318,117 results

  • Te Ua and the Hauhau faith in the light of the Ua gospel notebook

    Head, L. F. (1983)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The argument of this thesis is that the Hauhau faith founded by Te Ua was not a reversion to classical Maori religion, nor a synthesis of Maori and Pakeha elements. It was rather a biblical religion firmly within the Judeo Christian tradition. The argument is advanced by an examination of Te Ua's message of deliverance, his theology, the organisation he devised for the faith, and his views on politics, war and peace. The evidence for the conclusions reached is principally to be found in the Ua Gospel Notebook.

    View record details
  • A comparison of the stable isotopic ecology of eastern, western, and pre-human forest ecosystems in the South Island of New Zealand

    Johnston, Olivia Rose (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    New Zealand forests have been reduced and degraded by gross removal, logging, and the effects of mammals introduced by Polynesian and European settlers. These changes increase the value of the remaining forests, so information on the effects of these disturbances will be useful to inform the management of forest protection. Integrated measurements of C and N cycling within forests can be obtained using foliar stable isotope ratios, which may detect differences between forests resulting from natural or anthropogenic disturbances. This thesis characterises the stable isotopic composition distribution and likely drivers of isotopic variation of vegetation in several central South Island forests, and provides a baseline for future ecological New Zealand studies of present and pre-human vegetation. The largest detected stable isotope variation in modern leaf material was that of δ15N values between the eastern and western podocarp-broadleaf forests. This variation was probably controlled by the lower soil N availability associated with the high rainfall of western forests causing low δ15N values (-8.5 ± 3.5 ‰) relative to an eastern forest (+1.6 ± 1.3 ‰) and global temperate forests (average -2.8 ± 2.0 ‰ (Martinelli et al. 1999)). The significant but slightly higher mean δ15N (0.6 ‰) of a historically selectively logged forest (Saltwater Forest) in comparison to the mean in an unlogged forest (Okarito Forest), on the West Coast, could be attributed to either alteration to N cycling from logging, site differences in topography, or local soil N differences between the forests. Although δ13C showed no significant geographical variation, the well-described ‘canopy effect’ was observed in all modern forests, manifested as a positive covariation between δ13C and vegetation height. Similarly, large taxon-specific differences were observed between δ15N and δ13C values in both modern and fossil leaves. Well-preserved fossil leaves, from sediments c. 4500 years B.P in Pyramid Valley, North Canterbury, had higher δ13C (4.2 ‰) and δ15N (2.5 ‰) values than modern vegetation from Riccarton Bush, Christchurch. The difference between ecosystems spanning several millennia probably reflects ecosystem-scale changes in C and N cycling within New Zealand forests following human arrival, particularly from the degradation caused by invasive animals.

    View record details
  • Heat transfer through cavity walls

    Lishomwa, Lufwendo (1977)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The aims of this study were: (a) to develop a numerical method and (b) to develop an experimental method for the prediction of heat transfer in a cavity in which radiative transfer, gaseous and solid conduction are occurring. In the experiments, the thermal conductivities of various materials (perspex, durotherm and particle board) were measured to within 1%. The rates of heat transfer across the materials (specimens) were measured for different values of: (a) temperature difference across the specimens - dT varied between 1°C and 51°C (b) material (specimen) thickness - 5.6mm, 9.7mm, 11mm, 12mm and 19mm thick specimens were used (c) cavity size - 30.5mm, 34.925mm, 35.5mm and 40.5mm diameter holes were used. The results are presented in graphical and tabular forms (rate of heat transfer versus temperature drop). As expected, the rates of total heat transfer decreased with increases in the hole size and specimen thickness. The effects of radiation transfer were assessed by blocking the holes with aluminium foil. The results showed that radiation transfer was small (about 5% of the total heat transferred). For four different values of the emissivity of aluminium (0.04, 0.11, 0.2 and 0.5), the method computed: (a) the heat transferred by solid conduction - this was found to be constant for all values of emissivity (b) the heat transferred by gaseous (air) conduction - this too did not vary with emissivity (c) the radiation transferred between the surfaces in the hole - this varied significantly with emissivity (d) the total heat transferred. The results obtained from the numerical simulations are presented in graphical and tabular forms. Depending on the emissivity value used, the percentage of radiation transfer varied between 2 and 15% of the total heat transferred. Correspondingly, the air conduction varied between 9 and 17% of the total heat transferred. Hence solid conduction was the dominant mode of heat transfer (68 to 89% of the total heat transferred). When using the material durotherm, the experimental and the theoretical results were in agreement within the limits of experimental error. When using perspex, only half of the results were within the limits of experimental error. The discrepancies for the perspex runs varied between 2 and 26%. Reasons are advanced to explain these discrepancies.

