89,537 results

  • An exploration of the emotional experience of BASE jumping : a thesis submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the award of the degree : Master of Psychology from Massey University, School of Psychology

    Green, Anton Wayne

    Thesis
    Massey University

    BASE jumping is an extreme sport, where participants parachute from fixed objects and deploy a parachute to land safely. According to the current injury and fatality statistics, it is regarded as the most dangerous sport in the world. The level of danger suggests that participants have to negotiate strong emotional experiences in the sport. The aim of this study is to explore the emotions that BASE jumpers experience and determine what role and impact these emotions may play for participants. Twenty male BASE jumpers with at least 10 jumps and 3 months of participation in the sport were interviewed for the study. Qualitative (thematic) analysis was undertaken to analyse the BASE jumping experience. Participants reported intense emotional experiences that predominantly emerged as fear, flow and thrill states. A number of threats associated with these emotions were identified. The experience of fear may become normalised, whilst flow and thrill may lead to an escalation of risk taking in the pursuit of the rush experience. Conflicting feelings create emotional dissonance which also influences coping styles and rationalisation strategies. This may impact risk taking behaviour, judgement and decision making. Outcomes from the study may enhance greater knowledge of psychological processes that impact risk and safety behaviours in the sport.

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  • The survival and growth of Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes, during the manufacture of Ricotta Salata cheese : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters in Food Technology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Su, Boyuan

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This study was conducted with the following objectives: 1) to investigate the survival and growth of Bacillus cereus during the manufacture of Ricotta Salata cheese; and 2) to investigate the survival and growth of Listeria monocytogenes during the manufacture of Ricotta Salata cheese. The Ricotta Salata cheese was made by heating the whole milk to 95oC, and adding citric acid to coagulate the cheese curd. The cheese curd was inoculated with 7 log10 CFU/g B. cereus broth and 8 log10 CFU/g L. monocytogenes broth. After moulding for 12h, Ricotta Salata cheese was stored at 4oC for 1 week. During manufacture, the physico-chemical properties [pH, water activity (aw), and Sodium chloride (NaCl) concentration] and bacterial counts were recorded. The pH change fluctuated between 6.00 to 6.10 on the surface and 6.00 to 5.95 in the centre; the lowest aw was approximately 0.96 on the surface and 0.97 in the centre; and the highest NaCl concentration was 3.3% on the surface and 3% in the centre. The survival and growth of the two B. cereus strains (D1 and ATCC 13061) during the manufacture of Ricotta Salata cheese were similar. The B. cereus grew from approximately 5 log10 CFU/g to a maximum of 7.7 log10 CFU/g of cheese curd during moulding (20h at room temperature). The survival and growth of the two L. monocytogenes strains (W1 and ATCC 35152) during the manufacture of Ricotta Salata cheese were similar. The difference between the bacteria count on the surface and in the centre was very small. L. monocytogenes increased from 5 to 6 log10 CFU/g to a maximum of 8.6 log10 CFU/g during manufacture and maintained a level of around 8 log10 CFU/g in the final product. The Ricotta Salata supported the survival and growth of B. cereus and L. monocytogenes during manufacture. It is important to improve the management of process hygiene for reducing the environmental contamination. Ideally, some lethal treatments should be applied after the packaging of the cheese, to limit the contamination of Ricotta Salata with these two bacteria.

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  • The environmental ethics of the corporatization of agriculture and crop genetic engineering : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Environmental Management at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Walker, Anna

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The corporatization of agriculture has resulted in significant implications for the environment and consequently environmental management. In particular, corporate application of genetic engineering (GE) has resulted in increased and unnecessary environmental risks through inappropriate applications of GE and increased pesticide use. GE technology has in turn allowed for the agriculture industry to become further corporatized. Current environmental management procedures with regard to risk assessment and the regulatory processes of GE crops have proven inadequate in light of such corporate involvement. The research aim of this thesis was to establish whether the corporatization of agriculture, and the consequent corporate application of GE crops, results in breaches of environmental ethics, as defined by the worldviews of biocentrism and ecocentrism. This aim was achieved through the application of a structured literature review, using an interpretive approach within the paradigm of hermeneutics. The literature analysis was carried out on peer-reviewed journal articles from the last 10 year period, within which selected articles were asked a series of interview questions in order to fulfil the research objectives, and consequently the aim. The extracted information was critically considered within the framework of environmental ethics and the contrasting worldviews of anthropocentrism, technocentrism, biocentrism and ecocentrism. The key issue identified was the lack of consideration of biocentric and ecocentric values in the arguments made by corporations and proponents of GE crops as a result of a dominance of anthropocentric and technocentric worldviews. The lack of such values on the part of corporations ensures that both sides of the debate are arguing from different perspectives and as such it seems unlikely that they will ever be able to reach a resolution. This thesis concludes that for progress to be made in the debate on GE agriculture and corporatization, and for appropriate precaution to be employed with regard to risk assessment, the worldview held by agrochemical corporations and proponents of GE needs to shift towards a biocentric and ecocentric understanding of the environment. However, as a complete shift of worldviews on the part of corporations is unlikely, this thesis recommends that attention be shifted away from the polarized controversy in favour of a discussion on coexistence.

