43 results for Other

  • The social construction of femininities in a rural New Zealand community

    Gill, Erica Jane (2007)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 90 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 85-90). "June 2007"

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  • Late Quaternary geology of Glenorchy district, Upper Lake Wakatipu

    Kober, Florian (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 127 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Conservation genetics of island takahe (Porphyrio mantelli)

    Lettink, Marieke (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    ii, 66 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. A research report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Diploma in Wildlife Management. University of Otago department: Zoology. University of Otago Wildlife Management Report; no. 96.

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  • The Blackwater mine, Waiuta, N.Z.

    Graham, Archibald (1946)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 109 leaves :ill., facsims., ports. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 104-109. University of Otago : Otago School of Mines

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  • The tin mines of the Pahang Consolidated Company Limited.

    Cowie, A. B. (1953)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    73 leaves :ill., facsims. ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaves 71-73. University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • A thesis on the property of the Blackwater Mines Ltd., Waiuta.

    Jones, Lloyd Samuel (1938)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    45 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago : Otago School of Mines

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  • Thesis on the Blackwater Mine, Reefton District, New Zealand.

    Service, Harold (1934)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    79 leaves, [32] leaves of plates (some folded) :ill. ; 27 cm. Univeristy of Otago : Otago School of Mines. 2 diagrams in pocket.

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  • Thesis on the Blackwater Mine, Waiuta, New Zealand.

    Pearson, E. W. (1942)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    iv, 57 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. Thesis (Diploma of Associateship of Otago School of Mine)--University of Otago, 1942. University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • An attempt to devise a reliable and valid reading test for purposes of classification of pupils entering intermediate schools of New Zealand

    Thomson, John Stewart (1949)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    126 leaves :ill., Maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliography. University of Otago department: Education.

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  • Without work, nothing': A study of the changing attitudes towards the swagger in the 1890s

    Brownlie, Helen J (1980)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    The swagger has been preserved for posterity in the writings of John A. Lee in ‘Shining With Shiner’, ‘Shiner Slattery’, and ‘Roughnecks, Rollingstones and Rouseabouts’, as well as Jim Henderson's ‘Swagger Country’. But no serious attempt has been made to discover why the swagger began to die out during the 1890s. This essay attempts to trace some of these reasons: the changing country, the changing type of farming and the resulting changing attitudes towards the swagger, so that in a sense he was forced to conform or to become an outcast. The swagger, in early New Zealand, was part of a rural system, he had a place within the workforce, whether he was going to the farms, to the goldfields, or to the kauri gum areas. In a frontier society, the only way to get about cheaply was to walk. But overall the swagger is associated with the development of pastoralism, the big estates and runs, the generous owner or manager who provided hospitality in the form of shelter, food and work in season. Where wool was plentiful, and meat a waste product, it could be generously given out to all swaggers who called. It was a period when there was little in the way of social services - no poorhouse, no poor law, no minimum wage, no Factory Act (except one which applied only to women, but was largely unobserved). There were no labour laws, no old age pensions, no unemployment benefits, and no sustenance payments. When these welfare aids actually came into existence, as the majority did in the 1890s, there had to be a change in the composition and numbers of swaggers. Changes came about with the Old Age Pension Act of 1898, with the Industrial Conciliation Act of 1894, with the development of trade unions within the rural sector, and the establishment of the Labour Department in 1892 to coordinate work and workers. Throughout this essay, the reader must be aware that these changes were taking place at the end of the nineteenth century - New Zealand was growing up and the frontier-type swagger had no place in a modern society. Gradually his ranks diminished until only one part remained - the professional swagger, the man on the road out of choice. Chapter One, therefore, investigates what constitutes a swagger. It should be noted at this stage, that the swagger was indigenous to both Australia and New Zealand, therefore examples and more particularly verse have been taken from both countries, until Chapter Six, when we discuss the difference between the Australian and New Zealand versions. Chapter Two looks at the men within the swagger ranks, and their reasons for being there - for work, for personal reasons, for reasons beyond their control. Chapter Three looks at the changing attitudes of the people within the rural and urban systems. This change in attitude is significant because it meant that the swagger was no longer accepted as a necessity, but came to be regarded as a nuisance. The swagger was discouraged and therefore tended to decline in numbers. Chapter Four looks at explanations as to why the swagger ceased, and what happened to him. Chapter Five looks very briefly at why the swagger was revived in the 1920s and 30s, the depression swagger and in what ways he was different from his counterpart in the nineteenth century. Chapter Six, as mentioned before, looks at the differences between the Australian and New Zealand swagger. It will be argued that the feeling of mateship that the Australian swagger held so dear, was not so evident in the New Zealand context. Having come to the end of the essay, it is hoped that the reader will have a better idea of the forces behind the decline of swaggers on the road; the most notable being a changing attitude which the Labour Department motto sums up: 'Without work, nothing'.

