10,710 results for Massey University

  • Tūhono : the United Collective : an exhibition report presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Māori Visual Arts, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Hauraki, Glenn Douglas

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This exhibition report provides a detailed outline of the pathway undertaken to complete the requirements of a Masters of Māori Visual Arts Thesis and the presentation of works Tūhono in December 2017. Tūhono explores the combination of tikanga Māori and customary techniques alongside modern and contemporary processes. The three pou whakairo were developed to align with the kaupapa Te Kore, Te Pō, and Te Ao Mārama. A range of tools and techniques, both traditional and contemporary were used to explore the medium.

    View record details
  • "Hua oranga" : A Māori measure of mental health outcomes : a report / prepared for the Ministry of Health

    Kingi, Te Kani R; Durie, Mason H

    Book
    Massey University

    View record details
  • Survival of Staphylococcus aureus during the manufacture and ripening of camembert cheese : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Food Technology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Kang, Zhetong

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Staphylococcal Food Poisoning (SFP) is the third most common cause of food poisoning internationally, caused by an enterotoxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus. S. aureus contamination in dairy products, including cheese, can lead to SFP. The survivability of S. aureus during the manufacture and ripening of Camembert cheese was the focus of this study. Camembert cheeses were manufactured using pasteurized milk inoculated with one of three S. aureus strains, comprising two reference strains ATCC 4163, ATCC 9144 and one dairy strain 172 RR. Each strain was tested in triplicate. The results showed that manufacturing and ripening of Camembert cheese reduced the risk of food safety associated with contamination with S. aureus with a 1.6 to 3.1 log reduction. The largest decrease occurred following drainage, which was particularly evident in 172 RR, and coincided with the lowest pH. The combined effect of culture blend (starter and secondary flora) activity and low pH are believed to contribute to the death of S. aureus.

    View record details
  • What to do culturally diverse middle school students value for the mathematics learning? : thesis presented in partial fulfilment for the degree of Masters of Educational Psychology, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Hill, Julia Lindgren

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Mathematics education values concern what students perceive to be worthy or of importance in mathematics, and relate specifically to learning and pedagogy (Seah & Andersson, 2015). These values take place in the context of activities and decisions that are made to enhance the learning and teaching of mathematics (Seah, 2016). This study explores the types of mathematics education values espoused by diverse middle school learners in New Zealand, focusing on a cohort of Pākehā/European, Asian, Māori and Pāsifika students. This study also examines the relationship between the students’ cultural values and what they value for their mathematics learning. The methodology used in this study involved a comparative case study to investigate student perceptions of the most and the least important mathematics education values. Using a survey format, students ranked twelve mathematics education values in order of their importance, with follow up interviews to better understand the reasoning for students ranking of certain values. The use of a range of methods provided a more holistic approach and allowed for greater diversity of student perspectives. The results demonstrated that culturally diverse middle school students shared three mathematics education values, that is utility, effort/practice and flexibility. The commonality of these mathematics education values reflects shared educational and societal values. However, students from different cultures (and from different mathematics learning environments) were found to endorse alternate values as most and least important for their mathematics learning. These mathematics education values were reflective of the students’ cultural values as identified by earlier research and policy documents (Hofstede, Hofstede, & Minkov, 2010; Ministry of Education (MoE), 2011, 2013). The Māori and Pāsifika students identified most strongly with the mathematics education values collaboration-group work and family, reflecting the collectivist cultural values of these students. Conversely, the Pākehā/European and Asian students espoused independent mathematics education values including teacher explanations and mathematical understanding/clarity, reflecting New Zealand’s individualist values, and values relating to the teacher-student power imbalances amongst many East Asian cultures. An unintended outcome of this study was the impact of classroom norms and pedagogy on students’ mathematics education values, specifically, the influence of an inquiry based classroom intervention upon the Māori and Pāsifika students’ collaborative mathematics education values. The findings from this study provide insight into what is valued by culturally diverse middle school mathematics learners. It is hoped that the results from this study may assist teachers to develop culturally responsive mathematics pedagogy which aligns with the values of their students, leading to enhanced mathematics learning outcomes for diverse middle school students.

