5,532 results for Auckland University of Technology

  • Teaching the Virtues of Sustainability As Flourishing to Undergraduate Business Students

    Grant, P; McGhee, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Business leaders have a major influence over the achievement of a truly sustainable world; however to do this such leaders need knowledge, which can provide them with convictions that alter both their individual behaviour and their approach to business. Unfortunately in most business schools sustainability is presented as just another strategy for maximising profits. This article describes an undergraduate sustainability course for business students which has transformative potential. Students are exposed to the neo-classical worldview underlying business-as-usual and are challenged to examine what needs to change to reach the goal of sustainability-as-flourishing. More importantly students are helped to draw their own conclusions about the implications of this change for them personally. The uniqueness of this course lies in the fact that students are given the means and tools to action change by introducing them to a virtue ethics framework. This framework provides a blueprint for how individuals can contribute to achieving sustainability as flourishing through the daily practice of virtue and the inspiration of moral exemplars.

    View record details
  • Under Pressure: OHS of Vulnerable Workers in the Construction Industry

    Lamm, F; Moore, D; Nagar, S; Rasmussen, E; Sargeant, M

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The New Zealand construction industry provides a good illustration of the changing nature of work and the impact this has had on the occupational health and safety (OHS) of sub-contracted construction workers. In particular, we examine the vulnerability of workers in the context of the construction industry post-2010 Canterbury earthquakes. In doing so, we apply Quinlan and Bohle’s (2004; 2009) ‘Pressures, Disorganization and Regulatory Failure’ (PDR) model to frame the changing nature and organisation of work and the impact this has had on the OHS of sub-contracted construction workers. Finally, we discuss what can be done going forward in terms of creating a more effective regulatory regime and a safer and healthier industry.

    View record details
  • Measuring Progress and Projecting Attainment on the Basis of Past Trends of the Health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 Countries: An Analysis From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

    Feigin, V; GBD 2016 SDG Collaborators

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • Thoughts Become Things: A Grounded Cognition Approach to Imagery Use in the Power Clean

    Lindsay, Riki

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    While it is widely argued that personalised imagery scripts are beneficial to performers, theory and data to support this contention is sparse. The current study aims to address these issues by investigating: Firstly, what differences in content and description arise from the use of generic and personalised scripts aimed at improving performance in the Power Clean (PC). Secondly, if any differences are reflected in relevant kinematic measures. Sixteen resistance trained individuals were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: personalised imagery (PI), or generic imagery (GI). During baseline testing, participants performed a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) PC along with a recall test which consisted of giving a personal description of the power clean. Personal descriptions of the PC were used to construct imagery scripts for the PI group. Scripts for the GI group were derived from a standard description of the PC obtained from an international level Olympic-Weightlifting coach and current literature on PC technique. Participants completed three PC training sessions per week and listened to an audio-recorded version of their given imagery scripts five times per week. At the end of the training period descriptions of the PC were compared along with kinematic and performance variables including; peak power (PP), peak force (PF), peak velocity (PV) at 80, 90 and 100% of the participants’ 1RM and horizontal bar displacement. There was a significant difference between post-test adjectives used between groups (ES=1.37±1.27). The PI group showed a meaningful increase (23.4 ± 7.8 to 31.1 ± 18.1) compared to a decrease in the GI group (14.6 ± 8.7 to 13.6 ± 7.8). At 100% testing load the PI group experienced changes to Dx2 and DxT which saw the bar caught closer to the participants’ centre of mass in post-testing. The PI group showed small to moderate improvements in PF (80 and 90%) and PV (100%). Findings suggest that PI scripts result in different descriptions of movements and that these differences are of benefit to performance.

    View record details
  • Resource Management for Business Process Scheduling in the Presence of Availability Constraints

    Xu, J; Liu, C; Zhao, X; Yongchareon, S; Ding, Z

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the context of business process management, the resources required by business processes, such as workshop staff, manufacturing machines, etc., tend to follow certain availability patterns, due to maintenance cycles, work shifts and other factors. Such availability patterns heavily influence the efficiency and effectiveness of enterprise resource management. Most existing process scheduling and resource management approaches tend to tune the process structure to seek better resource utilisation, yet neglect the constraints on resource availability. In this article, we investigate the scheduling of business process instances in accordance with resource availability patterns, to find out how enterprise resources can be rationally and sufficiently used. Three heuristic-based planning strategies are proposed to maximise the process instance throughput together with another strategy based on a genetic algorithm. The performance of these strategies has been evaluated by conducting experiments of different settings and analysing the strategy characteristics.