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  • The black monk and the blue mystic : the writings and monochromatic paintings of Ad Reinhardt and Yves Klein

    Leiby, Bora Kim (2011)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    This dissertation is an examination of the monochromatic paintings and associated writings of Ad Reinhardt (1913-1967) and Yves Klein (1928-1962). Since its inception in 1918, the modern monochromatic painting has continued to fascinate, puzzle, and even upset viewers. Despite this, artists continue to explore this form. It would be unrealistic to assume that there is one artistic ideology that motivates all monochromatic painters. Trying to uncover all varying ideologies would be too difficult and require research based on the subjective writings of critics and historians. In an attempt to understand the monochrome from the artist's perspective I have analysed texts written by the artists regarding their own artwork. Not only did Reinhardt and Klein paint monochromatic images at the same time in history, but both documented their creative processes in writing. I have examined two edited collections of texts by these artists: Art-as-Art: The Selected Writings of Ad Reinhardt (1975) and the English translation of Overcoming the Problematics of Art: The Writings of Yves Klein (2007). The body of this dissertation uncovers similarities and differences in regards to formal aspects, functional roles, and sources of inspiration associated with these paintings. These include artistic rules regarding colour and line, the intended function of art in life, and a shared affinity for Eastern philosophy and aesthetics. While far from uncovering any universal monochromatic ideology, this examination provides some background on and appreciation for the creative process of monochromatic painting and a basic understanding of the reaction to the form.

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  • A miner's rights : the gold prospecting subsidy scheme in Central Otago 1931-1935.

    Goyen, Brigid A. (1983)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    vi, 88 leaves :ill., map, ports. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 84-88).

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  • Thesis on the Briseis Mine, Derby, Tasmania.

    Alexander, J. M. (1936)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    194 [1] leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Bibliography: leaf 192-[195] University of Otago department: Mineral Technology.

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  • Breach of promise of marriage

    Hickey, Maureen (1992)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    [iii], 58, [18] leaves ; 30 cm. Bibliography. Photocopied material.

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  • Diet of feral cats (Felis catus) in pastoral habitats of Canterbury, Otago and Southland : functional and numerical responses to rabbit availability

    Borkin, Kerry Maree (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    v, 63 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. "April 1999." University of Otago department: Zoology. University of Otago Wildlife Management Report no. 105.

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  • The rehabilitation of Napier

    MacFarlane, J. N.

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Digital copy stored under Section 55 of the NZ Copyright Act

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  • Superannuation and ideology : the search for an effective policy for the aged in New Zealand, 1974-1984

    Field, Mark (1987)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    The development of a superannuation policy in New Zealand since 1970 has been the result of a search for effectiveness in an area of large Government spending on welfare. The positions developed by the two major political parties has been pragmatic dictated by economic concerns and by political moves. For the Labour Party the passage of the 1938 Social Security Act had, in part, achieved the historical goal of their movement. In the post war era this led to a pragmatic approach to welfare based on the prevailing economic and social conditions. This is also true of the National Party; it had adopted the conventional wisdom of social security in an age of consensus politics. In the last fifteen years the debate over welfare has been one over a search for efficiency in a time of economic trouble. The issue has been whether the accepted principles of social security are still applicable now: can the state continue to fund large scale and expensive welfare measures out of general revenue? In the light of current economic trends this does not appear possible, then again it would be impossible for the state to give up the concept of social security without threatening its very existence. The debate is about the role of the state in the life of the individual. Today that role is firmly entrenched in providing for the welfare of the citizen. At present there is still unanimity about the need to maintain and improve welfare provisions, but now the real argument is about the best way to achieve these objectives. The debate over superannuation has been about achieving an adequate standard of living for our elderly citizens. Whether this has been achieved is open to dispute. At present new views are being expressed over the efficacy of our existing provisions. It is a change of direction and a reassessment of ideas about the role of the state. The state must remain open and receptive to these ideas in the future to ensure that an equitable society is maintained.

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  • Black and white art' : the depiction of Maori in cartoons, 1900-1920.

    Custer, Erika K. (1994)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    Typescript (photocopied)

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  • Notocene stratigraphy of the Fletcher Creek and Inangahua Junction areas, North Westland

    Lindqvist, Jon K. (1972)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    In the Inangahua and Fletcher Creek areas, North Westland, Greenland Group greywackes and argillites, into which the Tuhua Group granitic rocks have intruded, are unconformably overlain by lower Tertiary to lower Pleistocene transgressive and regressive sediments. Several reference sections in the Tertiary strata have been measured, of which the thickest totals over 1000 m, and is subdivided into the Brunner Formation (coal measures): Island Formation; sandstone and algal limestone and the Kaiata Formation, mudstone, interpretted as a transgressive sequence. The Cobden formation, unconformably lapping onto the Kaiata Formation is delimited at its base by a breccia, deposited during Whaingaroan basin warping and basement faulting, and at its top by a glauconitic phosphatic richly fossiliferous horizon. The regressive sequence is represented by the Inangahua Formation of graded bedded foraminiferal limestones, sandstones and silts conformably overlain by coal measures in Fletcher Creek. Overlying the coal measures is a thin sequence of fossiliferous marine strata of possibly Waitotaram age, overlain by Old Man Gravels deposited at the beginning of the Kaikoura Orogeny. Calcareous Algae and a Teredenit are described in detail.

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  • The report of the Chinese Immigration Committee, 1871 : with respect to some aspects of public opinion in Otago Province.

    Buckingham, Peter D. (1974)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    88 [2] leaves :illus., maps (1 fold. col. in pocket) ; 26 1/2 cm. Bibliography: p.[89]-[90]

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