    View record details
  • The success and value of non-formal education for sustainable development : the case of children in the Wilderness Eco-Club Programme in the Zambezi region, Southern Africa :|ba thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Environmental Management at Massey University, New Zealand

    Adams, Sarah

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Education for sustainable development (ESD) has emerged strongly in recent years to become a key mechanism for moving towards a more sustainable future. The aim of this study is to gauge the success and value of non-formal ESD using a case study approach. Children in the Wilderness (CITW), a subsidiary organisation of ecotourism operator Wilderness Safaris, offers an extracurricular ESD programme for primary school children, and their Zambezi Region operation was selected as the case study site. A qualitative research approach was taken for this study, employing data collection methods such as interviews, focus groups, observation, and the examination of national policy documents and the CITW eco-club curriculum. The CITW eco-club programme responds to UNESCO’s (2005) characteristics for ESD, particularly regarding the establishment of relationships with the wider community, and a multi-method, learner-centred approach to teaching. While the national governments in Zambia and Zimbabwe aim to respond more strongly to UNESCO’s characteristics, they are constrained by limited human and financial capital resources. The eco-club programme, however, complements the formal sector by providing teacher training and resources, demonstrating the value of the programme in providing students with a more enriching learning experience. This study concludes that the non-formal education sector provides significant support to the formal education system, leading to improved vertical integration between international guidelines and implementation at a local level. The eco-club programme enables CITW to achieve its aim and vision by focusing on prevalent issues such as poverty, deforestation, poaching, and pollution. While the scope of the research and the limited time spent in the field did not allow for a detailed examination of the eco-club programme’s influence on proenvironmental behaviour, it became clear that some pro-environmental behaviour has occurred as a result of the programme.

    View record details
  • The prevalence of nutrition risk and associated risk factors among older adults recently admitted to age-related residential care within the Waitemata District Health Board region : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics at Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand

    Hettige, Dushanka

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Background: New Zealand has a rapidly growing ageing population, aligned with the ageing population trend occurring globally. Older adults account for a significant proportion of the government health care expenditure, primarily due to higher needs for disability services and a higher level of care, such as residential care. Malnutrition is multi-factorial and may result in disability and poor health contributing to a significant decline in the independence in older adults. Internationally, previous research has found a high prevalence of malnutrition among older adults in the residential care setting. This study aims to investigate the prevalence of malnutrition and associated risk factors among older adults (aged 64 to 84 years) newly admitted to residential care facilities across the Waitemata District Health Board (WDHB) region. Methods: A cross-sectional study was undertaken among older adults newly admitted to WDHB residential care facilities. A questionnaire was used to assess participant sociodemographic and health characteristics. Anthropometric and body composition measurements were recorded. Grip strength was measured using a handgrip dynamometer and gait speed was measured by a 2.4m walk test. Nutrition risk was assessed using the Mini Nutritional Assessment- Short Form (MNASF), dysphagia risk was determined from the 10-item Eating Assessment Tool (EAT-10) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) examined cognitive function. Results: The mean age of participants was 78.7 ± 5.0 years. Of 77 participants, just under half (45.5%) were malnourished with a further 49.4% were at high nutrition risk. Over a third (37.7%) of participants were at dysphagia risk. Malnourished participants were more likely to require daily help prior to admission (p=0.011) and have a slower gait speed (p=0.014). A higher nutrition risk (lower MNA-SF score) was strongly correlated with a lower BMI (r=0.274, p=0.024), grip strength (r=0.368, p=0.001), higher dysphagia risk (r=-0.248, p=0.029) and higher medication use (r=-0.213, p=0.043). Conclusion: Nearly half the participants were malnourished, and over a third were at risk of dysphagia. This study highlights that low BMI, grip strength and higher dysphagia risk and medication use are potential risk factors for malnutrition. Findings highlight the importance of malnutrition and dysphagia screening among older adults upon admission to residential care. This will ensure appropriate diagnosis and treatment for those identified at risk.

    View record details
  • A SUPERHOME in Christchurch under winter conditions : real performance through post-occupancy evaluation : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Environmental Management at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Armiento, Bramantino

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The profile of energy-efficient, high performing, ‘sustainable’ buildings have greatly increased in recent years in response to the need for change in design, construction, and maintenance of the built environment. Residential buildings in particular have been in the spotlight when it comes to the application of ‘green’ building concept. Although it is generally understood that a ‘green’ home provides a healthier and more comfortable housing environment to its occupants aside from generating energy efficiency, little is known about the extent to which such a home actually performs while in use. In New Zealand, a nationwide industry led initiative, known as the ‘Superhome Movement’, was established to promote the designing and building of environmentally sound, healthier, more energy-efficient and overall high-performing homes known as SUPERHOMEs. This research investigated the post-occupancy performance and indoor environment quality of a SUPERHOME under winter conditions. This study incorporated the analysis of energy use, monitoring of IEQ, and the surveying of building occupants. Results suggest that (1) the study building has not achieved its design potential with regards to electricity use in the first winter that it is occupied; (2) a SUPERHOME achieves a high level of thermal performance and provides adequate IAQ in winter conditions; and, (3) occupants’ overall perceptions towards the postoccupancy and winter performance of a SUPERHOME are positive. These findings lead to a realization that the ‘green’ status of a build should not be limited to ratings by thirdparty certification.

