1,043 results for 2002

  • Learning statistics at a distance.

    Curry, L. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    There is evidence from many leading statistics educators that students often find statistics a difficult subject to learn. This is often attributed to the abstract nature of the concepts and, in particular, to the change in thinking required to understand the theory of probability and its application in statistics. For mature-aged students, these difficulties may be compounded by lack of basic mathematical skills and anxiety about learning statistics. In addition, learning at a distance may increase the problems students have in obtaining good understanding of the concepts. In this paper the current literature relating to learning statistics is discussed, and some findings are presented from a qualitative study that aimed to record the feelings, opinions and experiences of a group of mature-aged students studying statistics in a distance environment. These findings are then discussed with reference to an existing framework described by Belenky, Clinchy, Goldberger and Tarule (1986) for understanding the way women come to know. The main findings of the study were the following: (1) Their lack of mathematical skills was the main reason that students were tentative about tackling a statistics course. Older students and those with little secondary education may have been particularly affected, (2) Anxiety was not so extensive as had been reported in overseas studies but is still an issue for statistics educators, (3) Almost all students saw value in having a compulsory statistics course in their degree and were aware of the need to interpret data presented to them in their study, work or everyday life, (4) The mature-aged students demonstrated good metacognitive skills and other learning strategies. Determination to succeed and high motivation were apparent, although many students found the course unexpectedly difficult, and (5) There was a variety of opinions about the effectiveness of available resources. Support mechanisms were deemed important, as was a face-to-face component in the statistics course and some flexibility in time frames.

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  • Ask them! Children's fiction book choices and the implications for libraries

    Irvine, J. (2002)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Roles, expectations and pedagogical awareness: Cultural influences in Chinese university classrooms.

    Li, M. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper, based on a study carried out by the author, reviews the disparities in role assumptions and expectations that underlie the classroom communication between Chinese learners and expatriate teachers in China. The central issue, the paper argues, is the miscommunication of teacher-student role conceptualisations and expectations. Differing role assumptions pre-date teachers' teaching methods and students' conceptions of learning. Expatriate teachers with little knowledge of the Chinese cultural and educational contexts have difficulty in interpreting their roles as teachers and fulfilling the expectations these roles entail, and therefore have difficulty in finding a 'fit' in their teaching. It is argued that pedagogy is context-dependent. Teaching methods that are recognised as successful in the country where they originate cannot achieve similar results when applied to a culturally different classroom setting that sets different social and psychological dimensions around the teacher-student relationship. It is suggested that expatriate teachers need to develop a repertoire of professional teaching communication skills, especially in language, pedagogies and culture, to enable them to (1) understand their roles as teachers in a cross-cultural setting, (2) examine their cultural values, beliefs and role concepts, (3) adapt their teaching to the needs of the students, (4) establish a cultural synergy, and (5) find a pedagogical fit in intercultural classroom communication.

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  • Recognition of prior learning in New Zealand: What has been, what is, and what might be.

    Hornblow, D. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper traces the history of Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) in New Zealand from the beginning of the 1990s to the present day. It draws upon a case study from the early years, a wide range of the literature, advice from experts in the field, and personal experience of the author in presenting at conferences, both nationally and internationally, and in facilitating candidates through RPL processes. In terms of what has been and what is, benchmarks of inspiration, frustration and celebration are indicated. Looking to the future, it suggests that RPL policy and principles rest easily within the concepts of flexible assessment and open learning. To help put strategies for recognising prior learning in place, a convenient way of categorising tertiary educational institutions in terms of both their accessibility to learners for RPL and their related economic viability is presented. 'Lo-Lo' (that is, low in accessibility and low in economic viability, respectively), 'Hi-Lo', 'Lo-Hi' and 'Hi-Hi' organisations are identified and described. Overall, the author proposes a 'Flexible Assessment Model' involving partnerships among learners, education and training providers, industry, unions and government. This model, from the perspective of education providers, incorporates a cyclical process of: (1) pre-entry counselling, (2) referrals between institutions as appropriate, (3) learner profiling, (4) negotiation of learning and assessment options, (5) assessment, (6) granting of credit, and (7) consideration of new learning opportunities.

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  • Black Swan Records - 1921-1924: From a swanky swan to a dead duck.