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  • 11-Methylpyrido[2,3-b]acridine-5,12-dione

    Copp, Brent; Lindsay, BS; Oliver, AG; Rickard, CEF (2000-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The title molecule, C17H10N2O2, is a synthetic precursor to the cytotoxic marine alkaloid ascididemin and is also structurally related to cleistopholine, a plant-derived antifungal agent. The molecule was found to be essentially planar with the only significant deviations from planarity being for the quinone O atoms.

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  • Synthesis report Accelerated Education Working Group: Accelerated education principles field studies

    Shah, Ritesh; Flemming, J; Boisvert, K (2017)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Case study report: Children in Crisis Afghanistan

    Shah, Ritesh (2017)

    Report
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Neolithic Pottery of Egypt: Investigating settlement pattern in middle Holocene northeast Africa with ceramics

    Emmitt, Joshua (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the past the settlement pattern of middle Holocene Egypt was based on the presence or absence of material correlates including structures, stone tools, pottery, and domesticated plants and animals. Together these formed the traits of a Neolithic package that were thought to spread from southwest Asia to Egypt during the middle Holocene. Modern research now shows that the traits attributed to the Neolithic package did not develop uniformly over time and space, so the package concept is less useful. Contemporary approaches focus on processes such as mobility, occupation duration, and use-of-place to draw inferences about settlement pattern. These are measured through analysis of material culture such as stone artefacts and the placement of features on a landscape. However, more examples are required that use material culture types that are abundant and preserve well, such as pottery. Past research has focused on the analysis of a small proportion of pottery assemblages, typically whole vessels and decorated sherds, both used to form typologies and identify cultural groupings. Similarities in decorative styles or vessel forms are used to infer movement between different cultural groups. However, these culture-historical interpretations mean that large volumes of un-diagnostic sherds are often disregarded. This research uses non-destructive methods, such as x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and fragmentation ratios, to analyse all artefacts in pottery assemblages to understand the impact of the previously noted processes. XRF analysis is used to identify the geochemical signatures of the materials used in pottery manufacture. This analysis enables the identification of pottery that is not likely made locally and so provides a proxy for movement. The differential fragmentation of pottery is used in estimates of how many vessels the sherds in an assemblage represent and so provides a means for assessing occupation duration. Pottery from several places in Egypt that date to the middle Holocene are compared. Results suggest movement between locations beyond what was previously inferred based on culture-historical interpretations. These results are interpreted in the wider North African context.

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  • A template for change? De-risking the transition to CDIO

    Robinson, K; Friedrich, Heide; Kirkpatrick, Robert; Nicholas, C; Rowe, Gerard (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper provides a case study on how an established, mature engineering faculty, with a large population of students can make the successful, high risk, step change transition towards the delivery of CDIO objectives - ???Graduating engineers who can conceive-design-implement-operate complex value-added engineering systems in a modern team-based environment??? [1]. The successful results of the project demonstrated the effectiveness of the Systems Thinking and CDIO approach and endorsed this as the basis for a major change strategy. Not only did it demonstrate the quality of all the students on the course, their potential and commitment to engineering, but it also demonstrated willingness of the faculty to take a risk and to embrace change. The project scenario opened up an otherwise overlooked teaching resource ??? that of practitioner lecturers with many years of experience of implementation and operation of major projects. These skills were essential to the scoping, design, planning and implementation of the project as well as giving the backdrop of best practice from industry. Auckland???s experience of introducing a major step change may be used as a Template for other universities who may wish to follow Auckland???s example. This project shows the value of a hearts and minds approach to change as it brought together students, staff and best practice under a multidisciplinary Systems Thinking and CDIO approach - all united in the interests of reconstructing Christchurch.

