stop driving while disqualified. It is hoped that the outcomes of this inquiry will have positive implications for professional practice and social policy for rehabilitation programmes in the Corrections arena.

    View record details
  • Sustainable land use on the East Coast : a case study of land use change in the Upper-Hikuwai catchment : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Development Studies at Massey University

    Zwart, Peter (1996)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis explores the principles of sustainability and applies them to the issue of land use on severely erosion-prone hill country in the East Coast region of the North Island of New Zealand. Sustainability is found to require a biophysical bottom line, implying a need for planning to establish threshold levels of protection for particular classes of land. The study uses a locally developed system of land classification which takes into account the physical causes and remedies of soil erosion as the basis for such a plan. This sets the biophysical bottom line to which land use and management must seek to conform, but above which, remain flexible, according to other societal objectives such as equity or efficiency. The history of land use change, and the policy response to the issue is reviewed for the region, and compared with this plan. The plan is then applied to one catchment subject to severe soil erosion, and where changes in land use are in process and the changes assessed and compared with the attitudes of the landowners and the context in which they have made their decisions. It was found that considerable progress had been made recently towards greater compliance with this plan and toward a pattern of land use more diverse and more consistent with the varying physical capacity of the area. This has been particularly facilitated by assistance from central and local government between 1988 and 1993. The study concludes, however, by highlighting the degree of favour shown to forestry interests over those of farming interests in current method of public support for erosion control. The study anticipates the eventual blanket afforestation of the catchment under this scheme.

    View record details
  • The diet of the New Zealand long-tailed bat, Chalinolobus tuberculatus : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters in Zoology at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Gurau, Alix Larissa (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The long-tailed bat (Chalinolobus tuberculatus Forster, 1884) and the lesser short-tailed bat (Mystacina tuberculata Gray, 1883) are both endemic and the only extanct bat species in New Zealand (Alexander, 2001). The long-tailed bat and the short-tailed bat are considered threatened; they are listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Animals and the Department of Conservation (DOC) lists long-tailed bats as ‘nationally vulnerable’, and lesser short-tailed bats as ‘nationally endangered’ (O'Donnell, Christie, Hitchmough, Lloyd, & Parsons, 2010). Research conducted on long-tailed bats has focused on roosting choice and behaviour with limited investigation of their diet. This leaves big gaps in our knowledge and due to both species inhabiting exotic plantation forests there is also the possibility for the bats to be important insect pest control agents. Insect fragments were identified from New Zealand long-tailed bat faecal samples collected from under known roosts and harp traps in Kinleith Forest and Pureora Forest Park in the central North Island, New Zealand. In total 2247 fragments were mounted on slides (1335 from Pureora and 912 from Kinleith) and 15% of these were unidentifiable (346). Over both study sites, Diptera made up the largest percentage of the diet with 40%, Lepidoptera comprised 24%, Coleoptera 18%, Trichoptera 0.8%, and Hymenoptera 0.36%. Whole mites or mite remains comprised 0.8% of all fragments. Eleven fragments in total were found to be from Lepidoptera larvae which contradicts previous observations of long-tailed bats not eating terrestrial, non-winged insects. There were significant differences in the diet of the bats in native forest with the bats in exotic forest, showing long-tailed bats can be flexible in regards to the environment they live in whilst maintaining a normal diet. The diets of the same two populations of New Zealand long-tailed bat were assessed by using stable carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) isotope analysis of faeces. This is the first instance where stable isotope analysis has been used to investigate New Zealand bat diet. Faecal samples from a population of New Zealand long-tailed bats in a Fiordland forest and a population of New Zealand short-tailed bats from Pureora Forest Park were also analysed to use as a comparison. The δ13C (‰) and δ15N (‰) values of bat faeces were similar to those of Lepidoptera, Diptera, and Coleoptera implying these are the insects eaten most often. Only minor similarities were found between the δ13C (‰) and δ15N (‰) values of bat faeces and those of Trichoptera, Hymenoptera, and Hemiptera implying these insects are eaten less often. New Zealand long-tailed bats in Pureora Forest and Kinleith Forest have opportunistic, generalist diets. There were no significant differences in the diet of the bats in native forest with the bats in exotic forest showing bats inhabiting exotic plantation forests can maintain a good quality diet similar to bats inhabiting native forests. There were also no significant differences in the diet of Pureora Forest long-tailed bats and short-tailed bats which is strange considering the bats occupy different niches. In this study by combining physical search of faeces and stable isotope analysis, new information on the diet of the long-tailed bat was gained. After comparison, both techniques have their merits and that, if possible, it is best to utilise both when investigating diet.