    Davis, D.; De Loo, I. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    In 1921, Harry Herbert Pace founded a highly influential record company, the Pace Phonograph Corporation, in Harlem, New York. Pace both initiated and operated the famous Black Swan label, which was one of the first to enable black musicians to record music in their own style. Many famous black artists, such as Ethel Waters, Fletcher Henderson, the Harmony Five and Alberta Hunter made their early appearances on the Black Swan label. In its heyday of 1921-1922, the company was the most successful Afro-American owned business of its time. Several factors that led to the company's demise after its initial success and rapid growth can be identified. In addition to economic and technological factors, it is likely that poor management accounting, underestimation of overheads, under capitalization and 'ad hoc' decision making all led to financial distress. Racial prejudice and discrimination also played a crucial role. By today's standards, the company's fall in 1924 would have been easily foreseen, but in the business climate of the 1920s, better management may have been no more successful in keeping the company afloat. Nevertheless, today's recording industry, particularly in the field of jazz, owes much to the pioneering work of Harry Pace and the Black Swan label.

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  • Quantum physics and human consciousness: The status of the current debate.

    Jackson, P. (2002)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

    This paper reviews the literature on the debate about the relationship between the quantum realm and human consciousness. It starts with a brief look at quantum physics, then moves on to look at the key quantum interpretations, covering the Copenhagen Interpretation, Von Neumann's views, the neorealists, and the 'many worlds' and 'many minds' views. Key authors in the literature on the quantum-consciousness debate are then reviewed within a framework of three levels of explanation: neurological, psychological and philosophical. The various analyses are brought together by consideration of the key issues that arose during the review, where these were seen as the quantum-neuron interaction, neurons and consciousness, consciousness and the wave equation, Copenhagen versus the rest, 'many worlds' versus 'many minds', the Cartesian dichotomy, and Chalmers' hard problem. Finally, the paper finds the 'many minds' view the most viable of the views examined.

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  • Tumatanui: The experience of the first indigenous wine company to export high quality wine from New Zealand: (A bicultural research project).

    Taurima, W.; Cash, M. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    This research provides a case study of the first ever Maori export wine company. This significant point of difference is just one reason Tohu has been able to make its mark overseas. Tohu has always been aware that Maori branding would factor significantly in its appeal to overseas buyers. Our research philosophy ?Breaking Boundaries? involves an appreciative inquiry into Maori organisations that break boundaries while operating in a culturally deficient business environment. Producing quality wines is Tohu?s main objective. The driving philosophy behind the company is also important and comes second on Tohu?s list of objectives. The land?s sacredness to Maori and the wisdom and values of the old people are central to Tohu?s branding. These qualities continue into the company?s business culture today. We are looking in an appreciative way at this industry from within, giving what we called ?Tumatanui?, the inside view of Tohu Wines. We are looking for the spirit of the place, the things that make a difference and that are successful. For this we are eternally grateful to our knowledge-carriers who came forth with their stories which you will find enlightening. We are also grateful for their support and dedication to the wine industry and its great export potential. E rua tau ruru, rua tau wehe, E rua tau mutu, E rua Tau kai. Two years of wind and storm, Two years when food is scarce, Two years when crops fail, Two years of abundant food. After long waiting, prosperity comes at last.

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  • Real time operating systems in a high-level language C/C++: Pitfalls and possibilities.

    McCall, Tony (2002)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

    The process of designing a Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS) can be fraught with difficulty. This research sets out to test the validity of using a high level language such as the Borland C/C++ programming language to write the RTOS Kernel and the tasks that will run with that operating system. This inductive study examines some of the major RTOS components and seeks to demonstrate how they can be coded into the C/C++ language. During that process, the problems encountered, and possible solutions, are documented. This enquiry was based on the 80x86 range of processors due to their popularity in large-scale embedded control applications.

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  • Environmental review report of The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand 2002.

