75 results

  • She???s Always a Woman: Butch Lesbian Trans Women in the Lesbian Community

    Rossiter, Hannah (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    While the visibility and acceptance of trans women have grown globally in recent years, this progress has primarily been within a traditional, heteronormative narrative. But a growing number of trans women identify as butch lesbians and challenge this heteronormative narrative. The existence of butch trans women has created a debate on where they fit within queer and lesbian communities and how their gender performance fits within traditional butch/femme understandings of lesbian or queer relationships. This article seeks to explore the intersections of gender identity and sexual orientation that butch trans women experience when they engage with lesbian and trans communities.

    View record details
  • Lesbian pornography--a new view of women's sexuality

    Lazar, Marguerita Isabel (1997)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    ix, 203 leaves :ill. ; 30 cm. Includes bibliographical references. University of Otago department: Education. "22 December 1997."

    View record details
  • Heteronormativity at work: stories from two lesbian academics

    Giddings, LS; Pringle, JK (2012-02-24)

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Since the 1980s, in spite of societal shifts and legislation that supports women of diverse sexual identities, heterosexual norms still prevail in many workplaces. In this paper we apply Acker’s (2006a) ‘inequality regime’ as a potential framework to unravel heteronormative practices. We use snippets from our lesbian herstories to illustrate how heteronormativity has affected our lives as women in academe. Through this paper we alert lesbian colleagues to our proposed research project on heteronormativity in academic workplaces and ask that they consider participating in this research.

    View record details
  • Ten lesbian students reflect on their secondary school experiences.

    Quinlivan, Kathleen Anne (1994)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis comprises part of a parallel study currently being undertaken with a gay male researcher. It investigates the secondary school experiences of lesbian and gay youth and the ways in which these experiences affected young lesbians coming to terms with their emerging lesbian identities. Using qualitative research methodology, two semi-structured interviews were conducted across two urban sites with ten young lesbian women between the ages of fourteen and twenty-five. Various feminist theories and contemporary adolescent developmental theories were drawn on to provide a context within which the participants' experiences could be situated. The research revealed that with one notable exception. Secondary schools do little to support young women who do not conform to the heterosexual norm. As a result the participants felt marginalised and excluded both within the school curriculum and from their peers and teachers. Many felt compelled to suppress their sexual identity. The strategies that they used to do this and their negative effects are then described. Finally I draw upon previous studies and the participants' suggestions to suggest ways in which schools could change to meet the needs of lesbian students more fully.

    View record details
  • Lesbian mothers: queer families: the experience of planned pregnancy

    Bree, Caroline (2003-01-01)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Lesbian-identified women are choosing to become parents in increasing numbers. This 'lesbian baby boom' has implications for midwives and their practice. The purpose of this study was to gain insight and understanding of planned pregnancy from a lesbian perspective, in order to facilitate the provision of appropriate care for lesbian mothers and their families.The methodology used for the study was radical hermeneutics informed by lesbian feminism and queer poststructuralism. Purposive sampling identified ten lesbian-identified mothers and conversational interviews with the participants yielded rich data about the phenomenon of inquiry. Thematic analysis of the data was foregrounded by a discussion of the socio-political context.A number of findings emerged from the study. Careful pre-conceptual planning reflected a highly responsible approach to parenting. The women's partners felt uncertain about their parenting role and experienced a lack of acknowledgement by the wider community. Despite legal access to assisted fertility, the participants usually sought an involved father for their child. Lesbian mothers expressed a preference for a lesbian midwife and all experienced homophobic attitudes from healthcare professionals. Queer families included mothers and their partners, fathers and their partners, children, families-of-origin, and close friends.Recommendations from the study include the provision of safe and supportive workplaces for lesbian-identified midwives, the use of inclusive language such as partner and parent, acknowledgement of the woman's partner as a co-parent, midwifery resources featuring same-sex parents and midwifery education covering diverse family forms.

