24 results for Introduction

  • Introduction

    Barnard, Roger; Burns, Anne (2012)

    Book item
    University of Waikato

    The book aims to fill the gap between conventional research methodology books and published reports of research such as are found in academic journals. While volumes on methodology may explain how and why a particular approach to data collection should be used, they tend not to give specific and detailed examples of the 'messiness' of research - what may go wrong and how to overcome the obstacles that invariably get in the way of a smooth research journey.

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  • Introduction

    Engels-Schwarzpaul, A.-Chr.; Jenner, R.; Refiti, A. (2010-04-22T02:18:03Z)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

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  • Introduction

    Seuffert, Nan; Kukutai, Tahu (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This issue of Law Text Culture has its genesis in a research project on Mobile Peoples Under the Eye of the Law which was originally proposed by Associate Professor Cathy Coleborne at the University of Waikato. The project was supported with a grant for a one day symposium, held in December 2010, from the University of Waikato Contrestable Research Trust Fund, for which we are grateful. As guest editors we invited contributions of postcolonial analyses that investigated mobile peoples, in Australia, New Zealand and the Pacific, both historically and in the present. We were especially interested in the ways in which regulation and surveillance in all of its forms — legal, policy, administrative and so forth — produced and constructed mobile peoples, and how categories of gender and sexuality were shaped in relation to mobile peoples in and through these regimes.

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  • Introduction

    Mitchell, Linda (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This special issue of the Waikato Journal of Education offers three thought provoking examinations of recent research relevant to early childhood education (ECE) policy. These range from a big picture view of the changing nature of New Zealand’s kindergarten provision to a close up of one kindergarten that has collaborated with other agencies to combine parent education and support and early childhood education. Complementing the two New Zealand articles, a third from an Australian research study explores the multiple challenges in working in an integrated way across professional boundaries. These are articles for teachers, managers, and policy analysts who are interested in leading developments for offering a holistic early years curriculum.

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  • Introduction

    Daniel, Roy M.; Finney, John L.; Stoneham, Marshall (2004)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    It is generally taken for granted that water is essential for life. Looking for water on Mars has been a preoccupation for decades, and there are an infinite number of meetings on the general topic of ‘water in biology’. Yet these rarely ask precisely why water is important. And if we cannot answer that question, then perhaps it might be replaced by some other medium in some other life form that can still metabolize and reproduce. In fact, there is recent evidence that the molecular–level requirements for water may have been overstated. Our Discussion Meeting aimed to take a constructively sceptical view, encouraging diversity of attitude by bringing together interested scientists from a range of disciplines.

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  • Introduction

    Robertson, Jan (2006)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This issue of the Journal of Educational Change explores the complexity of leadership and, for and in change in schools. There is a large body of literature which focuses specifically on the influence of principal leadership and school improvement (see review by Hallinger & Heck, 1998) and increasing amounts recently that extend the focus to include governors, teachers, students and communities, as they explore leadership within change processes in schools (for example, Dimmock, 2000; Harris & Lambert, 2003). Professional learning communities and networking of leaders, nationally and internationally, working together to improve student achievement are common themes in the leadership literature today (for example, Stoll, Bolam & Collarbone 2002; Hargreaves, 2003). Distributed leadership is also a regular theme, with research indicating that it is in the ‘‘leadership practice’’ at various levels within a school, where change occurs (Harris, 2005; Spillane, 2006). A common theoretical underpinning in recent literature is that change in schools is a socio-cultural process (Sleegers, Geijsel & van den Berg, 2002; Wells, 1999; Wells & Claxton, 2002) and that it is through the interactions between members of the learning community that the construction of new knowledge takes place (Spillane, 2006). The contributions in this issue of the Journal of Educational Change focus attention on the socio-cultural nature of leadership, change and transformation in schools.

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  • Introduction

    Peters, Sally (2011)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This special edition of Early Years draws on research from Aotearoa New Zealand and comprises six papers that shed light on both the policy context and the curriculum in action. This focus on New Zealand is timely as New Zealand has attracted world-wide attention in recent years for its curricular innovations at both the early childhood (Te Whariki, Ministry of Education 1996) and school level (New Zealand Curriculum, Ministry of Education 2007). There has also been a strong focus on early years research, funded through the current Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) and the Centres of Innovation programme (which ran from 2003– 2009). A vibrant early childhood sector is providing new insights into learning and teaching, whilst also navigating a time of political change with challenges around funding. This introductory paper provides a brief overview of early years education in New Zealand, picking up on and extending some of background information provided by the contributors to this special edition.

