1,020 results for 1999

  • Nga riwai: Maori potatoes.

    Harris, G. F.; Niha, P. P. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    It is generally accepted by scholars that potatoes were first introduced to New Zealand in the late eighteenth century by Captain James Cook and the French explorer, Marion du Fresne. Further introductions from a variety of sources, including possible direct introductions from South America, followed into the nineteenth century. Maori were quick to recognise the advantages these new introductions had over the kumara (Ipomea batatas) and other traditional food sources. Potatoes soon became both a staple item in the Maori diet and a trade commodity. The various cultivars (cultivated varieties) were given Maori names and many of these early introductions are still grown by Maori today. These 'Maori potatoes' with their deep-set eyes, often knobbly irregular shape and colourful tubers, are quite distinct from modern potatoes and are known as Maori as riwai, taewa, parareka and mahetau.

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  • Tumatanui: The experience of a group of Maori funeral directors: (A bicultural research project).

    Taurima, W.; Cash, M. (1999)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    Kia Ora He Roa rawa te iwi Maori e ratu ana he oranga, e kahore hoki te Maori e whaka takato kaupapa, oranga no reira matika ake to matou ropu me o matou whakaora, ki te tiro tiro me te whakatiki ? tika, me pehea, na tenei kupapa e puta ai e tenei ao huri huri. Ka hikoi matou ke te rapu, ki te pa-tai-tai, me pehea ra I puta ai, te kaha o tenei roopu Maori mo te Maori, I ranga tira ai ratou, ai ratou mahi? A ka titiro matou ki o matou awanga ? wanga ano, kei takakahi matou, I o ratou whakaaro ke pouri ratou. Te ropu nei- he tangata, whaka takoto, tupa-paku. Ka tahu matou ka titiro, he tino rereke, tenei ropu Maori ? he pakari, he matau hoki ki te whaka-puta e tenei kaupapa (kawa). Ka kite matou koia nei te taonga hei whai nga e Matou ? tuatahi. Ki te reo o te iwi Maori, whakaronga. Ka nga taringa me te ngakau kia ronga kia mohio, te iwi e rua nga kaupapa, he titiro tanga ma matou. Tuatahi ko te ture me te kawa o te marae. Ko te marae hoki te kainga hei kohi-kohi e te matauranga o tenei ropu, a me matou hoki te tohunga e whai haere nei. Te kaupapa Maori mo te whanau, hapu ranei. Tuara ? me kohi hoki e nga whaka ? auaki me nga whakapapa ? e ihi nei matou ?Tumatanui? ? mo te whanau e whai mai nei a po-po. Ta matou kaupapa kia mohio ai nga tangata I nga korero ?E ki ana tetahi o nga kai mahi na korero, tino tau-reka-reka tenei kaupapa ? I homai nga I to tatou kai hanga?. Te meanui kia kite ai te ao, ke tei kaha, kia tonu tatou te iwi whenua, ki te rapu ora ? e ngari whaka puaki ? nga mai te tauira ? kia kotahi ai tatou. For many years Maori business has been researched, but in a non-Maori way. Our aim was to correct this: to examine, in a culturally appropriate way, how Maori enterprises survive and thrive in a monocultural business world. Our goal was to find some answers to the question: ?What makes a Maori business Maori? We began our journey by looking at a very specific and culturally sensitive area of business: Maori funeral directors. We recognised that here Maori business people seemed to do business differently. The stories of four families of funeral directors had one striking feature in common ? they were all skilled at ?breaking the oundaries?. This became the title of our first research project. To enable the ?voice? of the Maori enterprises to be eard, we have developed two research tools. The first is a research ?protocol?. This protocol allows knowledge gathering to take place in a way that respects the knowledge of the participants, who are the principal researchers, and is responsible to them and through Maori ?mentors?, to the Maori community. The second tool is a culturally appropriate way of gathering stories. We call this way ?tumatanui? or ?opening up? stories. Our purpose is to allow the stories about what one participant called ?the most callous industry that our heavenly father ever allowed to be created?, to be heard. These stories will challenge the New Zealand business community to look again at the advantages that could be gained by working together in a bicultural way.