    View record details
  • Gay and lesbian adoptive parenting: a review of literature

    Mousa, M.; McAlonan, V.; Scherman, R (2014-02-14)

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • On our best behaviour: Lesbian-parented families in early childhood education

    Lee, Debora; Duncan, J (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Lesbian parents live in a world that often assumes that all families consist of a mum, dad, and the kids. This can complicate their families, participation in early childhood education. Through interviews with gay mothers, this article draws out the tensions underlying their experiences at early childhood centres. These mothers negotiate between achieving visibility and acceptance, and avoiding negative reactions for their children.

    View record details
  • De-or re-pathologising homosexuality? Newspaper constructions of gay men and lesbians in Aotearoa/New Zealand,

    Busch, R.; Beaumont, G. (2005)

    Conference paper
    Open Polytechnic

    View record details
  • Lesbian, gay and bisexual clients’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy

    Tsai, Sandy (2014-05-19)

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The current study explores lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) individuals’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy. Current literature indicate that the absence of sexual identity issues being identified and discussed could be a significant barrier to effective therapy with LGB clients. However, little research has explored how sexual identity is conceptualized in therapy by LGB clients and their therapists, and how this influences their therapeutic outcomes. Using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA), LGB clients’ experiences of discussing sexual identity in therapy was investigated. Results clustered into three overarching themes: 1. Sexual identity as self in the making; 2. Sexual identity as a barrier; and 3. Sexual identity as increased awareness of oppression. Discussion of sexual identity is important for LGB clients in therapy, regardless of whether it is the main focus of their presenting issues. These discussions help them explore their sexual identity formation processes, which result in a stronger sense of identity due to a better understanding of sexual identity as an aspect of themselves. LGB clients who lack such opportunities to discuss sexual identity in therapy experience heteronormative assumptions and biases from their therapists, which increased their awareness of themselves as individuals of sexual minority and empathy towards others under oppression. The current study concludes that therapists should remain open-minded and explorative when helping LGB clients discuss their sexual identities in therapy, but always in context to their presenting issues so that conceptualizations and sense-making of sexual identity is centred in the clients’ subjective experiences

    View record details
  • Staying in, tuning in, and coming out: Music as imagined space in lesbians’ coming out geographies

    Hardie, Lisa Caroline (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    This thesis examines the mutually constitutive relationship between lesbians, music, place and space. It is argued that music creates safe spaces for a small group of lesbians during their coming out process. Feminist, post-structuralist and queer theories and methodologies provide the framework for this research. In particular Foucault’s concept ‘heterotopia’ is utilised to argue that music can subvert hegemonic sexualised spaces and create temporary utopic imagined spaces for lesbians. Based on a series of semi-structured interviews and music elicitation with ten lesbians (aged between 27 and 34) in the United Kingdom and New Zealand, the findings show how imagined spaces created by music play a significant role in the performance of lesbian sexual identities, coming out, and feelings of belonging. Three themes frame my analysis of lesbian music heterotopias. First, I argue that music can create safe spaces for lesbians who experience feelings of shame, fear, and embarrassment. Acting as a type of mobile and symbolic ‘closet’, music may shield young lesbians from homophobic attitudes and reactions. Second, music may be understood as intimate space in which same-sex longing, loving and heartache can be explored and expressed. Music becomes a technology of memory whereby the listener creates a heterotopia of time to reminisce past same-sex desires and heartache. Third, I consider the way in which music can be understood as connecting space. Places such as bars and concerts are transformed by music and become places in which lesbians may connect and socialise. Feelings of isolation dissolve when connections are made in both imagined and real spaces of music. These findings illustrate that both the private and public lesbian geographies of music helps create communities of belonging. This thesis responds to the lack of attention paid to lesbians’ coming out geographies and demonstrates the power of music in subverting the sexual hegemony of everyday imagined and real spaces. Considering lesbians’ coming out music heterotopias may encourage a more critical understanding of power, sexualities, music, space and place.