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  • Counsellor clients as insider experts in a school community

    Pizzini, Nigel; Gremillion, Helen (2017-11-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper describes a practice developed at a large secondary school in Auckland whereby students’ experiences of overcoming problems are made available to others in the form of insider brochures. These students are thus able to share their insights and strategies in support of peers who may be experiencing similar problems. Drawing on narrative counselling conversations as well as narrative community work, a school counsellor facilitates the process. This paper describes how insider voices contribute to the brochures, and provides detail from one case example. In keeping with narrative approaches to problems, the goals are to de-privatise and de-individualise young people’s experiences of difficulties, and to reposition these students from ‘sufferers’ of problems to ‘experts’ on how to overcome them. In the process not only are students’ preferred identities developed, but also collective knowledge is created and students are empowered to support one another.

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  • Change and development in Glen Eden, 2017. Report commissioned by Waitakere Ranges Local Board.

    Haigh, David; Kenkel, David; Doswell, Kate (2017-11-11)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This report is stage one of a report on change and development issues in Glen Eden. The Waitakere Ranges Local Board commissioned staff of the Social Practice Department of Unitec to carry out a two-stage report. This first stage is a literature search looking at material specific to Glen Eden as well as more theoretical information about development and growth. The second stage will be completed by December 2017 and reports on interviews carried out with key stakeholders in Glen Eden. This report makes a number of suggestions to the Waitakere Ranges Local Board relating to redevelopment of the Glen Eden town centre, and to design and urban policies concerning future intensification of Glen Eden with emphasis on strategies to deal with such matters as safety, cycleways and pedestrian amenity. InnovateITP Research Reports (formerly Metro Reports) present research conducted through the Unitec Research Voucher Scheme, which facilitates access by industry and community clients to Unitec research expertise. This research is conducted to client brief, similar to research consultancy. Voucher Scheme projects are published and disseminated according to a recommended, but flexible and adaptable format. In this format there is less emphasis on systematic, comprehensive research justification, elaboration and presentation of findings, but rather an emphasis on research process, narrative and outcomes. Voucher Scheme project reports are intended to be accessible to clients and other research users in ways traditional academic research may not be. All papers are blind reviewed. For more papers in this series please visit: www.unitec.ac.nz/epress/index.php/category/publications/epress-series/metro-reports/.

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  • Delirium assessment and management : a qualitative study on aged-care nurses’ experiences

    Jauny, Ray; Parsons, John (2017-11-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Aged residential care (ARC) residents with morbid health conditions frequently experience delirium. This condition is associated with diminished quality of life, preventable morbidity and untimely death. It is challenging and costly to manage delirium because of the complex interplay of physical and psychiatric symp­toms associated with this condition in both primary and secondary services. With awareness of risk factors and knowledge about delirium, ARC nurses can play a vital role in early identification, assessment and treatment, but most importantly in preventing de­lirium in aged-care residents as well as improving health outcomes

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  • The detection of biotic changes in the Tekapo riverbed after habitat restoration

    Sinclair, Lisa (1995)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • So let it fall : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Creative Writing, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Greeks, Stevie Renee

    Thesis
    Massey University

    What are you? This Master of Creative writing thesis seeks to explore this question and other questions it leads to. The thesis consists of a collection of linked autobiographical stories that explore identity, “So Let it Fall” (80%), and an accompanying exegesis, “What Are You?” (20%). Through the writing of “So Let it Fall” I tell the story of my own experiences as a multi-­‐ethnic woman growing up in New Zealand with mixed Māori, Chinese and Pākehā heritage. I explore this mixed identity throughout my project through evoking contrasts and contradictions within my own personal experiences. Specifically, I tell a story of living between two parents, and I focus on the separations that developed within my life and my identity as a result of living between two cultural upbringings. When evoking different identities in “So Let it Fall,” I wrote in scene to highlight formative moments in my life as well as scenes that illustrate important characteristics in each of my parents that have been formative of my own identity. In the creative work as a whole I delve into the different roles that I have moved through as I grew up, and by doing so discover who I am. The accompanying exegesis “What Are You?” places “So Let it Fall” in context by exploring the driving questions behind this project and explicating the creative process involved. The purpose of this exegesis is to illuminate the ideas and research that went into the production of “So Let it Fall.” This is done first by outlining why I chose the the form of autobiography, then examining a range of recent autobiographical writing in New Zealand and the various perspectives these works offer. Specifically, I discuss how the nonfiction writing of Witi Ihimaera, Manying Ip, Alice Te Punga-­‐Somerville, Tina Makereti, Tze Ming Mok, Ashleigh Young and Tracey Slaughter have informed my work. The intent of this combined creative and critical project is to find value in personal experiences and to create a wider pool of experiences within creative nonfiction writing in New Zealand. This thesis is not constructed to represent or speak for any ethnic groups or identities. This is formation of an identity through autobiographical writing that is my own.