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  • Late Miocene paleo-geomorphology of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (Hungary) using physical volcanology data

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    A new view is presented of the Bakony-Balaton Highland Volcanic Field (BBHVF), Hungary, active in late Miocene and built up of ca. 100 mostly alkaline basaltic eruptive centers, scoria cones, tuff rings, maar volcanic complexes and shield volcanoes. A detailed map shows the physical volcanology of the monogenetic volcanic field. In areas where thick Pannonian Sandstone beds build up the pre-volcanic strata normal maar volcanic centers have formed with usually thick late magmatic infill in the maar basins. In areas, where relatively thin Pannonian Sandstone beds resting on thick Mesozoic or Paleozoic fracture-controlled, karsrwater-bearing aquifer, large unusual maar volcanic sequences appear (Tihany type maar volcanoes). In the northern pare of the field large former scoria cones and shield volcanoes give evidence for a smaller impact of the ground and surface water causing phreatomagmatic explosive activity. The Tihany type maar volcanic centers are usually filled by thick maar lake deposits, building up Gilbert type gravelly, scoria rich deltas in the northern side of the maar basins, suggesting a mostly north to south fluvial system in the pre-volcanic surface. Calculating paleosurface elevation for the eruptive centers, two paleo-geomorphology maps are drawn for a younger (4-2.8 Ma) and an older (7.54-4 Ma) scenario. The erosion rate of the volcanic field is estimated to vary between 96 m/Ma and 18 m/Ma. In the western site of BBHVF the erosion rate is higher (more than 60 m/Ma, Tapolca Basin), and an average 50 m/Ma in the center and eastern side.

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  • Large hydrovolcanic field in the Pannonian Basin: general characteristics of the Bakony- Balaton Highland Volcanic Field, Hungary.

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • Subaqueous volcanism and their depositional processes, their relationship to subaerial volcanism: review

    Nemeth, Karoly (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    A vizalatti vulkanizmus jelenségei és üledékképződési folyamatai, kapcsolatai a szárazföldi vulkáni folyamatokkal: attekintes (Subaqueous volcanism and their depositional processes, their relationship to subaerial volcanism: review)

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  • Eroded porous-media aquifer controlled hydrovolcanic centers in the South Lake Balaton Region, Hungary: The Boglár Volcano

    Nemeth, Karoly; Martin, Ulrike; Philippe, Marc (1999-01-01)

    Journal article
    Massey University

    No abstract available

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  • Dairy Deregulation and Low-Input Dairy Production: A Bioeconomic Evaluation

    Tozer, PR; Huffaker, RG (1999-07)


    Massey University

    Deregulation of the Australian dairy industry could affect the utilization of resources by milk producers and the profitability of dairy production. In this study we examine the feed mix that dairy producers use, both pastures and supplements, under partial and total deregulation. We are particularly interested in the interaction of pasture utilization and farm profitability. The results of this research demonstrate that profitable low-input dairying is constrained by the most limiting resource, feed supplied by pasture, and that the interactions between economic and biological processes are critical to farm profitability.

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  • He kupu tuku iho mo tenei reanga : Te ahua o te tuku korero

    Higgins, Rawinia Ruth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    170 leaves ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Māori, Pacific and Indigenous Studies. "March 1999."

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  • Late Quaternary geology of Glenorchy district, Upper Lake Wakatipu

    Kober, Florian (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    vii, 127 leaves :ill., maps ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Geology.

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  • Conservation genetics of island takahe (Porphyrio mantelli)

    Lettink, Marieke (1999)

    Other thesis
    University of Otago

    ii, 66 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm. A research report submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the Diploma in Wildlife Management. University of Otago department: Zoology. University of Otago Wildlife Management Report; no. 96.

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  • Adaptive, evolving, hybrid connectionist systems for image pattern recognition

    Kasabov, Nikola; Israel, Steven; Woodford, Brendon J (1999-05)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    Please note that this is a searchable PDF derived via optical character recognition (OCR) from the original source document. As the OCR process is never 100% perfect, there may be some discrepancies between the document image and the underlying text. Searching and selecting the text of this PDF may also not work in all viewers; for example, they have been found to not work in Apple's Preview application. We therefore recommend Adobe Reader for viewing and searching this PDF.