    View record details
  • Using Spiritual Intelligence to Transform Organizational Cultures

    McGhee, P; Grant, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Recently spirituality has become a viable topic of discussion for management scholars seeking a means to enhance work cultures and improve organisational effectiveness. However, the path from spirituality to transforming organisational culture is not immediately obvious. Fortunately, several authors have developed frameworks that provide connections. In particular, the notion of spiritual intelligence (SI hereafter) is helpful. This paper begins by describing spirituality and SI in the context of organisational transformation. It then details research involving working professionals that sought to answer the question: “How (and why) might SI transform organisational culture to be more ethical?” It concludes with discussion and implications of developing and practicing SI in organisational contexts.

    View record details
  • Breathing Therapy Air Delivery Unit: Simulation, Design and Development

    White, David Edward

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although constant positive airway pressure therapy is currently the most effective form of non-invasive treatment to relieve obstructive sleep apnea symptoms, it has relatively low treatment compliance due to pressure related side effects. Existing commercial continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices rely on the combined airflow characteristics of both the air delivery unit and nasal mask vent to regulate treatment pressure. Fluctuation in mask pressure occurs however, due to patient breathing, presenting an opportunity to develop an alternative breathing therapy device capable of achieving dynamic control of mask pressure. Within this research, a computer model of a proposed patient breathing therapy device, based on characteristics of a prototype system, is developed to determine the breathing system air delivery requirements whilst operating under a simulated patient breathing load. This model initially utilises an idealised, zero order, air delivery unit behaviour, since this system element is yet to be built. A review of different types of air compressors is undertaken and the diaphragm type compressor selected as being best suited for practical implementation within the air delivery unit of the breathing system, based on constraints of air quality, available machining resource and materials. Thermodynamic design of the compressor is undertaken to determine physical dimensions and a range of actuation methods are reviewed, based on force and speed requirements. A speed controlled 3 phase AC induction motor is selected to actuate the compressor. The diaphragm compressor is built and tested under both steady state and dynamic conditions and proven capable of meeting the breathing system air supply for both air pressure and flow requirements. The air delivery unit within the model simulation, previously based on an idealised, zero order element, is characterised with the same dynamic behaviour as the prototype unit built, established during testing, and shown by simulation to meet the breathing system requirements under dynamic patient breathing load. Implementation of the air delivery unit within the completed prototype breathing system shows the mask pressure to fluctuate outside the desire pressure tolerance range; however, to remedy this situation, the compressor requires the development of an appropriate control scheme which is beyond the scope of this work.

    View record details
  • The TANAMI Multiwavelength Program: Dynamic SEDs of Southern Blazars

    Krauß, F; Wilms, J; Kadler, M; Ojha, R; Schulz, R; Trüstedt, J; Edwards, PG; Stevens, J; Ros, E; Baumgartner, W; Beuchert, T; Blanchard, J; Buson, S; Carpenter, B; Dauser, T; Falkner, S; Gehrels, N; Gräfe, C; Gulyaev, S; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Kreikenbohm, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Langejahn, M; Leiter, K; Lovell, JEJ; Müller, C; Natusch, T; Nesci, R; Pursimo, T; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Quick, J; Tzioumis, AK; Weston, S