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  • Development and trial of a methodology for the quantification and evaluation of home composting in Palmerston North, New Zealand : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Environmental Management (without major) at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Mensah, Sabina

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Home composting and commercial composting can be regarded as part of the Municipal Solid Waste Management system. Currently, in Palmerston North and more broadly in New Zealand, home composting plays an important, but an unquantified role in waste diversion. In Palmerston North, the quantity of organic waste diverted from landfill via home composting is not captured in the City’s official ‘waste assessment’ or recorded in the ‘waste management and minimisation plan’. Additionally, there appears to be little local social and technical data on why, who, when, what and how well home composting is practised. The aim of this study was to develop and implement a methodology for a mixed-method quantitative-qualitative study for the quantification and evaluation of home composting practices in Palmerston North. The development process for the research methodology drew upon an international literature review of scientific research, a range of municipal best practice guidelines for home composting and referenced elements of the New Zealand composting standard. The data collection for this study involved a combined telephone and door-to-door survey of 300 households (that is, approximately 1% of occupied dwellings, randomly selected from across all 15 suburbs in the City). To support the physical data collection, a novel home composting evaluation tool was also developed and trialled for empirical and quality assurance evaluation. The overall participation rate recorded in the present study (64%) was high and both data collection methods proved to be viable, yielding positive results. 36% of the households who participated in the present study were home composters which could mean that about 10,761 households in the occupied dwellings of the City practise home composting. At the time of the survey, it appears that nearly 4005 tonnes of organic waste was being treated via home composting processes. The results also indicated positive quality assurance of the home composting process and the resulting compost in the City. Whilst most of the study participants have a positive experience towards home composting, nuisance insects, rodents and odour problems were reported as issues. In terms of motivation around current and future home composting practices, a range of support options appears to be available for Councils to encourage and enhance this positive environmental practice.

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  • 'On the path, off the trail' : the relational work of nurses in outreach health : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the degree of Masters of Philosophy in Nursing at Massey University, Wellington, Aotearoa New Zealand

    Martin, Garrick

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This research study draws on the practice reflections of nurses working with people who are homeless and experiencing mental health problems to explore engagement as a core nursing practice in this setting. Therapeutic relationships and engagement are at the heart of nursing practice, and this is especially so in mental health nursing. Homeless and hard-­‐ to-­‐reach clients are an underserved population for mental health services. This research seeks to ‘make visible’ the ways in which mental health nurses uniquely and successfully engage with people experiencing homelessness and marginalisation, which in turn contributes to improved health and social outcomes for those people. Eight New Zealand registered nurses were interviewed and critical thematic analysis used to interpret the resulting data. The research findings were that nurses practicing in this specific homeless health context value relationships as a core nursing intervention. The work of engagement was described as uncertain. The research participants echoed the nursing theory and literature that argues nurses’ relational work is often unseen and undervalued within health systems. Relational work is described as a defining concept for mental health nursing yet the lack of visibility of this skilled work adds to nurses’ experience of uncertainty. The recommendations suggest ways to render visible and hold central the nursing work of engagement.

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  • The computational investigation of a dinuclear manganese complex with Jahn-Teller compression and elongation : MSc thesis, Chemistry, Institute of Fundamental Sciences, Massey University

    Buchanan, Jenna K

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Complexes that possess both Jahn-Teller compression and elongation effects at metal centres within the same molecule are extremely rare with only 11 examples known in the literature. Only two of these examples exist as discrete compounds. Jahn-Teller distortions influence metal-ligand bond lengths as well as the energy levels of the eg and t2g orbitals on the metal centre. The orientation of the Jahn-Teller axes have also been found to be an influential parameter in determining the exchange interactions in MnIII dimers. X-ray crystallographic analysis of a di-manganese coordination compound serendipitously synthesised by Willoughby suggested that the complex possessed both Jahn-Teller compression and elongation. Willoughby’s complex was synthesised in a very low yield and analysis of the crystals obtained by X-ray diffraction gave a structural determination of only moderate quality. In this research project, the complex was computationally modelled in order to investigate the Jahn-Teller distortions and the coupling between the manganese centres. The bond lengths, molecular orbitals and spin density plot were explored in order to investigate these properties. The computational results gave strong evidence that Jahn-Teller compression and elongation were present in the di-manganese complex. The modelled ferromagnetic complex was found to be lower in energy than the modelled antiferromagnetic complex. Attempts were also made to re-synthesise the di-manganese complex in suitable quantity for complete structural and magnetic characterisation. Several different routes were trialled but after exhaustive attempts it was not possible to repeat the synthesis of the dinuclear complex.