    View record details
  • Measuring VOCs in Christchurch ambient air : using SIFT-MS technique

    Chalermot, Warawan (2002)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The project is aimed at monitoring the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that may be regarded as undesirable in Christchurch's ambient air. Nine VOCs viz NH₃ (ammonia), C₂H₄ (acetylene), C₃H₆ (propene), CH₃OH (methanol), C₂H₅OH (ethanol), CH₃CHO (acetaldehyde), C₆H₆ (benzene), C₇H₈ (toluene) and C₈H₁₀ (xylene) were selected to be examined diurnally and seasonally. The samples were taken from various areas around the city. The selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) technique was chosen as the analytical technique for the study as its fast analysis time and high sensitivity (10 ppb to 40 ppm) give it a significant advantage over more conventional methods. Among the results found were unexpected converse behaviour of the dominant species C₃H₆ (propene) and CH₃OH (ethanol). In winter, C₃H₆ (propene) was the dominant pollutant of the nine selected VOCs whereas in summer it was C₂H₅OH (ethanol). Further, the concentration ratios of C₆H₆ (benzene) to C₇H₆ (toluene) are different from the value reported in other cities for urban atmospheric air. The presence of these species at the concentration levels found in the atmospheric conditions prevailing here are sufficiently high to be of concern and a monitoring program is advised.

    View record details
  • Resilience to food insecurity: Measuring access to food in the urban environment

    Reynolds, Stuart David (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Food security in urban environments is becoming an increasingly important issue worldwide; urban expansion and urban infilling means that city populations are rising while the amount of available land for growing food is reducing. Accessibility of food, in regards to potential food growing space and food retail locations at the household level, is a key indicator for determining how resilient households are to food insecurity. This thesis investigates accessibility of food in urban environments, and a methodology has been developed that employs a non location-specific data structure that assigns resilience categories to individual households. User-defined input variables for the amount of food-growing space required per person, and the maximum travel distance allowed, mean that different scenarios can be created. Two case studies of Christchurch and Stockholm are used to demonstrate how different datasets can be incorporated to give insight into the levels of resilience to food insecurity. Examples of potential sources of error caused by the variations in input dataset quality have been uncovered in the case studies, and possible strategies for dealing with these sources of error are discussed. Results of this study showed that greater maximum travel distances play a key role in accessibility of food in the urban environment, and that both cities are reliant on food retailers to supply food to the urban population, even when potential food growing space is taken into account. City planners or decision-makers can use the methodology developed in this thesis to make decisions about where potential growing space needs to be protected or allocated. They can also use it to model the potential effects of different scenarios, such as the addition of new subdivisions or changes in land use for public land.

    View record details
  • The Effects of the Earthquakes on the Classical Musical Life of Christchurch, September 2010 - May 2013

    Moore, Andrew (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    As part of the Canterbury Earthquake Digital Archive, this thesis documents the effects of the earthquakes on the musical life of Christchurch. It concentrates, primarily, on the classical music scene. The thesis examines the difficulties experienced by musical organisations, individual musicians, and teachers as they sought to bring music to the broken city, together with the measures that were necessary in order to overcome those difficulties. It examines how those organisations have worked to re-establish themselves in their particular musical fields. It charts the progress made, to date, along the path to recovery and offers suggestions regarding precautionary measures which, if instituted, could reduce the after-effects of a future disaster. Recognising that not all of the difficulties encountered were directly related to the earthquakes, this thesis also examines the effects on music and musicians, of decision making associated with the recovery effort. The thesis also demonstrates how a destructive event can provide the inspiration for creativity. It recognises the importance of music in maintaining a sense of normality for people, whether they realise it or not, as well as its influences in providing emotional relief in times of stress. Hopefully, it may become a useful guide to which other cities that may be faced with some natural disaster, could refer.

    View record details
  • Rehabilitative Input and Support Received by Older Adults following a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury event.