    View record details
  • The bacteriostatic diglycocylated bacteriocin glycocin F targets a sugar-specific transporter : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biochemistry at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand

    Drower, Kelvin Ross (2014)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Appendices 6, 10 and 19 available electronically in a CD with the hard copy in the library

    View record details
  • A job full of conflicts : the experience of women child protection social workers in New Zealand : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for degree of Master of Social Work

    Hunter, Marnie (1997)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This qualitative study researched the experiences of ten women who worked as care and protection social workers in the Children, Young Persons and Their Families Service in New Zealand. Although there is an extensive literature on social work theory and practice, little has been recorded internationally or in New Zealand about the experiences of women social workers throughout the span of their working lives. This thesis sought to redress that imbalance. The participants had a minimum of three years and a combined total of eighty three years, working in the agency. They were interviewed about their general work experiences, the way they practised social work, the effects of the work on them, the influence of feminist ideas on their work and about identifying as lesbian or as heterosexual in their workplaces. The participants' general work experiences were analysed within the framework of a theory about women's career choice and work behaviour. Their social work practice was analysed against a number of sets of practice principles in the feminist social work literature. A chapter was devoted to exploring the experiences of lesbian social workers. The participants found their work satisfying and challenging but also stressful. This stress was greatly compounded by changes to the organisation's management practices which had arisen from the State sector reforms. These had generated an environment in which it was impossible to practise social work thoroughly and safely. The social workers' enthusiasm and hope was being sapped by the organisation's obsession with outputs, administration, and data collection. Guidelines for the future of statutory child protection services in New Zealand were developed, based on the participants' experiences.

    View record details
  • Deconstructing narrative therapy in practice : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Nicholl, Patricia Marie (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Narrative therapists have made claims as to how a narrative interview or series of interviews should be best structured. This thesis shows, through the analysis of a narrative interview, that these claims represent the practice of narrative therapy. However, several processes that narrative therapists have not explicitly noted as being critical for the successful attainment of the goals of this approach, have emerged as being of fundamental importance. These are the use of positioning, metaphor, indirectness and scaffolding. Their importance lies in that they facilitate an alliance between therapist and client and also minimise the possibility of opposition to the therapeutic process. In addition, they maximise the potential for the development and acceptance of alternative conceptualisations of the self and reality. Furthermore, they actively engage the person in the co-construction of meaning. This increases the likelihood that the newly constructed narrative will be conceptualised as reflecting reality, and as a consequence of this, that it will be acted on as such.

    View record details
  • Japanese culture reflected in the language : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Japanese at Massey University

    MacInnes, Mieko (1997)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Culture and language have influenced each other as they have evolved! Should this statement be correct, then second language learning becomes second culture learning. However, this fact is not generally known by most second language teachers and students. The focus of this study has been to examine how the Japanese culture is reflected in the language, and to demonstrate how cultural aspects can be accommodated in the learning environment. The teaching method used is called "Interactive Competence Approach" which integrates sociocultural competence with linguistic and communicative competence, while giving students an awareness, that learning the Japanese language is also learning its culture. The most effective method of cross-cultural training, "cultural assimilator" is employed to increase students' competence. The relationship between Japanese language and society is best illustrated in the use of politeness, especially honorifics. They are the core of Japanese polite expressions and reflect vertical and uchi/soto (in-group and out-group) social dimensions. This vertical and group oriented society is the reflection of the concept of "ie", a basic family unit. Ellipses and indirect expressions are also well-developed to consider other people's feelings and avoid confrontations. Therefore, using this style of language, it is natural then that the Japanese way of communication, which is often described as "implicit" and "indirect" has evolved. Finally, two major suggestions are formed from integrating these observations and findings: 1. JSL teachers should place more emphasis on politeness in interactions, and honorifics should be simplified. 2. JSL teachers should assist students in improving cross-cultural competence thus enabling them to unravel any social differences while making their own personal adjustments.