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Context. Simultaneous broadband spectral and temporal studies of blazars are an important tool for investigating active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet physics. Aims. We study the spectral evolution between quiescent and flaring periods of 22 radio-loud AGN through multiepoch, quasi-simultaneous broadband spectra. For many of these sources these are the first broadband studies. Methods. We use a Bayesian block analysis of Fermi/LAT light curves to determine time ranges of constant flux for constructing quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The shapes of the resulting 81 SEDs are described by two logarithmic parabolas and a blackbody spectrum where needed. Results. The peak frequencies and luminosities agree well with the blazar sequence for low states with higher luminosity implying lower peak frequencies. This is not true for sources in high states. The γ-ray photon index in Fermi/LAT correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency in low and intermediate states. No correlation is present in high states. The black hole mass cannot be determined from the SEDs. Surprisingly, the thermal excess often found in FSRQs at optical/UV wavelengths can be described by blackbody emission and not an accretion disk spectrum. Conclusions. The so-called harder-when-brighter trend, typically seen in X-ray spectra of flaring blazars, is visible in the blazar sequence. Our results for low and intermediate states, as well as the Compton dominance, are in agreement with previous results. Black hole mass estimates using recently published parameters are in agreement with some of the more direct measurements. For two sources, estimates disagree by more than four orders of magnitude, possibly owing to boosting effects. The shapes of the thermal excess seen predominantly in flat spectrum radio quasars are inconsistent with a direct accretion disk origin.

    View record details
  • How Gambling Harms Experienced by Pacific People in New Zealand Amplify When They Are Culture-related

    Kolandai-Matchett, K; Langham, E; Bellringer, M; Ah-Honi Siitia, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pacific people in New Zealand are a minority ethnic population identified in national prevalence studies as having the highest risk of developing gambling problems. As earlier studies identified some links between culture and gambling for this population, our study aimed to deepen understanding of these links and their role in explaining the disproportionate gambling harms experienced by Pacific people. To achieve this aim we employed intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore the culture-gambling intersection for this population group. We analysed data from a subset of focus groups conducted for a broad study of gambling harms in New Zealand. The subset was selected based on the presence of individuals knowledgeable about Pacific people’s gambling behaviours, including staff from Pacific problem gambling treatment services who provided examples from a cultural perspective. We identified themes at a latent level via an interpretive process to identify underlying cultural contexts of gambling harms. Findings indicated that whilst harms experienced by Pacific people were similar to those identified amongst the general population, the cultural contexts in which some harms manifested were complex. This paper contributes to the existing knowledge base about gambling harms for Pacific people in relation to six culture-gambling intersecting themes that emerged from the data: collectivism, gift-giving, gambling-based fundraising, patriarchy, beliefs about blessings, and sports celebrities. Findings are discussed in relation to the current knowledge of gambling and conceptualisations of gambling harm within Pacific communities. Implications for culturally appropriate harm minimisation strategies and prevention interventions for this population are suggested.

    View record details
  • A Tile-based Color Picture With Hidden QR Code for Augmented Reality and Beyond

    Tran, H; Le, H; Nguyen, M; Yan, W-Q

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Most existing Augmented Reality (AR) applications use either template (picture) markers or bar-code markers to overlay computergenerated graphics on the real world surfaces. e use of template markers is computationally expensive and unreliable. On the other hand, bar-code markers display only black and white blocks; thus, they look uninteresting and uninformative. In this short paper, we describe a new way to optically hide a QR code inside a tile based colour picture. Each AR marker is built from hundreds of small tiles (just like tiling a bathroom), and the unique gaps between the tiles are used to determine the elements of the hidden QR Code. is novel type of AR marker presents not only a realistic-looking colour picture but also contains self-Correcting information (stored in QR code). In this article, we demonstrate that this tile based colour picture with hidden QR code is relatively robust under various conditions and scaling. We believe many nowadays’ AR challenges could be solved with this type of marker. AR-enabled medias could then be easily generated. For instance, it would be capable of storing and displaying virtual gures of an entire book or magazine. us, it provides a promising AR approach to be used in many di erent AR applications; and beyond, it may even replace the barcodes and QR Codes in some cases.

    View record details
  • Change in Physical Activity During Active Treatment of Cardiac Patients