    Gehrke, T.; Harms, S. (2002)

    Working Papers
    Open Polytechnic

    The main objective of this environmental report is to benchmark the current position in order to devise quantitative and qualitative measures to reduce environmental impacts at The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand and to support the implementation of its environmental policy and The Natural Step framework. In this report the environmental performance at The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand is investigated at the Waiwhetu Campus, with separate analyses provided for the Print Shop and the Cafeteria. Analysis of the Business Centres in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch is outside the scope of this report. Areas of environmental impact investigated are paper use, electricity and natural gas consumption, water use, waste generation, emissions, recycling activities and cleaning. Recommendations are made throughout the report with the aim of reducing adverse environmental impacts. In addition to actions geared specifically to each area of environmental performance, general aspects considered are: (1) the improvement of monitoring and reporting of the environmental impacts on campus, (2) education of staff, particularly about implementation of The Natural Step framework, (3) analysis of campus-wide opportunities to save energy, and (4) introduction of a policy that considers the environmental performance of contractors to The Open Polytechnic of New Zealand. The report shows that improved environmental management would benefit the financial, as well as the environmental, bottom line.

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  • A study on salinity instrusion: Case of the Waiwhetu aquifer, Wellington, New Zealand.

    De Costa, G. S.; Jones, A. (2002)

    Working or discussion paper
    Open Polytechnic

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  • Disability discourses for online identities.

    Bowker, N.; Tuffin, K. (2002)

    Journal article
    Open Polytechnic

    Beneficial effects of the online medium have been reported for disabled people in terms of providing a 'levelling ground' where they can be treated on their merits as a person, rather than as a disabled person. If this occurs because impairment is invisible online, how then are disabled people managing disability disclosure within this social context? This paper addresses this issue discursively. Participants were recruited from various disability organisations in New Zealand and were invited to take part in an online interview. A 'choice to disclose' repertoire was identified and was organised around three key resources: relevance, anonymity and normality. Embedded within each resource is the idea that the presence or absence of impairment is constructed as a feature controlled by the individual. Positioning identity within a subjectivity removed from impairment was made possible through these resources and was valued by participants. Political implications associated with the absence of impairment are discussed.

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  • Making the transition - Year 13 computer studies at Burnside High School: a case study

    McCarthy, C. (2002)

    Conference paper
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    This paper describes a process that provides a transition programme for senior high school students towards tertiary study in a vocational institution in preparation for a career in information and communications technology. The paper examines the case study of the introduction of this pilot project and follows the experiences of a cohort of students.

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  • Experimenting with web-based course management applications - as a tool for sharing research information and promoting research

    Asgarkhani, M.; Weir, D. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    During the past few years, there has been a major shift in the New Zealand tertiary education marketplace - more specifically, with Polytechnics offering degree programs alongside other qualifications that they have been making readily available. It is now necessary for them to be able to demonstrate that they are capable of conducting research - more specifically, in providing support, making resources and funding available and promoting a research-orientated culture. Polytechnics across New Zealand have applied various tools and techniques in order to promote and encourage research. This paper outlines the results of an experiment with Blackboard (a Web-based course management tool) as a tool for promoting research and scholarly activities.

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  • Management for success in eCommerce

    Nesbit, T. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The purpose of this paper is to further explore the management skills that are needed in eCommerce organisations. Nesbit (2001a, 2001b) began an exploration that was largely based on the work of Davis and Hajnal (1998) who had identified a number of management skills that are perceived as being important. The main aim of this paper is to identify which skills are perceived as being the most important in a wider range of organisations. This was achieved by conducting a survey of eCommerce organisations in New Zealand, with the aim of answering the following research question: “What are the management skills that a sample of eCommerce organisations perceive to the most critical to success?” The results of this research point to the most important skills and competencies being of a strategic nature. The analysis showed that, for the sample of covered by the questionnaire, a group of skills and competencies of a strategic nature are significantly more important than a group of skills and competencies that are of a technical and operational nature.

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  • Computer modelling and simulation as a learning tool: a preliminary study of network simulation products

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, computer simulation plays a significant role in the process of decisionmaking and planning. Furthermore, it can act as an effective tool for learning, teaching and training. Educating and training learners in the field of communications and Web enabling technologies can be a costly exercise – as theory often needs to be supported by handson practice in workshops or labs. In this case, computer simulation products can often prove to be an alternative cost-effective solution. This paper introduces a methodology for evaluating such products and discusses the results of a preliminary study of a number of options that are currently available within the marketplace.