    View record details
  • Lady-Husbands and Kamp Ladies: Pre-1970 Lesbian Life in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Laurie, Alison J (2003)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study explores pre-1970 lesbian life and lives in Aotearoa/New Zealand before the impact of women's and gay liberation and lesbian-feminism, using written sources and oral histories. The thesis argues that before 1970 most women could make lesbianism the organising principle of their lives only through the strategies of discretion and silence. Despite apparent censorship, many classical, religious, legal, medical and fictional discourses on lesbianism informed New Zealand opinion, as regulation of this material was one thing, but enforcement another, and most English language material was available here. These discourses functioned as cautionary tales, warning women of the consequences of disclosure, while at the same time alerting them to lesbian possibilities. Though lesbian sexual acts were not criminalised in New Zealand, lesbianism was contained, regulated and controlled through a variety of mechanisms including the fear of forced medical treatment, social exclusion and disgrace, as well as the loss of employment, housing and family relationships. Class and race affected these outcomes, and this study concludes that learning how to read a wide variety of lesbian lives is essential to furthering research into lesbian histories in New Zealand. The study examined pre-1970 published and unpublished writing suggesting lesbian experiences by selected New Zealand women, within a context informed by writing from contemporaries who have been identified as lesbian, and oral histories from pre-1970 self-identified lesbians.. Many of these women led secretive, often double lives, and of necessity deceived others through silence and omission, actual denial, or sham heterosexual marriages and engagements. The lies, secrecy and silence of self-censorship has often meant the deliberate destruction of written records such as letters or diaries, by women themselves, or later by family members and friends. The study concludes that the private lesbianism of most pre-1970 lesbian lives cannot be understood in isolation, and that scholars must move beyond the women's necessary masquerades to place their lives into a lesbian context in order to recognize and understand them. Each life informs an understanding of the others and by considering them together the study provides a picture of lesbianism in pre-1970 New Zealand, with the stories of the narrators illuminating the written experiences. Silences should not be mistaken for absences, or heterosexuality assumed for all pre-1970 New Zealand women. The stories of resistance and rebellion told by the self-identified lesbian narrators indicate that the women whose lesbian experiences are suggested by their writings similarly resisted societal expectations and prescriptions. Learning how to interpret and understand these materials is essential for moving beyond superficial and heterosexualised accounts of their lives. Towards the end of the period, influenced by other social changes, some lesbians in this study began to resist the need for caution and discretion, providing the basis for the liberation movements of the 1970s.

    View record details
  • Convenient Fictions: The Script of Lesbian Desire in the Post-Ellen Era: A New Zealand Perspective

    Hopkins, ALison Julie (2009)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Little has been published about the ascending trajectory of lesbian characters in prime-time television texts. Rarer still are analyses of lesbian fictions on New Zealand television. This study offers a robust and critical interrogation of Sapphic expression found in the New Zealand television landscape. More specifically, this thesis analyses fictional lesbian representation found in New Zealand's prime-time, free-to-air television environment. It argues that television's script of lesbian desire is more about illusion than inclusion, and that lesbian representation is a misnomer, both qualitatively and quantitively. In order to assess the authenticity of television's lesbian fictions, I sampled the opinions of New Zealand's television audience through focus group and survey methodology, and analysed two primary sources of lesbian representation available between 2004-2006. Television and other media provide the social and cultural background - the milieu - against or within which their fictions, dramas and comedies are set. Even when media texts are clearly non- or anti realistic (fantasy films, for instance), they usually attempt to produce their narratives as consistent, familiar and in keeping with the cultural characteristics, values and proclivities of mainstream contemporary society. This is not realism so much as a set of arbitrary conventions that are read as, or stand for, reality and the real. In short, the media is a teller of stories and fairy tales; and since mainstream Western culture has naturalised homonormativity, television's fairy tales are almost exclusively tales of heterosexuality. Television, from this perspective, reinscribes and reinforces what Pierre Bourdieu refers to as the 'masculine order'. Television uses reality to frame messages of compulsory heterosexuality, and it rarely presents homonormative messages. Lesbian representation is, therefore, difficult for a heteronormative medium to render without effort. Homonormativity is, for lesbian audiences, a central part of the cultural background - the components of realism, if you like, within which representations of lesbians would 'play out' their stories in media texts. Television stories which ignore this imperative deny both the audience's ability to interpret for themselves the integrity of the representation, and their ability to acquire new knowledge of lesbians.