    View record details
  • "Lasses, live up to your privileges, and stand up for your rights!" : gender equality in the Salvation Army in New Zealand, 1883-1960 : a thesis submitted to Massey University in fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in History

    Hendy, Raewyn

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis evaluates The Salvation Army’s claim that women and men had equal status in the organisation, in the light of research from elsewhere in the world that women did not have genuinely equal opportunities in the organisation. It examines the gender history of The Salvation Army in New Zealand from the time of its arrival in Dunedin in 1883 until 1960 with its primary aim being to determine the nature and extent of gender equality in the organisation during this period. In order to do this, it examines the roles, opportunities and responsibilities offered both to male and female officers; discusses how women and men were portrayed in official publications, primarily the New Zealand edition of The War Cry; and looks for both obvious and subtle signs of discrimination against women officers. It also attempts to uncover traces of the voices and stories of the women who served The Salvation Army in New Zealand. Throughout the period under investigation women officers made up a very high proportion of Salvation Army officers in New Zealand. Prior to World War One, particularly in the period from 1883 to 1900, women officers were able to participate in most aspects of the work of The Salvation Army in New Zealand, with positions appearing to be allocated on merit and availability rather than on gender. Over time however and particularly in the years from 1930 to 1960, women officers were increasingly relegated to positions in smaller corps and into roles involving the care of women and children. Married women officers were often treated as subordinate to their husbands and offered limited opportunities within the organisation. The Salvation Army increasingly conformed to, rather than challenged, the gender mores of other religious denominations and of New Zealand society more generally. Therefore, I conclude, that on balance, although there were occasionally some exceptional women, and at some points, particularly during the years prior to World War One, a degree of equality, that The Salvation Army in New Zealand largely failed to offer equality of opportunity, or equal roles, responsibilities and status to its women officers.

    View record details
  • Stakeholder perspectives of play-based learning in the first year of primary school : a case study in Aotearoa New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Educational Psychology at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Blucher, Mandie Elizabeth

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This qualitative research study explored key stakeholders’ perspectives of a play-based learning (Pb-L) approach in the first year of primary school. A case-study design was used to gather information about the perceived value, challenges, and characteristics of a Pb-L environment in an Auckland-based primary school. The children’s perspectives of the role of play were explored in six focus group interviews, while an online survey was used to collect parent or caregiver’s experiences of the current Pb-L approach. Lastly, two separate interviews were conducted with a classroom teacher and school leader to capture their experiences of implementing a play-based approach. The findings of the study indicated that children perceived self-initiated, hands-on exploration that was based on their interests, and social interaction with peers, as important in their play and learning activities. Overall, the parents, teacher, and school leader demonstrated a shared understanding of the value of a Pb-L approach, particularly in relation to the importance of child well-being and children’s social and emotional development. The study outlines the adults’ perspectives of the benefits and challenges of a play pedagogy and highlights the implications for schools/teaching practice, including potential opportunities for future research. It is proposed that a Pb-L pedagogy provides an approach to development and learning that embraces the natural playfulness with which children enter school to support meaningful early learning experiences that promote lifelong learning.

    View record details
  • Constructions of loneliness in older people in the New Zealand news and current affairs media : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology with endorsement in Health Psychology at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Bidois, Jolinda Ruth

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Loneliness is a subjective, painful, personal experience and it has negative effects on physical and mental health. The way that loneliness in older people is constructed in the mass media can reflect or influence public perceptions regarding that issue. Analysis of media reports can contribute to understanding how loneliness in older people is understood. This study is based in a social constructionist understanding and investigates the way that loneliness in older people is constructed in the New Zealand news and current affairs media. A discourse analysis was undertaken of articles regarding loneliness in older people, published in New Zealand in 2016 from selected newspapers, magazines, and a news website. Five discourses are described which are utilised in those news and current affairs articles regarding loneliness in older people. They are named the morality, economic, medical, dependence, and relational discourses. Each of these discourses has been identified in previous research. In the first four of these discourses, older people who experience loneliness are commonly offered passive subject positions of reduced power and agency, and loneliness in older people is problematised. Older people quoted in the news and current affairs articles drew on a relational discourse which, in contrast, positioned older people, including those who experienced loneliness, in interdependent relationships. A focus on the voice of older people highlights that they draw on a different discourse from others, and it is a discourse which enables more powerful and agentive subject positions for older people, especially those who experience loneliness.