    Tahana, Leon Winstone

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Sedentary secular, domestic, and recreational behaviour is a major risk factor (RF) for cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examines the quality of at-home physical activity (PA) and how it relates to physical fitness (PF) before and during 12 weeks of supervised cardiac rehabilitation (CR) in a group of medically referred cardiac patients. PA was measured with an accelerometer (ActiGraph wGT3X-BT), pre and post-CR, to determine if patient at-home PA behaviour changes during supervised CR. Cardiac patients’ (n=27), haemodynamic and morphological measurements were taken. Direct measurement of the volume of oxygen consumption (VO2peak) was done with respiratory gas analysis during a submaximal cycle ergometer test to determine PF. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to assess whether exercise-induced improvement in cardiovascular and muscular capacity (CVaM-capacity) influences the relationships between stages of PF (pre vs. post-CR) and PA behaviour. Pre-CR power output and CVaM-capacity correlated moderately with overall at-home caloric expenditure per week (r=0.47 and 0.53). Calculated r2 values indicate that power output and peak oxygen consumption contribute between 22.1% and 28.1% to the variance of weekly PA energy consumption. At-home PA behaviour (volume and intensity) changed significantly (p≤0.001) after 12 weeks of supervised CR, with moderate and vigorous PA increasing, and sedentary, and light PA decreasing. Future CR research should consider how at-home PA behaviour and other RF inter-associations affect a patient’s cardiac health and CR effectiveness.

    View record details
  • Cucker-smale Flocking Under Asynchronous Update Dynamics

    Ma, J; Lai, E

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    The effects of asynchronous updating of the state of the agents in a Cucker-Smale flocking model is considered in this paper. The study of asynchronous update is important because in practical implementations the agents typically have internal clocks that are not synchronized. We considered how asynchronous update will affect the time it takes to achieve flocking (flocking time) as well as how close the agents in the flock are moving (flock diameter). These factors were largely ignored in most previous works as achieving asymptotic convergence was their main focus. Furthermore, previous simulations typically assume that the agents move with the same speed. We considered the effects of achieving consensus of both the speed and the heading. Through computer simulations, we showed that both the flocking time and flock diameter increase significantly with asynchronicity. Results also showed that the diameter of the flock is substantially larger when the agents start with different speeds. These results should be taken into account when designing flocking agents in practice.

    View record details
  • Practices of Use

    Myers, Ruth

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Practices of Use develops self-forming practices of performative and disciplinary body acts, at home and in wider social contexts. Body/subject positionings are explored in these practices as a process of constant ‘becoming’. The phrase ‘practices of use’ encapsulates a research aim to incorporate the use-value of Michel Foucault’s ‘technologies of the self’ as well as Clark Moustakas’s heuristic methodology. The project extends and contributes to feminist enquiries (Butler, Heyes, McWhorter and McLaren), working across Foucault’s disciplinary and self-forming practices. This project’s significance lies in a set of practices that lend emphasis to subjects and contexts developing and operating relationally. This emphasis on relationality explores the subject as becoming, forming, sensing and thinking differently so as to reveal and counter normative regimes. Through private training tasks in my home Practices of Use develops a group of body acts that acknowledge and act into personal histories of the disciplined female body. These explore relational positioning in various sites such as the floor and doorways to develop modes to think myself differently. Through methods including the use of sound, moving image and sculptural material, these ‘private’ tasks both incorporate and question how I am positioned in relation to the home context. They help me act, and, in turn, act as records of processes of forming, fixing and attaching. Through these practice based performance paradigms, research questions develop about how my subjectivity is encountered. Moreover, how does this private training prepare me to continue these acts in public contexts, where my body acts are encountered in shifting contextual settings in which wider scenes, including passersby, are involved? Thus this project explores a range of the research problems encountered when personal histories of the disciplined female body in the home become viewable, publishable, or accountable in art contexts. The research builds on Judith Butler’s body acts as social and performative practice, and are further understood through Foucault’s ‘disciplinary power’ (1975) as relationally productive. A question of how knowledge is ‘attached’ to moving bodies is considered in early film technologies, and agency as a productive relational strategy, as well as ethical requests of assistance and support, are explored in art and performance.

    View record details
  • Iodine Status in European Women in New Zealand With Moderate Selenium Deficiency