    Taylor, Olivia (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Introduction: Older adults have been shown to be particularly vulnerable to the effects of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, limited research exists that examines the information and support received by older adults after a TBI, despite suggestions that input may be insufficient. We therefore aimed to evaluate the information and rehabilitative support received by individuals after mTBI, and to determine whether there were any age-related differences. Method: Adults (n = 250) who presented at the Christchurch Hospital Emergency Department over a 12 month period, with a diagnosis of mTBI were invited to participate in the study. Of these, 106 consented and 80 were able to be contacted for follow up. Participants were aged 18-85 years (M = 48) and evenly distributed into four age groups (18-30, 31-50, 51-65 and 66-85 years). Participants were interviewed over the phone using a questionnaire developed in a pilot study. Questions focussed on information and treatment received after the participants’ injury, as well as questions about cognitive and mood problems following the injury. Data was analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. Results: There were no significant differences between age groups for the number of post-TBI symptoms reported by participants. However, as predicted, the post-injury information and assistance received were inconsistent and differed across groups: 25% of all participants did not receive any information after their TBI, and older adults were the least satisfied with the information received. Post-injury assistance was most commonly offered by friends, family and significant others, but this may not have been sufficient to encourage complete recovery. Participants made suggestions for assistance and support that they would have liked following their injury. Conclusions: The current study has significant implications for the treatment of mTBI as ill-informed and neglected patients are unlikely to return to pre-injury functioning and mental state. Furthermore, a rapidly increasing older population makes immediate attention to mTBI in older adults imperative.

    View record details
  • Pilot Testing a Music Appreciation Training Program for Cochlear Implant Recipients and Users of Hearing Aids

    King, Jason Philip Allen (2013)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A clinically-focused music appreciation training program (MATP) was developed for use by recipients of cochlear implants (CI) and wearers of hearing aids (HA). It aimed to enhance listeners’ music appreciation abilities, with a specific focus on timbre and musical style. The MATP was pilot-tested on 17 adult postlingually deafened CI recipients (8 female, 9 male, mean age = 60.2 years) and 13 adult HA users (7 female, 4 male, mean age = 63.9 years), with each device group divided into a control and a training group. The training groups were asked to use the MATP for 30 minutes per day four times a week for 10 weeks. The control groups were asked to continue with their normal listening habits for the same time period. Both the training and control groups were assessed on tests of instrument, ensemble and style identification as well as pleasantness ratings of musical excerpts, before and after the 10-week period. Participants in the training groups also completed a program evaluation questionnaire at the end of the training period. The results showed that the training program significantly improved the quality ratings of CI recipients for ensemble stimuli (p = .034). There were, however, no significant improvements for CI users on the timbre discrimination tasks or quality ratings for single instruments, nor were there any significant improvements for the HA users on any of the discrimination tasks or in their quality ratings. The findings suggest that CI recipients’ quality appraisal can be improved through training, independent of perceptual accuracy. On evaluating the program, the majority of CI and HA trainees reported that the MATP was enjoyable and beneficial in terms of music appreciation. Future directions for continued development of the MATP and testing of its efficacy are discussed.

    View record details
  • How the Marsden Fund has failed to achieve its full potential in the ESA panel: evidence of limitations in scope, biased outcomes, and futile applications

    Bryan, Karin R.; Lowe, David J. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    We have analysed the scope of proposals funded by the ‘Earth Sciences and Astronomy’ (ESA) panel of the Marsden Fund for the period 2004 to 2013. The scope of proposals funded is very limited and does not reflect the full remit of the panel: the successful projects fail to encompass the quality and quantity of research being undertaken within the Earth sciences community in New Zealand, and a number of sub-disciplines that seek to address fundamental and important problems within the Earth sciences are largely excluded. Moreover, nearly 50% of the funded proposals for the past decade have been made to just two institutions. To address these limitations, we suggest that: (1) a review is undertaken to examine and widen the scope of the panel to encompass sub-disciplines that demonstrably are never or rarely funded; (2) the composition of panel members be examined and modified to reflect a much wider scope of sub-disciplines within the Earth sciences; and (3) a review of the wide discrepancies in funding distributions on an institutional basis be undertaken. We want to ensure that a more representative range of sub-disciplines, in keeping with modern and realistic definitions of the Earth sciences, is funded through this panel, and so we also recommend the formation of a new panel for ‘Environmental and Earth-system Sciences’ that could encompass the research involving modern-day processes so that applications in these sub-disciplines are not pointless. In addition, it is clear that a very substantial increase in funding to the Marsden Fund must be sought.