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  • Finding medical information on the Internet: Who should do it and what should they know

    Parry, David (1999-06)

    Working or discussion paper
    University of Otago

    More and more medical information is appearing on the Internet, but it is not easy to get at the nuggets amongst all the spoil. Bruce McKenzie's editorial in the December 1997 edition of SIM Quarterly dealt very well with the problems of quality, but I would suggest that the problem of accessibility is as much of a challenge. As ever-greater quantities of high quality medical information are published electronically, the need to be able to find it becomes imperative. There are a number of tools to find what you want on the Internet---search engines, agents, indexing and classification schemes and hyperlinks, but their use requires care, skill and experience.

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  • The use of fuzzy tools for small scale decision support systems

    Moyle, Sam A (1999)

    Unclassified
    University of Otago

    This paper discusses the use of fuzzy tools in the realm of Decision Support Systems. I have investigated the possible use of a number of different paradigms against a novel problem - that of correctly classifying the maintenance required on a concrete tiled roof, given certain input values.

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  • New Zealand television : what are the benefits of state ownership of television in a commercial world? : the public service broadcasting debate continues -- : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Social Sciences) in Media Studies at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Wyatt, John (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Faced with the possible sale of our free-to-air state broadcaster Television New Zealand to overseas media interests, this thesis argues a firm case against sale, and sets out to create further public interest and comment. Television is valuable more for its programme content than its ability to raise revenue. Starting with the premise that television has a unique role as a mass communications medium in creating social reality, discussion centres on how ideas of cultural identity, democracy, sovereignty, and national identity are articulated and supported through locally-made, creative and diverse programming; and how this is strengthened in having the state broadcaster take a leading part in setting a high standard in the service provided. The tensions created by economic globalisation of media products are examined, especially in relation to how small nation-states such as New Zealand encounter a deterritorialisation of social identity arising through rapid technological advances and media processes which ignore national state and cultural boundaries. The origin of state television in New Zealand is documented, particular emphasis being given to legislative control, financial performance and the effect that organisational structure has on the content, diversity and standard of programmes scheduled. Maximising the financial performance of TVNZ through saturation advertising is questioned, and the recent polarising debate by politicians, commentators, and the public on the merits or otherwise of state ownership of TVNZ is covered in detail. A comprehensive study of the ABC and SBS in Australia is included, which informs an alternative proposal for TVNZ based on significant restructuring. This thesis concludes TVNZ should be retained in government ownership, but with TV1 guided by a charter which moves its prime function away from commercial imperatives. TV1 should concentrate on developing a broadcasting service dedicated to programmes which contribute a sense of national identity, and which reflect the cultural diversity and aspirations of all New Zealanders. To assist in these goals TV1 would be publicly funded to provide daily primetime ad-free 'windows' used to schedule programmes in line with its charter. TV2, and a range of industry mechanisms, would be used to ameliorate the ratio of tax-payer funding.

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  • Healthful housing : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Sociology at Massey University

    Lynch, Kathleen (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This study researched the housing needs of incipiently homeless low-income households in Auckland. In particular it examined how the compromises and sacrifices low-income households must make to procure housing jeopardises their ability to promote and maintain health. Health within this study was defined holisticly including physical, mental, spiritual and family aspects as well as the dimension of ontological security. The participants were comprised of three groups: housing workers, community health workers, and most importantly the households in housing need. All participants were or had been connected with Monte Cecilia Emergency House. The role of the state, past and present, in assisting low-income households to obtain accommodation was examined. Particular consideration was given to changes which have occurred in the lost-cost rental sector through the move to market-level rents for state housing, and the introduction of a targeted, abatable accommodation allowance. The participants' stories demonstrated an increasing and serious level of unaffordability of rental housing. This had brought about both immediate and long-term detriments to health due to living in over-crowded accommodation and / or a residual post-rent income insufficient to maintain an adequate standard of living. Tangata Whenua and Tagata Pasifika were disproportionately affected by unaffordable housing. The need for a return to income-related state housing was high-lighted. Recommendation was also made regarding the urgent need of a comprehensive survey of housing need, both urban and rural.

