Employee fairness perceptions of performance appraisal: a Saint Lucian case study

Author: Narcisse, Sharon; Harcourt, Mark

Date: 2008

Publisher: Routledge

Type: Journal article

Link to this item using this URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10289/8253

University of Waikato

Abstract

This research identifies the essential factors which influence employees' fairness perceptions of their performance appraisals, and determines the applicability of these factors to the experiences of employees in a Saint Lucian public service organization. Fairness perceptions are of three main types. First, distributive justice refers to the perceived fairness of an actual appraisal rating. Second, procedural justice refers to the perceived fairness of procedures used to determine the appraisal rating. Third, interactional justice refers to the perceived fairness of the rater's interpersonal treatment of the ratee during the appraisal process. A qualitative case study method was used to gain a rich understanding of employee perceptions of the fairness of their performance appraisals. Data were obtained from both completed appraisal forms and interviews with 20 knowledgeable employees. All interviews were transcribed and assessed using a thematic analysis. Overall, results show that distributive, procedural, and interactional justice factors identified in the existing literature influence employee perceptions of fairness in their appraisals. Results suggest that employees also consider four additional justice factors, as yet not formally recognized in the justice literature, one distributive – the consistency in reward distribution – and three procedural – appraisal frequency, job relevant criteria, and rater and ratee training.

Subjects: fairness, justice, performance appraisal

Citation: ["Narcisse, S., & Harcourt, M. (2008). Employee fairness perceptions of performance appraisal: a Saint Lucian case study. The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 19(6), 1152-1169."]