    View record details
  • Excellent Universities, Here, There and Everywhere

    Sturm, Sean; Turner, Stephen (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We are asked to address the university today in the local context of the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where we live and work. On the one hand, this is an educational setting at the ends of the earth, exotic and exciting (perhaps); on the other, and rather more apropos, this is a university much like any other. Very much wanting to be Melbourne, it is probably also rather more like Minnesota (no disrespect intended). In any case, the difference between all three, in terms of their globalising design-drive, is negligible. The league tabling of universities worldwide has produced an uncanny genericity ??? universality, even ??? of aims, objectives and outcomes, which is to say, university mission statements (UMSs): excellence, enterprise and efficiency. And it has greatly increased the importance of the measures (???econometrics???) that assure us that these ends, to which all who work in universities must devote themselves, have been achieved.

    View record details
  • Cardinal Newman in the Crystal Palace and the Idea of the University Today

    Sturm, Sean; Turner, Stephen (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The university can no longer be defended on the basis of a two-culture model, that is, on the separation of the ???good??? humanist arts and the ???bad??? technical sciences (see Snow, 1959). In fact, it is the mediated ???humanity??? of our technologised lives that suggests other grounds of community: in the idle use of contemporary technology, both in- and outside the workplace, we find the idea of the university at its best. What we mean by being idle or idling is a kind of work and thinking that goes beyond the preset terms of ???work-programming and work-controlling apparatuses???, a phrase that we take from media theorist Vil??m Flusser (2000, p. 25) and that includes any corporate apparatus, including the university. The remapping of our lives according to the possibilities enabled by new technologies must indeed be the object of our teaching and research in the university???but this remapping cannot exclude the university in which that teaching and research takes place. Our brief, then, is to consider the history of the idea of the university, the means by which the value of education can be assessed, and the design drive of neoliberal technocapitalism as enacted in the 'idea' of university today. This means recasting the obsolete humanities/science divide in the light of emerging knowledge-practices, in particular, the networks of distributed intelligence that constitute the new neural academy.

    View record details
  • The university beside itself

    Sturm, Sean; Turner, Stephen (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Our title refers to the university as an object of invention, or discovery, rather than as an existing institution. In our experience, the university of discovery is ???beside itself??? in two senses. To be ???beside oneself??? means to be at a complete loss, not to know ??? or to know how to know ??? what to do.

    View record details
  • Breaking the Rules: Supporting Learning and Teaching Technology Innovations

    Uys, P; Gunn, Catherine (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    The learning and teaching landscape in higher education fails to actively support innovators to experiment with new technologies and educational methods. It is also a poor provider of ongoing support for innovations after start up funding runs out. There are tensions between enterprise systems and ???grass roots??? initiatives in a context where technology is changing rapidly and institutions are slow to respond. Innovators in learning and teaching using emergent technologies are often treated as suspects in an undefined crime. They are pushing boundaries... and bureaucratic institutional buttons! Charles Sturt University (CSU) took an unprecedented step to break these punitive rules of engagement with an institutional Learning and Teaching through Technology Innovation Support Service (LATISS). The LATISS is described within the framework of a four phase learning and teaching with technology innovation (FPLTI) management model, and offered to other institutions of higher education as a means to foster innovation.

    View record details
  • Progressive and Reactionary Attitudes towards Technology in Twentieth Century Literature, 1937-2013

    Potts, Michael Gordon Ralph (2014)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In this thesis I trace the origins, morphology, and attributes of a particular strain of anti-materialism in the Western literary and cultural imagination of the second half of the twentieth century. With reference to previous work done on this topic I discuss how this anti-materialism rejects materialistic and rationalistic aspects of modernity and emphasises instead the importance of non-material aspects of society such as cultural integrity and cohesion, tradition, and instinct. I demonstrate that this strain relies on what Raymond Williams termed “organic form”, the fallacious belief that human society can and should follow a set of rules which can be objectively deducted from nature and I argue that it should be placed within the context of a long established anti-enlightenment tradition. Through an analysis of such writers as George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, JRR Tolkien, Edward Abbey, James Howard Kunstler, Chuck Palahniuk, Brian Aldiss and others I show how a common feature of this anti-materialism is concern and anxiety over the potentially destabilising or degenerative effects of life in a technologically advanced society where mechanisation, mass production, and scientific advances have brought relative comfort and prosperity to most people in society and hence I refer to this particular strain of anti-materialism as anti-technologism. More specifically, I am interested in this thesis with examining the way in which this reaction allows for a curious confluence and convergence of progressive and reactionary tendencies. I argue that anti-technologism is a distinct and detectable mood in Western literature, and I trace its origins and influences. Without claiming to provide a functionalist analysis, I consider the role of anti-technologism in Western literature which I see as broadly facilitating an exploration and discussion of themes of cultural vitality and cohesion in the increasingly cosmopolitan and technologically advanced societies of the West.