    View record details
  • Personal and Professional Choices, Tensions, and Boundaries in the Lives of Lesbian Psychiatric Mental Health Nurses

    Walsh, Christine Mary Miriam (2007)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This study breaks new ground in articulating how sexual identity impacts on the therapeutic relationship between the client and the lesbian nurse in psychiatric mental health nursing. There is little consideration given in the literature or in research as to how sexuality of the nurse impacts on nursing practice. Most attitudes held by the public and nursing staff are based on the assumption that everyone is heterosexual, including nurses. Fifteen lesbian psychiatric mental health nurses from throughout New Zealand volunteered for two interviews and shared their experiences of becoming and being a lesbian psychiatric mental health nurse. The stories they told give new insights into how these nurses negotiate and position their lesbian identity in the therapeutic relationship. To work therapeutically with people in mental distress the nurse uses personal information about themselves to gain rapport with the client through appropriate selfdisclosure. Being real, honest and authentic are also key concepts in this relationship so the negotiation of reveal/conceal of the nurse’s identity is central to ongoing therapeutic engagement. One of the most significant things arising from the research is that participants areable to maintain their honesty and authenticity in the therapeutic relationship whether they self-disclose their lesbian identity or not. This is because the experiences in their personal lives have influenced how the participants ‘know themselves’ and therefore guide how they ‘use self’ in their therapeutic nursing. The concept of a ‘licensed narrative’ has also been developed during this research reflecting the negotiated understandings between the researcher and the participants. Further, the use of NVivo a qualitative software package helps to track and make transparent the research processes. These two aspects make a unique contribution to the field of narrative inquiry.

    View record details
  • Perceptions towards lesbian, gay and bisexual people in residential care facilities: A qualitative study

    Neville, SJ; Adams, J; Bellamy, Gary; Boyd, Michal; George, N (2015-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Internationally, increases in the numbers of older people will be reflected in larger numbers of more socioculturally diverse groups of older people requiring care provided by residential care facilities. Covert and overt instances of homophobia are evident within residential care services provided to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Aims: To explore the perceptions of care staff working in residential care homes towards older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Design: Critical gerontology formed the methodological foundations for focus group discussions with care staff from seven residential care facilities. Hypothetical vignettes were used to stimulate discussion amongst participants. Results: Thematic analysis of the seven focus group interviews illuminated three themes: ???Knowing me knowing you???, ???Out of sight out of mind??? and ???It's a generational thing???. Subtle as well as not so subtle forms of homophobia were evident in each of the themes. Care staff felt they were largely unprepared to provide care to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people. Conclusion: This small-scale New Zealand study identifies that the residential care sector is not always supportive, or prepared, to provide a care service to those people identifying as lesbian, gay and bisexual. Implications for practice: Findings from this study recommend the implementation of principle-based guidelines, opportunities to participate in ongoing education and partnering with non-heterosexual community organisations in order to provide culturally appropriate care to older lesbian, gay and bisexual people.

    View record details
  • Maternity Risk and the Lesbian Pay Gap: Evidence from the U.S. Decennial Census and American Community Survey

    Skilling, Hayden (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Prior research from the U.S. and abroad reveals a sizable lesbian earnings advantage over otherwise-similar heterosexual women. Using data from the 2000 U.S. Census and 2005-2010 American Community Surveys, we estimate traditional earnings equations and find robust evidence of a lesbian premium, corroborating the findings of previous studies. Using within-sample maternity incidence as an estimate of employers' forward-looking expectations, we then examine whether differences in the perceived likelihood of an employee requiring maternity leave, here-labelled 'maternity risk', contribute to the lesbian pay gap. Results from a direct assessment suggest that maternity risk adversely affects income, and that accounting for near-term differences in maternity risk reduces the lesbian premium by approximately ten to fifteen percent. Further analyses, using proxy variables for differential maternity risk, yield similar results. As such, the persistent finding of a lesbian earnings advantage in previous studies can be attributed, at least in part, to employers' aversion to maternity risk and its associated costs. These findings are also of critical importance to the general labour-market discrimination literature. Given the adverse earnings effect of maternity risk, our analysis suggests that estimates of the well-established gender earnings disparity are likely to be considerably smaller when incorporating maternity risk into the analysis. Absent the ability to adequately control for maternity risk, strict attention should be paid to potential upward bias in estimated earnings differentials. Moreover, policymakers should consider the broader implications of maternity-leave policy on the labour-market outcomes of females. In this respect, maternity-leave policy may influence the hiring and promotion decisions of employers, thereby indirectly affecting sexual-orientation and gender equality in the labour market. However, further research in this area is still required, given the limitations inherent in the direct and indirect analyses.