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  • Student workplace contracts: the tie that binds

    Wieck, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    The establishment of a formal contract between student and employer is becoming a requirement for tertiary institutions that feature cooperative education courses. Such courses require students to complete a piece of work that would typically be completed by a recent graduate of the respective course. Employers get an opportunity to see what a potential employee can do, while the institution receives confirmation that, at least, their teachings can be related to productive tasks. In turn, students need protection from exploitation or physical accidents they might suffer while in the workplace. This paper reviews a selection of current and past student-employer contracts used for cooperative education (work placement) courses and by consulting employers, students and representatives of this and other tertiary institutions, explores the implications for their use. It concludes with recommendations for items to incorporate in an effective contract. A more quantitative treatment, including a more extensive survey, is planned for later in the year.

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  • E-learning: Current trends, practices and issues for future consideration

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    As public interest in the Internet continues to grow, there is an increasing pressure on educators to incorporate Internet resources into traditional classroom programs in new and creative ways. Some institutions have introduced Web-assisted options as a supplement to face-to-face communication between students and educators/trainers, whilst others offer Web-based learning with the Internet as the sole medium for delivery. To date, there has been some debate with regards to the perceived effectiveness of these Web-assisted options (from the point of view of both teaching staff and students). This paper presents the results of a preliminary study of the students’ attitudes towards webassisted learning (within the Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology - CPIT).

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  • Virtual machine technologies and their application in the delivery of ICT

    McEwan, W. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Virtual Machine (VM) technology was first implemented and developed by IBM corporation in the early 1960's as a mechanism for providing multi-user facilities in a secure mainframe computing environment. In recent years the power of personal computers has resulted in renewed interest in the technology. This paper begins by describing the development of VM. It discusses the different approaches by which a VM can be implemented, and it briefly considers the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. VM technology has proven to be extremely useful in facilitating the teaching of multiple operating systems. It offers an alternative to the traditional approaches of using complex combinations of specially prepared and configured OS images installed via the network or installed permanently on multiple partitions or on multiple physical hard drives. VM technology has proven equally useful in the practical teaching of data communications, where complex internets have to be regularly constructed and reconfigured in order to study the underlying communication protocols (e.g. TCP/IP). It is also of immense use as a platform for research into these somewhat related areas - a virtual machine or network of virtual machines can be specially configured, allowing an ordinary user supervisor rights, and it can be tested to destruction without any adverse effect on the underlying host system. This paper hopes to also illustrate how VM configurations can greatly reduce our dependency on special purpose, complex, and expensive laboratory setups. It also suggests the important additional role that VM and VNL is likely to play in offering hands-on practical experience to students in a distance elearning environment.

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  • Computer modelling and simulation as a learning tool - A preliminary study of network simulation products

    Asgarkhani, M. (2002)

    Conference item
    Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology, Te Wānanga Ōtautahi

    Today, computer simulation plays a significant role in the process of decisionmaking and planning. Furthermore, it can act as an effective tool for learning, teaching and training. Educating and training learners in the field of communications and Web enabling technologies can be a costly exercise – as theory often needs to be supported by handson practice in workshops or labs. In this case, computer simulation products can often prove to be an alternative cost-effective solution. This paper introduces a methodology for evaluating such products and discusses the results of a preliminary study of a number of options that are currently available within the marketplace.

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  • Accommodating multiculturalism and biculturalism in Aotearoa New Zealand: Implications for language education

    May, Stephen (2002-01-01)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The field of language education in Aotearoa New Zealand, as elsewhere, has developed significantly since its early and almost exclusive focus on the acquisition of English literacy in schools. As the field has expanded, so too has the range of language education sectors addressed and the theoretical approaches and understandings employed in relation to language and literacy education. Both developments have resulted in a more coordinated literacy education policy - exemplified to date most clearly in the New Zealand Literacy Taskforce - and a more situated, less monolithic understanding of the widely different literacies available to learners. Despite these developments, however, one area still remains noticeably under-theorised and marginalized in relation to ongoing development of language and literacy education policy in Aotearoa - the place of second language learners within it. This paper explores this lacuna and the potential policy implications of addressing and integrating first and second language educational concerns within an evolving national literacy education policy. This has particular implications for the further development of bilingual education - both for Maori and, possibly, other minority groups - and for the related possibilities for multicultural education. It also requires a wider and clearer recognition of minority language education rights, as developed within both international law and political theory, in order to apply these rights appropriately to an Aotearoa New Zealand context which is currently witnessing rapid and extensive demographic (and linguistic) change.

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