    Jowitt, L; Duxbury, MD

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    For the optimal function of thyroid gland, adequate intakes of iodine and selenium are required. Since iodine is essential component of the thyroid hormones, its insufficiency leads to inadequate hormone production and further to inadequate tissue response (hypothyroidism), goitre, stillbirth and miscarriages, and growth retardation. According to the World Health Organisation the recommended median urinary iodine concentrations (UIC) are the best indicators of iodine nutrition. The WHO defines iodine sufficiency in an adult population as a median UIC of > 100 µg/L in spot urine samples. Iodine deficiency was and still is a problem in New Zealand. In September 2009 the mandatory fortification of all bread with iodized salt was introduced. Therefore, the primary aim of the study was to determine the levels of iodine in both groups, and the secondary aim of the study was to determine whether there is a relationship between selenium and iodine, and iodine and thyroid hormones in two groups of European women. Urinary iodine concentration was determined in spot samples by the new method called “Fast B”, which is improved Sandell-Kolthoff reaction. The results of the study showed the mean urinary iodine level in the control group and the group of women with the Hashimoto’s thyroiditis was 120.77± 59.35 (median UIC was128.00 µg/L), and 98.64 ± 62.83 (median UIC was 95.00 µg/L), respectively. Estimated daily iodine intake of 150µg/day was achieved in five participants in the control group, and four participants in the group of women with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis. Estimated median iodine intake in the control group and Hashimoto’s group was 142.22 and 105.55, respectively, indicating mild iodine deficiency. There was no significant relationships found between iodine and selenium, and iodine and thyroid hormones in both groups. The results of the current study are in line with the results from larger studies carried out in New Zealand. Iodine intakes appear to have improved after the mandatory fortification of bread with iodised salt in 2009, although iodine deficiency is still a problem in New Zealand. Using an iodine fortified bread clearly made an impact on the overall iodine intake but not to the expected level. There was no association found between iodine and selenium, and iodine and thyroid hormones. Any possible interaction between selenium and iodine is still unclear.

    View record details
  • Was the Supreme Court Right to Change the Law on the Right to a Speedy Trial?

    Sirota, L

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In R v Jordan, the Supreme Court of Canada held, by a 5-4 majority and over the vigorous disagreement of the concurrence, that criminal prosecutions in which a trial does not conclude by a set deadline will be presumed to breach the right to be tried within a reasonable time, protected by section 11(b) of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms. The acceptable length of proceedings set out in the decision is of 18 months from the day charges are laid for cases that proceed without a preliminary inquiry, and 30 months otherwise. The Crown can still show that exceptional circumstances outside of its control have arisen and can explain — and excuse — a case taking longer than that, but unless it does so, a stay of proceedings will be the automatic consequence of such delay. Meanwhile, an accused will be able to show that delay below these ceilings is unconstitutionally unreasonable, but only by demonstrating not only that the delay is “markedly” greater than reasonable, but also that he or she diligently sought to have the case heard sooner.

    View record details
  • Development of a New Multi-channel Electrode and Signal Processing for Surface Electromyography Signals Feature Extraction

    Kilby, Jeff

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The overall aim of the research reported in this thesis was to build a new multi-channel electrode and to investigate and develop signal processing techniques for sEMG signals, in order to enable the extractions of more useful-features. Analysis of these signal features will assist in the creation of a more effective database for diagnosing muscle ailments and conditions. The investigation was carried out by observing the fatiguing characteristics of surface electromyography (sEMG) signals collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of the quadriceps of the dominant leg of 40 healthy participants performing an endurance (or fatiguing) task of 50% of their maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC). The signals were collected using a new multi-channel electrode and analysed using an overlapping sliding window algorithm that extracted signal features of the mean frequency (MNF) and muscle fibre conduction velocity (MFCV). The new multi-channel electrode had 11 pins and each was pre-amplified with a voltage gain of 484 and bandpass filtering from 6.8 Hz to 1.02 kHz to collect monopolar signals. The monopolar signals were then configured by the software as either linear array or Laplacian configuration. A better signal definition in terms of motor unit action potential was achieved with the Laplacian configuration. This research also investigated a number of different signal processing techniques to extract features for classification purposes of sEMG signals during an endurance or fatiguing task. These included the use of Fast Fourier Transform, Short Time Fourier Transform and Wavelet Transform. Using the Fourier power spectrum, spectral features such as MNF, median frequency (MDF), and temporal features such as root mean square (RMS) and MFCV were determined. The results showed that, of all the signals analysed, the MNF and MDF values showed similar trends and the RMS values showed a linear relationship, which increased over the time period of the signal. The MFCV values meanwhile showed also a similar trend to those of MNF and MDF. The MNF feature was selected over MDF as it produced a more accurate trend line that closely correlated with the measured values. Statistical analysis was performed on all 40 participants to produce the mean values for determining the range and fatigue times, and determine how much the MNF and MFCV values dropped over the contraction time. The results showed that fatigue times for the 40 participants ranged between 41.6 to 78.8 seconds when performing 50% MVIC. The mean trend lines of the MNF and MFCV features showed a drop in values in the initial and the final fatigue stage. The initial value of MNF dropped by 20.3% of the maximum value during the first 29.8% of the contraction period. The MFCV meanwhile dropped by 20.9% of the maximum value during the first 28.2% of the contraction period. The MNF value dropped by 17.4% at the final fatigue stage whereas the MFCV value dropped by 18.1%. The findings of this research, which demonstrates new methodologies that can be used for extracting features of sEMG signals, also identify directions for future work in the field of signal classification.