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  • The computer as an agent of inclusion : a study of current practice : a thesis submitted as partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education (Special Education), Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Kearney, Alison (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis investigates the nature and extent of computer use for learners with special needs and the context in which they are used. It investigates and documents the practices and beliefs of teachers who believe the computer to be an effective tool for including learners with special needs in regular class settings. The research addresses a number of problems associated with the use of computers in this field. First the lack of critical debate over the use of computers to facilitate the inclusion of learners with special needs in New Zealand schools. Second, while the computer has the potential to overcome many barriers faced by these learners, arguably, this is not always happening and in some cases, the computer can erect other barriers to inclusion. Finally, while it is known what the computer can do for learners with special needs, clarification is still needed on how to do it. The research explores these issues through the perceptions of the teacher who has a vital role to play in the successful use of computers for learners with special needs. The research is designed over two phases. It involves a purposive sample of teachers who have a learner in their class with a Ministry of Education funded computer for reasons of special need. Phase one uses a survey method in which a questionnaire is the vehicle of data collection. Phase one is divided into two parts: (a) the nature and extent of computer use by learners with special needs and the beliefs and practices of the teachers. (b) a comparison of the beliefs and practices of those teachers who believe the computer to be an effective or very effective tool for the inclusion of learners with special needs into regular classes with those teachers who do not believe computers to be effective in this role. Phase two employs a form of ethnographic research where semi structured interviews are used to collect data from six teachers who believe the computer to be an effective tool for inclusion. A analysis of the nature and extent of computer use reveals that most teachers feel confident and competent in implementing computer technology for the learner in their class, and believe that the computer has many advantages. It is less clear however, whether these advantages are being utilised. Most learners were funded through the Ongoing Resourcing Scheme, and the majority had more than 21 teacher-aide hours per week. They used their computers for less than once hour per day and predominantly in the areas of English and Mathematics. Most learners had an IEP, and the computer was written into that plan. The teachers who believed the computer to be an effective tool for including learners with special needs in regular classes identified a number of common beliefs and practices. A belief and commitment to the concept of inclusion, and the importance of integrating the computer into the regular curriculum, (including assessment and the Individual Education Process,) as well as the computer philosophy of the school were significant findings of the research. In sum, the research provides: • an overview of the nature and extent of computer use by learners with special needs, • identifies the beliefs and practices of teachers who belief the computer to be an effective tool for the inclusion of learners with special needs and • highlights ways in which the teacher, the computer and the environment in which it operates might best accommodate the needs of learners with special needs in inclusive ways.

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  • An assessment of the income allocation, living standards, housing and living circumstances of low income households in the Auckland Region in 1998 : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts (Social Sciences) in Social Policy at Massey University

    Nsiah, Johnson Emmanuel (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis addresses one important area of social policy; that is, housing which is broadened to include the income allocation and living standards of low income households in the Auckland region. The study used three focus group discussions with five to seven participants from specific groups of low income households in the cities of Manukau and North Shore to focus ideas and viewpoints. Twelve participants (eight from Manukau City, three from North Shore City and one from Auckland City) took part in interviews, which took between 60 and 90 minutes to complete. These participants represented five single parent and three superannuitant beneficiary households and four low income-working non-beneficiary households who supplemented their low income with supplementary payments from Work and Income New Zealand and Inland Revenue Department. Both the group fora and the interviews were recorded on audiotapes and transcribed. The study used the following measures to ascertain the living standards and quality of life of the 12 households studied: income and expenditure approach, relative deprivation approaches, disadvantage indicators and social exclusion, money problem indicators, housing needs or difficulties and qualitative research approach. It was found that most of the 12 households studied: • had experienced poverty, hardships and a reduction in their standard of living and quality of life as compared to the average New Zealand household. • were not adequately housed because of the difficulties of housing affordability and unacceptable housing maintenance by Housing New Zealand. Whilst the Accommodation Supplement was assisting most of the 12 households studied to pay housing costs, 11 of the 12 households who were State House tenants had great difficulty in paying market rents. • were unable to manage their money problems and had to rely on coping strategies such as the use of foodbanks, food vouchers and second hand goods. The findings of this thesis are a powerful indictment on the Income Support, Market Rent and Accommodation Supplement policies of New Zealand Governments from 1991 to 1998. These policies have clearly abandoned 'participation and belonging' as the underlying principle of social policy.