    View record details
  • Exploring the Impact of Sexual Orientation on Experiences and Concerns about End of Life Care and on Bereavement for Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual Older People

    Almack, K; Seymour, J; Bellamy, Gary (2010-10-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This article explores how sexual orientation1 may impact on concerns about, and experiences of, end of life care and bereavement within same-sex relationships. We draw on exploratory data from four focus groups with lesbian and gay elders ( N = 15), which formed part of a larger project investigating a range of older people???s concerns about end of life care. We set the findings in the context of debates about broader changes to family forms within late modernity, alongside social change and demographic shifts. Our focus on end of life care and bereavement sheds light on a series of relatively neglected issues associated with lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) ageing and, more broadly, the topics of care and support within ???non-traditional??? intimate relationships and personal networks. We point to the importance of further research into the lives of older lesbians and gay men facing issues of end of life care and bereavement.

    View record details
  • ???A lesbian family in a straight world???: The impact of the transition to parenthood on the couple relationship in planned families

    O'Neill, Kristal (2011)

    Masters thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim: To explore the experiences of lesbian women in the transition to planned parenthood, and the impact that this transition has on their relationship. Objectives: To identify key changes which lesbians described as being of significance in becoming parents and explore how these key changes affected the relationship, and to examine the responses from friends, family and health professionals during the transition to parenthood. Method: A general exploratory qualitative approach which employed in-depth semi structured interviews was used. Eight participants were interviewed. Queer theory was used as a theoretical framework to interpret data. Findings: The three main themes which emerged from the findings were a lesbian family in a straight world, donors and biology and two mothers. Findings reveal that lesbian women face a number of challenges in the transition to parenthood. Lesbians must go to lengths to achieve a pregnancy, as they must find a suitable donor before attempting to conceive. Post birth, fatigue, focusing on the baby, changes in sexual relationships, and changes in leisure time all impacted on the relationship. Viewed through a lens of queer theory, relationships were impacted by societal heteronormativity and homophobia, including an emphasis on biology and a lack of recognition apparent for non-biological parents. The responses of others, including friends, family, and health professionals, ranged from positive and supportive, to insulting and misinformed. Negotiating the health care system involved issues of power dynamics and lesbian women needed to constantly 'come out'. The acknowledgement of the relationship was felt to be important, and lesbians seek lesbian friendly health professionals to avoid homophobia. Conclusion The research has implications for health professionals, teachers, teaching and clinical environments, government, policy, and lesbian women. Recommendations concerning culturally safe practice, early childhood, primary, tertiary and postgraduate education are made, followed by recommendations for practice and clinical environments. Education for professionals is discussed, as well as recommendations for legislation and policy change.

    View record details
  • "I just want to be who I am" : Exploring the barriers faced by lesbian early childhood teachers as they disrupt heteronormative practices in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

    Cooper, Kathleen Fleur (2015)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis reports on a small scale qualitative research project located in Aotearoa/New Zealand. The objective of the research was to understand how lesbian teachers disrupt heteronormativity in early childhood settings. The literature was reviewed nationally and internationally. It argues that heteronormativity is the main barrier preventing teachers speaking about lesbian and gay issues. Heteronormativity is a discourse that works to maintain heterosexual hegemony. As a result of this dominance, acceptance of lesbian and gay issues is still a contentious issue within Aotearoa/New Zealand early childhood settings. This study provided an opportunity for heteronormativity to be viewed solely from a lesbian teacher’s paradigm. My intention was to also examine the strategies that participants used to challenge heteronormative dominance. Participants negotiated risks to ensure that both children and adults were aware of the hegemonic view point enforced by heteronormativity. A feminist post-structuralist and queer theory paradigm was used to frame the analytical approach.