    View record details
  • The role of self-efficacy in perceived quality of life in people with both insulin-dependent and non-insulin dependent diabetes : a thesis presented in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Parry, Nerys Ceridwen (1995)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Diabetes Mellitus is an illness that affects more than 100,000 people in New Zealand. This study examined the variables which were thought to be most likely to impact on the quality of life of people with either Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (IDDM) or Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus (NIDDM). Diabetes requires a high degree of self-management on a daily basis. The challenges for people with diabetes are to maintain a healthy level of blood glucose by carrying out adequate self-care behaviours. It was thought these may represent barriers to unrestricted quality of life, and the study investigated the degree to which cognitive-affective processes were diverted into self-care and illness appraisal. The two groups were studied to investigate which psychological factors would influence perceptions of wellbeing, and whether or not the psychological areas of significance were correlated with blood glucose levels (HbA1C), depicting good metabolic control. Using a questionnaire survey method, this study examined the psychological processes of 99 people with diabetes (36 IDDMs and 63 NIDDMs), assessing in particular, their self-efficacy, perception of risk, and psychological control, all considered to be factors that would be likely to affect their quality of life. Measures used included illness appraisal, wellbeing and self-efficacy scales, as well as a small qualitative section eliciting personal comments. The findings indicated a moderate level of self-efficacy and wellbeing across the sample which was adversely affected when they were compelled to take barriers to effective self-care into account. Risk perception was considered to be inadequate, especially when correlated with other factors, suggesting that self-efficacy was maintained by sidelining the risks or threats of diabetes. On the whole, the sample were particularly effective at maintaining adequate weight through diet, and a significant proportion were not taking any medication at all. Severe hypoglycaemic episodes were rare. Perception of control was another issue which appeared to be adequate for the sample, but it was found that people's perceived control was a more cogent variable than actual metabolic control (as measured by HbA1C assay). It was possible to infer stages of self-efficacy according to the manner in which people responded. Drawing on self-efficacy measures found to be effective in assessing populations with chronic conditions, it was found that there was some support for the notion that resistance self-efficacy and coping self-efficacy were the mechanisms at work for these people. Comments from respondents showed a desire for more information and better public awareness of diabetes, and offered some insight into the mechanisms by which people maintain an adequate quality of life despite chronic illness.

    View record details
  • Lone mothers and paid work : a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Social Policy at Massey University

    Morris, Leonie (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years in New Zealand the Government's policy of coercing lone mothers on the Domestic Purposes Benefit (DPB) into paid work has been intensified. This thesis examines this policy and focuses on the following issues: what assists/impedes paid work for lone mothers, what policy measures are employed to facilitate and/or coerce DPB recipients into paid work, and how effective are these measures? Three research methods were used: • a comparative study of government policy towards lone mothers and their workforce participation in Sweden, the United States of America, Australia, and New Zealand; • a qualitative study of six women on the DPB to provide illustrations from lone mothers' perspectives; • analysis of material obtained under the Official Information Act to examine the assumptions behind government policy decisions on lone mothers. All findings confirmed that women on the DPB face a formidable number of barriers and obstacles to entering paid work. The principal issues were: • the lack of availability of suitable jobs; • the low level of the wages for jobs available to lone mothers; and • the lack of government provisions designed to help lone mothers reconcile their dual responsibilities as breadwinner and principal caregiver. In both Sweden and the United States lone mothers are expected to be in paid work, and in both countries lone mothers have high workforce participation. However, these countries pursue diametrically opposed policies. In Sweden an active labour market policy and extensive welfare programmmes support parents to combine parenting with employment. In the United States little support is provided, and if lone mothers cannot find work in the private sector they are often obliged to go on a workfare programme. The disadvantages to this approach are that many lone mothers in paid work still live in poverty, and they have a very high rate of leaving work and returning to the benefit because of the lack of support for them in the workforce. There is a danger that if New Zealand continues to follow the United States' policies, the same negative outcomes will predominate here.

    View record details
  • "It's just such a problem, really" : a discourse analysis of young women's talk on contraception : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Watson, Lucy (1998)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    A discourse analysis was undertaken of young women's discussion of their experiences and concerns with choosing and using contraception. Ten women, aged between 21 and 25, with experience of using contraception, were individually interviewed by the author using an open, loosely structured interviewing schedule. Transcripts of the interviews were made and formed the object of analysis. The focus of the analysis was influenced predominantly by Parker's conception of discourse analysis (1990, 1992). Six main discourses were identified in the participants' talk; the moral discourse, sexual desire discourse, natural health discourse, live life discourse, individual responsibility discourse, and equality discourse. Participants' use of the discourses was found to be concentrated around three particular topic areas; choosing and using contraception, non-use of contraception, and the responsibility of contraception. Women's discussion of the issues involved in contraception use involved a complex and often contradictory negotiation of the identified discourses. Participants predominantly drew on the discourses to explain their contraceptive decisions and preferences, to justify 'risky' behaviour, and to point out inadequacies in the range of contraceptives available. An examination was also made of the function of the discourses in Western society in general, and of their histories in Western culture. An understanding of women's constructions of the issues involved in contraception use is valuable for all women, as well as for health professionals and others involved in counselling and advising women in the area of contraceptive decision-making and use.

    View record details