    View record details
  • A comparative study of riparian drain management and its effects on phosphate and sediment inputs to Te Waihora/Lake Ellesmere.

    Mitchell, Hannah Laugesen (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Issues affecting water quality are seen as one of the most important and pressing global problems of our era. In New Zealand, water bodies with the poorest water quality and ecological condition tend to be surrounded by pastoral land use. Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora in Canterbury, New Zealand, is a typical example of the issues that nutrient and sediment run-off from pastoral land can create. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between sediment concentrations, phosphate concentrations, ecological state and the degree of riparian restoration on drains that flowed into Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora, and to calculate the load of phosphorus and sediment delivered by each of the drains to Te Waihora over the year, comparing this to the loads carried by larger, natural streams and rivers. Little research has been done on these small artificial tributaries of the Lake Ellesmere/Te Waihora catchment. Data collection was carried out on 10 drains with variable degrees of riparian planting, monthly in summer and autumn, and fortnightly in winter and spring, due to higher variability in drain flows during this time. Sites 1, 2 had low dissolved oxygen (DO) and high total phosphorus (TP), lack of flow and extremely high conductivity, and (with) Site 5, higher suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentrations. All these factors are consistent with the lack of ecology occurring in these drains. All drains failed to meet the Australian and New Zealand Environment and Conservation Council (ANZECC) guidelines for TP concentrations. All water chemistry parameters showed significant differences between seasons except conductivity. Mean water temperatures and pH were higher in summer and lower in winter, while mean DO levels were higher in winter (and spring) and lower in summer (and autumn). Macroinvertebrate analyses indicated moderate to severe pollution in all the drains, despite the amount of riparian planting present and the presence of macroinvertebrate community structure was related mainly to substrate size. The degree and type of riparian planting present on the drains studied did not appear to affect TP, SPM, macroinvertebrates or general water quality. This is likely to be due to the fact that little of the riparian planting had been specifically planted for restoration purposes. The highest loads of TP and SPM occurred in winter and spring, and in the larger (wider and deeper) drains. As flow increased in the drain, so did the load of phosphorus and sediment carried. Comparison with Environment Canterbury monitoring data for the river tributaries of the lake indicated that more TP and SPM is carried to the lake by natural rivers and streams, than by the drains, but the latter do make a significant contribution. The percentage of TP that is in dissolved form was higher than had previously been assumed, in both the drains and the larger, natural rivers and streams. It is recommended that future restoration work aim to reduce the amount of phosphorus and sediment entering the larger drains in winter and spring. More adequate riparian planting needs to occur on these drains, and it needs to be managed in a way that a reduction in dissolved phosphorus levels is also achieved.

    View record details
  • The Inangahua earthquake : an application of the Powell and Rayner model of disaster-time

    Britton, Neil R. (1979)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This study is a contribution to research within the sociology of disasters. The material is presented in two inter-related parts. The first four chapters provide an introduction and a background to disaster research from a sociological perspective. This portion of the study also provides the framework - Powell and Rayner's (1952) model of Disaster Time - upon which a specific disaster will be considered. The disaster which this research focusses upon is introduced in the fifth chapter, that is, the May 24, 1968 Richter 7 magnitude earthquake centred 15 kilometres north of the township of Inangahua in the South Island of New Zealand. Briefly, the contents of the study are: Chapter I introduces definitions and discussions of Natural Hazards, Natural Disaster, and Collective Stress Situations. Chapter II is devoted to a discussion of one of the most formidable natural hazard agents - earthquakes. This discussion of earthquakes is directed primarily on the New Zealand situation. The orientation of Chapter III is (a) to provide a discussion of the sociological perspectives as they apply to disaster research; (b) to introduce a discussion of the variables that a researcher has to consider when analysing a disaster; (c) to present examples of sociological models of disaster time, and a model of disaster space, and, (d) to introduce the Powell and Rayner model of Disaster Time. Powell and Rayner in 1952 proposed a descriptive scheme for a disaster, based on a formulation in terms of developmental stages. They characterised each stage by its own integrative mechanisms, distinctive variables, and a set of unique tasks for each of the various actions of the affected social system. The stages developed by this model are: the Pre-Emergency Phase, which consists of a Pre-Warning stage; the Emergency States, comprising Warning, Threat, Impact, Inventory, Rescue and Remedy; and a Post-Emergency Phase, which they termed 'Recovery'. Chapter IV presents a discussion of the methods used in disaster research. This chapter also contains the methods used in the analysis of the 1968 Inangahua Earthquake, from which this study is a result. Chapter V begins with information about the Inangahua region - a short history of the Inangahua region; counter-measure agencies in the Inangahua area; an attempt to assess the 'West Coast character'; a brief discussion of earthquakes in the Inangahua area. Against this background, and within the framework of Powell and Rayner's model, the earthquake of 1968 is reviewed. The final Chapter (Chapter VI) entitled, 'Reflections on the Powell and Rayner model of Disaster Time', looks at problems applying the model; the limitations of the model; the strengths of the model; and the application of the model to earthquakes.