    View record details
  • Shadow dancing in the wings : lesbian women talk about health care : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Nursing at Massey University

    Clear, Geraldine M (2000)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    Women who claim a lesbian identity as part of their cultural articulation have to date been poorly represented within research particularly within a New Zealand setting. Rather than couch this single identifier within a contextualised environment, research has predominantly sought to pathologise lesbian existence at an individualistic level. Lesbian women are a minority group for whom crucial differences from the dominant culture may not readily be recognisable. Such differences may be associated with existing in a society where silence and invisibility subsume a meaningful and tangible cultural expression. This study aims to explore the factors which hinder or facilitate sense of safety for lesbian women, when accessing health care, in order to provide information from which health professionals may judge the appropriateness of their current service delivery. A participatory approach grounded in both critical social and feminist research has been utilised to explore issues relevant to health care and it's access with seven women who claim lesbian as part of their identity. The representational void is uncovered and forms a suitable backdrop from whence to explore with these participants health issues and factors relevant for them in the context of their daily lives. The concept of cultural safety gives power to the users of services to determine whether or not they feel safe. From the perception of the service user then, cultural safety assumes that the nurse (or other health care professional) is the extraordinary element as opposed to the neo-colonial held view that the user is the extraordinary member of the interaction (Ramsden, 1995). Cultural safety is the term originally employed in New Zealand to describe the partnership between nursing and the indigenous people intent upon removing barriers in order to facilitate safe access and delivery of health care. From this juncture the Nursing Council of New Zealand (1996) acknowledging that prejudicial and judgmental attitudes exist with regard to lesbian women has fostered awareness. Subsequently the need for appropriate qualitative research has been recognised. In support of the tenets of cultural safety this study will prove useful to nurses and other health professionals intent upon ensuring safe care provision for this marginalised group.

    View record details
  • Policing the boundaries : issues of identity and community in New Zealand lesbian newsletters 1973-1992 : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Women's Studies at Massey University

    Ward, Mary-Helen (1995)

    Masters thesis
    Massey University

    The concept of identity was taken for granted as a basis for political activity by lesbian feminist communities worldwide in the 1970s and 1980s. An examination of the history and implications of this concept, using the writings of Fuss, Cohen, Stein, Phelan and Alice, reveals that it has sometimes been deeply implicated in narrow, rigid, essentialist thinking. There is little evidence of attempts during those decades to deconstruct the notions of identity on which were based key theories such as the political implications of the personal, political correctness, and a notion of lesbian 'purity'. In New Zealand, some of the implications of understanding 'lesbian identity' as universal can be examined through the lesbian newsletters. The collectives which put together these newsletters from 1973 to 1992 wrote with an implicit faith in the notion of 'lesbian identity politics' and in the dictum 'the personal is the political'. This belief limited what they could see as in possibilities of relationships with other lesbians, with other feminists, with gay men, and with the wider community of New Zealand society at the time. A careful, detailed reading of the nationally available newsletters gives a picture of the emergence of 'political correctness', although there are also traces of evidence of other lesbians for whom the idea of political correctness is unacceptable. The presentation of the issues of the place of separatism, expressions of sexual desire, relationships with heterosexual feminists and with other 'queer' groups, reveals how the 'personal' was politicised in terms of narrow notions of identity. Political issues which the newsletters represented as especially affecting lesbians include Homosexual Law Reform and widening amendments to the Human Rights Legislation, some of the policies of the Ministry of Women's Affairs, and issues around race and racism. Examination of how these issues were dealt with in the newsletters shows how the framework of lesbian identity politics limited how these 'political' issues were made personal for readers.

    View record details