    View record details
  • A Morphology-based Model for Forecasting Cooling Energy Demand of Condominium Buildings in Sri Lanka

    Geekiyanage, D; Ramachandra, T; Rotimi, JOB

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Building morphology has significant influence on operational energy demand of buildings. Energy consumption for space cooling accounts for more than 75% of electricity use in typical condominium buildings. With increase in the number of condominiums in Sri Lanka, the requirement for space cooling has increased resulting in significant energy demands. Accordingly, this study developed a morphology-based model for forecasting cooling energy demand of condominiums. The study employed a quantitative approach involving questionnaire survey and document review to collect data from thirty (30) condominiums in Sri Lanka. The correlation analysis performed on the data collected indicates that the number of floors (0.940), building height (0.930), building shape (-0.686), grouping of buildings (-0.647) window-to-wall-ration (0.597), gross internal floor area (0.489), and wall-to-floor-ratio (-0.457) have significant correlations with the cooling energy demand of condominiums in Sri Lanka. A multiple linear regression model developed shows that the number of floors and window-to-wall-ration account for 91.2% accuracy of the cooling energy estimation for condominiums in Sri Lanka. Thus, using the developed model, the annual cooling energy demand of a condominium can be forecast, considering significant design factors that could inform decisions at the building design and construction stage to ensure energy efficient designs.

    View record details
  • Drama Drones: An Investigation Into Integrating Drones Into Real World Filmmaking in New Zealand

    Cleveland, Peter

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    The use of drone technology is a topical issue for contemporary filmmaking. The fast paced innovation of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV) or drones has opened up a new realm of camera movement available to all levels of filmmakers, including the novice. This expedient growth fuelled by amateur open source development has outstripped the ability of many governments to legislate. The film industry itself has been equally slow in reacting to these new possibilities. This has resulted in advancing technologies being underutilised and has limited uptake of drone technology within dramatic film production. This research engages with these issues and explores the use of drones as a motion controlled cinematographic tool, specifically as it relates to the practice of filmmaking in New Zealand at both a novice and a professional level. A practice based methodology serves as a platform to demonstrate how to utilise advancing technologies in an original way that is consistent with the current mode of filmmaking. The outcome is evidenced by an innovative blend of open source ground control software, autopilot firmware, DIY1 crafted drone and early adoption of Real Time Kinematic GPS2 hardware. Can an innovative approach to the use of emerging creative technologies influence the way in which they are integrated into the New Zealand on-set filmmaking idiom by using drone technology to develop a proof of concept system for predictable and repeatable camera path?

    View record details
  • Investigating Market Research Ethics

    Yallop, A

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

    View record details
  • A Trauma Shake-up: Are NZ Graduates Being Prepared for the Real World?

    Barnes, M

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Young journalists today are highly likely to cover traumatic incidents early in their careers, with many confronting trauma day to day. This pressure is exacerbated in the current economic climate and fast-paced changing world of journalism. New Zealand graduates are no exception. Few are prepared by their journalism schools to deal with trauma. Should they be taught these skills during their training or should they wait until they are in the workplace? Research has recommended the former for at least two decades. Perhaps it is time New Zealand caught up with many American and Australian journalism schools and introduced changes to the journalism curricula to ensure graduates are equipped with skills to recognise signs of stress in themselves as well as victims. The workplace can support this training with recognition and support, which has been shown to improve productivity and resilience.

    View record details