    View record details
  • Energy Balance Models With Three Phases Of Water Feedback

    Fullick, Simon Geoffrey (2014)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Simple one-dimensional heat balance equations have been used to understand climate concepts since the 1960s, when a class of models was developed known as energy balance models (EBMs). EBMs use the growth or loss of polar surface ice as a climatic feedback, giving rise to surprisingly complex non-linear behaviours. One aspect of EBMs that has been relatively poorly examined is the effects of feedbacks caused by the other two phases of water in Earth’s climate other than ice: water clouds and water vapour. Cloud and water vapour play a critical role in the energy balance of Earth’s climate, and yet are some of the least well understood elements of the global climate system. This thesis explores the behaviour and interrelationships of climatic feedbacks caused by water in all three phases as it exists in the climate: surface ice caps, water vapour, and liquid water clouds. A two-layered EBM was modified with parameterizations of water vapour and liquid water clouds in order to conduct experiments. Three variants of the model were produced, each with progressively more water feedbacks than the last: a 1 phase model (with only surface ice feedback), a 2 phase model (with surface ice and water vapour) and a 3 phase model (with surface ice, water vapour, and cloud). The models were found to give generally realistic results, but with an underestimation of water vapour density, which in turn reduced the generated cloud fraction in the 3 phase model. Thus, the impacts of these extra feedbacks were likely to be underestimated in the analysis in general. The sensitivity of the model to several prognostic variables was studied by observing the changes in the model to a range of each variable. The 3 phase model was less sensitive to changes to the solar constant, S0, which measures incoming solar radiation, than the 1 phase model. This was probably caused by cloud reflecting and absorbing some radiation from the sun that would have otherwise reached the surface, changing the ratio of atmospheric heat transport to surface heat transport from 2.4953 for the 1 phase model to 2.0626 for the 3 phase model. Changing surface and ice albedo values resulted in changes in the model’s stability. The model was found to be insensitive to changes in surface humidity that drives the amount of water vapour the system has available, due to underestimation of water vapour in the model. The stability of the model was examined, and the 1 phase model was found to respond faster to changes in S0 than the 3 phase model. The model was tested for hysteresis, which was confirmed for all three model variants. The 1 phase model showed less stability then the 3 phase model as S0 was increased, but both models were similarly stable as S0 was decreased.

    View record details
  • Investigating the Design and Implementation of Geographic Interfaces

    Pascoe, Richard T. (1988)


    University of Canterbury Library

    The original objective set by LINZ was to design a modular software package to enable data conversion between the proposed New Zealand Transfer File Format standard for digital cartographic data and other transfer file formats. However it was found to be more practical to specify the architecture of the geographic interface and apply existing software tools to implement modules within that architecture. A geographic interface is produced by integrating these modules.

    View record details
  • Improved learning through peer tutoring in a declarative programming course

    Alexander, Samuel T.V.; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein (2014-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    A method of peer tutoring was used and evaluated in an introductory programming course in Haskell. Students were paired on the basis of skill level with pairings opposite those suggested by the existing literature. This method of peer tutoring was shown to be effective in increasing the performance of both high- and low-skilled students in learning a declarative language. This method of peer tutoring can be applied to business and other technology education.

    View record details
  • Eve : an affect-sensitive pedagogical agent

    Fourie, Leon; Overmyer, Scott; Shanbehzadeh, Jamshid; Sarrafzadeh, Hossein; Alexander, Samuel T.V. (2014-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Easy with Eve is an affect-sensitive tutoring system that features Eve, an animated pedagogical agent that adapts to student emotion based on the results of an observational study of human tutors. This paper presents the methodology and results of a study of the effectiveness of Eve, showing evidence that facial expression detection may have enhanced the effect of the presence of Eve on student motivation and beliefs about how much they were able to learn by interacting with the tutoring system, and suggesting areas of improvement to enhance the effectiveness of this system in business training and other context.

    View record details