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  • Introduction

    Wratten, S.; Sandhu, H.; Cullen, R.; Costanza, R.

    Report
    Lincoln University

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  • Introduction

    Carson, E.; Chase, J.G. (2014)

    Journal Articles
    University of Canterbury Library

    Invited preface and introduction to special edition. This special issue on “Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine” is a collection of related papers selected and extended from those presented at the triennial IFAC Biological and Medical Systems (BMS 2012) Symposium in Budapest, Hungary during August 29-31, 2012.

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  • Introduction

    Buckingham, Louisa (2016-07-18)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Bailey, Lisa; Diggelmann, L; Phillips, Kim (2009)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Davies, Christine (2011-01-25)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Jesson, Jocelyn; Carpenter, Vicki; McLean, Margaret; Stephenson, MS; Airini (2010)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    As a dynamic activity that has significant and far-reaching consequences, university teaching is constantly under review. Ideas about good teaching, its objectives, and the means of achieving those objectives are shifting and contested.

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  • Introduction

    Davies, Stephen (1997)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Wilberg, Hanna; Elliott, M (2015)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book is concerned with pursuing two separate but related central themes that we see in Professor Mike Taggart’s scholarship on substantive grounds of judicial review. The first theme is addressed in part A of the book. It concerns the extent to which review of the merits, traditionally limited to Wednesbury unreasonableness, should be expanded into more intensive reasonableness review, or new substantive grounds of review, or both. In Taggart’s final article on substantive review, entitled ‘Proportionality, Deference, Wednesbury’, the headline point was his surprising and controversial conversion to the ‘bifurcation’ of judicial review into ‘rights cases’ and ‘public wrongs’ cases. However, the article was by no means confined to that point. It was also Taggart’s final contribution on a much wider range of issues concerning substantive grounds of review. A desire to engage with and build on Taggart’s work on this wider range of issues forms the backdrop to and impetus for this collection. The aim, however, is not to revisit already well-trodden ground, but to provide an opportunity for scholars from across the common law world to take forward aspects of the debate concerning substantive judicial review. The second theme is addressed in part B. It concerns the extent to which deference is appropriate on questions of law – a question which Taggart raised most prominently in his essay on ‘The Contribution of Lord Cooke to Scope of Review Doctrine in Administrative Law'. Both themes are concerned with substantive review, but in two different senses of that phrase. The first, in part A, is the narrower sense in which the phrase is most commonly used in the UK, Australia and New Zealand –– relating to judicial examination of the substantive merits of a decision. The second sense in which substantive review is considered in part B is the broader sense in which the phrase is commonly used in Canada –– embracing questions of legality as well as merits questions. The question in relation to this broader sense of substantive review is the opposite of that in part A: not whether such review should be expanded, but whether its intensity should be reduced in some contexts by introducing deference.

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  • Introduction

    Buckingham, Louisa (2017-01-01)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This collection examines the urban multilingual realities of inhabitants of the Arabian Peninsula in the early 21st century from the perspectives of learners, teachers and researchers.

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  • Introduction

    Buck, Ralph; Rowe, Nicholas (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Celebrating the diversity of dance across the South Pacific, this volume studies the various experiences, motivations and aims for dance, emerging from the voices of dance professionals in the islands. In particular, it focuses on the interplay of cultures and pathways of migration as people move across the region discovering new routes and connections.

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  • Introduction

    Greenberg, Robert (2012)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Introduction

    Mackay, Elizabeth (2008)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This provides an introduction to the volume that I edited, setting into appropriate contexts the twelve papers, each of which engages with a different specialist area within Classics

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  • Introduction

    Macrine, S; McLaren, Peter; Hill, D (2009-12-22)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This book brings together a group of top international scholars, who consider Pedagogy of Critique, Revolutionary Pedagogy, and Radical Critical Pedagogy as forms of praxis, to examine the paradoxical roles of schooling in reproducing and ...

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