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  • Employee perceptions of support for family friendly initiatives in the workplace : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    McAulay, Fiona Elizabeth (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The present research investigated the relationships between levels of work-family/family-work conflict, the use of family friendly initiatives, and levels of perceived supervisor, co-worker, and overall organisational support. It has been suggested that the use and effectiveness of family friendly initiatives may be compromised due to unsupportive supervisor attitudes, co-workers, and organisational cultures. Thus, the relative importance of family friendly initiatives and informal workplace supports for the reduction of work-family conflict, and the influence of informal workplace supports on the use of these initiatives were of particular interest. Participants were employees in four medium to large organisations that were members of the Equal Employment Opportunities Trust, Work and Family Network. A questionnaire was developed that included existing scales as well as original items. Overall, 279 male and female employees returned useable questionnaires (a response rate of 37%). No significant relationships were found between the use of family friendly initiatives and work-family or family-work conflict. However, significant relationships were found between levels of work-family conflict and supervisor, co-worker, and overall workplace support. These informal workplace supportive variables were also shown to be more important to the prediction of work-family and family-work conflict, than was the use of family friendly initiatives. Levels of work-family conflict were greater for men than for women, and men's use of family friendly initiatives was significantly related to their perceptions of informal workplace support. No such relationship was found for women. The research demonstrated that informal workplace support was more important to the reduction of work-family and family-work conflict than the number of initiatives used. The importance of work-family conflict to men was highlighted, demonstrating the relevance of family friendly initiatives for both genders. The attitudes and expectations in the workplace that limit the use of initiatives, particularly by men, need to be changed. When introducing a family friendly programme, the needs of employees, the quality of the initiatives, the attitudes of supervisors and co-workers, and the expectations and structure of work within the organisation, must all be addressed to ensure that employees feel able to make use of the family friendly initiatives available.

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  • Changing work values? : a study of New Zealand employees in Japanese-owned subsidiaries : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Studies in Management at Massey University

    Evans, Paul N (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Culture influences the way in which people work, therefore one's work values are influenced by national culture. An increase in globalisation has occurred, resulting in organisations having to adapt to cultural diversity within and between organisations, countries, and cultures. Japan adopted various production systems developed in the United States to rebuild their economy after World War II. Japan has since become an economic superpower, establishing operations in other countries, and transferring the same successful systems and techniques into other cultures. This research illustrates the influence of Japanese production systems and management techniques on the work values of New Zealand employees in two Japanese-owned subsidiaries. The findings indicate that while Japanese production systems and management techniques have been implemented within two participating subsidiaries, the influence of these systems tends to reinforce traditional work values rather than change them.

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  • Deconstructing narrative therapy in practice : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Nicholl, Patricia Marie (1999)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Narrative therapists have made claims as to how a narrative interview or series of interviews should be best structured. This thesis shows, through the analysis of a narrative interview, that these claims represent the practice of narrative therapy. However, several processes that narrative therapists have not explicitly noted as being critical for the successful attainment of the goals of this approach, have emerged as being of fundamental importance. These are the use of positioning, metaphor, indirectness and scaffolding. Their importance lies in that they facilitate an alliance between therapist and client and also minimise the possibility of opposition to the therapeutic process. In addition, they maximise the potential for the development and acceptance of alternative conceptualisations of the self and reality. Furthermore, they actively engage the person in the co-construction of meaning. This increases the likelihood that the newly constructed narrative will be conceptualised as reflecting reality, and as a consequence of this, that it will be acted on as such.

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