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  • Synthesis and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of antimalarial polyamines

    Liew, Lydia; Pearce, Allison; Kaiser, M; Copp, Brent (2013-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    We recently reported that 1,14-diphenylacetamide derivatives of spermine exhibit potent nM in vitro growth inhibition properties of Plasmodium falciparum. In an effort to expand the structure-activity relationship of this compound class towards malaria, we have prepared and biologically tested a library that includes benzamide and 3-phenylpropanamide 'capping acid' groups, and polyamines that include spermine (PA3-4-3) and chain extended analogues PA3-8-3 and PA3-12-3. 2-Hydroxy and 2,5-dimethoxy analogues were typically found to exhibit the most potent activity towards the dual drug resistant strain K1 of P. falciparum with IC50's in the range of 1.3-9.5 nM, and selectivity indices (SI) of 42,300 to 4880. In vivo evaluation of three analogues against Plasmodium berghei was undertaken, with one demonstrating a modest 27.9% reduction in parasitaemia.

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  • Bio-inspired dimerisation of prenylated quinones directed towards the synthesis of the meroterpenoid natural products, the scabellones

    Chan, STS; Pullar, MA; Khalil, IM; Allouche, E; Barker, David; Copp, Brent (2015-03-18)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Stirring 2-geranyl-6-methoxy-1,4-hydroquinone in pyridine/O2 or 2-geranyl-6-methoxy-1,4-benzoquinone in pyridine/N2 affords the dimeric meroterpenoid natural products, scabellones A???C in modest to low yields and also identifies 2-methoxy-6-(4-methylpent-3-en-1-yl)-1,4-naphthoquinone (scabellone E) as a new natural product. The corresponding reaction of the des-methoxy analogue, 2-geranyl-1,4-benzoquinone in degassed pyridine for three days afforded the natural product cordiachromene A (15% yield) and 6-(4-methylpent-3-en-1-yl)-1,4-naphthoquinone (12%), the latter being a likely biosynthetic precursor to the marine meroterpenoid alkaloids, conicaquinones A and B.

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  • The unfulfilled pedagogical promise of the dialogic in writing: Intertextual writing instruction for diverse settings

    Jesson, Rebecca; Parr, Judith; McNaughton, Stuart (2013)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this chapter, the authors use writing as a site to consider the intersection between culture and effective pedagogy. They identify the general principles surrounding pedagogy, which is considered to be culturally responsive, and then examine the research to consider these principles specifically with regard to the teaching of writing in linguistically and culturally diverse contexts. The chapter explores ways to incorporate deliberately the general principles of culturally responsive pedagogy in the teaching of writing. It also offers a view of writing and writing instruction as dialogic, with the aim of incorporating students' existing knowledge and practices. By considering students' intertextual histories as a key resource for writing, the chapter considers that there is potential to develop instruction that is contingent upon and responsive to students' various experiences with texts.

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  • The scaling of population persistence with carrying capacity does not asymptote in populations of a fish experiencing extreme climate variability.

    White RSA; Wintle BA; McHugh PA; Booker DJ; McIntosh AR (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite growing concerns regarding increasing frequency of extreme climate events and declining population sizes, the influence of environmental stochasticity on the relationship between population carrying capacity and time-to-extinction has received little empirical attention. While time-to-extinction increases exponentially with carrying capacity in constant environments, theoretical models suggest increasing environmental stochasticity causes asymptotic scaling, thus making minimum viable carrying capacity vastly uncertain in variable environments. Using empirical estimates of environmental stochasticity in fish metapopulations, we showed that increasing environmental stochasticity resulting from extreme droughts was insufficient to create asymptotic scaling of time-to-extinction with carrying capacity in local populations as predicted by theory. Local time-to-extinction increased with carrying capacity due to declining sensitivity to demographic stochasticity, and the slope of this relationship declined significantly as environmental stochasticity increased. However, recent 1 in 25 yr extreme droughts were insufficient to extirpate populations with large carrying capacity. Consequently, large populations may be more resilient to environmental stochasticity than previously thought. The lack of carrying capacity-related asymptotes in persistence under extreme climate variability reveals how small populations affected by habitat loss or overharvesting, may be disproportionately threatened by increases in extreme climate events with global warming.

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