    View record details
  • Neighbours at war : aggressive behaviour and spatial responsiveness in the anemone, Actinia tenebrosa : this thesis is completed in part of a Masters of Conservation Biology degree

    Balfour, Georgia

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Habitable space is precious and animals have developed a wide variety of mechanisms to acquire and defend favourable space. Aggression is considered any animal behaviour that involves actual or potential harm to another animal of either the same or different species. Agonistic behaviours must also be considered as it is any social behaviour related to fighting. Both aggressive and agnostic behaviours are observed in many animal species as resources including light exposure, nutrients and mates are often limited. Although agonistic behaviour varies among species, agonistic interactions can be partitioned into three specific types of behaviours: threat, aggression, and submission or avoidance. While any one of these behaviours can be observed in isolation, in an interaction between two animals, there is normally a sequence of behaviours which can culminate in combat. Anemones have unique adaptions such as clubs, fighting tentacles, bundles of stinging cells, sweeper tentacles and acrorhagi that allow them to defend themselves from competitors. Previous research also suggests that anemone populations are a collection of clusters of genetically similar which assemble via limited dispersal and locomotion. I chapter two I examined the effect of aggression on individuals at varying distances and predicted that those anemones that are initially located in closest proximity (<10cm. This behaviour is important to understand as it aids in fully understanding how aggressive behaviours determine dominance hierarchies and the spatial arrangement in A. tenebrosa. I chapter three, I investigated whether there was evidence for an ideal spatial arrangement of individuals in the field by testing whether individuals return to a similar spatial arrangement if randomised. The results from this chapter suggest that there is no single ideal spatial arrangement of individuals but rather individuals will find a spatial arrangement that is stable. I also observed that there appears to be an acclimation between individuals that resulted in a favourable position within the cluster. Lastly, I observed that instead of trying to return to a specific aggregation, individuals acclimate each other and move relative to those individuals surrounding them, much like stars in the sky. The results from this study would suggest that spatial structure of individuals in the field is dependent on intraspecies interactions and the recognition of individuals.

    View record details
  • Breakfast intake, habits and body composition in New Zealand European women : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Nutrition and Dietetics, Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Cullen, Elizabeth Margaret

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Background: The rise of obesity and related poor health outcomes is rampant in New Zealand. Dietary factors are key in the aetiology of obesity. One dietary factor with wide reaching implications on health and weight maintenance is breakfast consumption. Breakfast consumption has declined in New Zealand in recent years, and adverse health outcomes have risen concurrently. Breakfast consumption has been associated with lower BMI, improved appetite control, better diet quality, and more stable glycaemia. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe and compare reported and observed breakfast consumption between obese and normal weight New Zealand European women aged 18-45 years, living in Auckland, New Zealand. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, healthy women (n=75 normal BMI, n=82 obese BMI) completed a 5-day food record, an observed ad libitum buffet breakfast assessment and body composition measurements. Nutrient intake, food choices and behavioural aspects, including pace of eating and meal skipping data were obtained and analysed. Results: More normal BMI women (n=69; 84.1%) than obese BMI women (n=56; 74.6%) consumed breakfast daily. Obese BMI women consumed significantly more energy at the observed breakfast (1915 ± 868 kJ) than at the recorded breakfast (1431 ± 690kJ, p<0.001); however neither BMI group met one third of estimated energy requirements at either breakfast occasion. Carbohydrate consumption was lower than recommended (AMDR: 45-65%) in both groups in the recorded breakfast (40.7% and 42.6%; normal BMI and obese BMI respectively), whereas total fat consumption was higher than recommended (AMDR: 20-35%) (36.5% and 35.9% respectively). Protein consumption was within AMDR recommendations (15-25%) for both groups in the recorded breakfast (16.3% and 17.5%) but not in the observed breakfast, (13.0% and 14.0%), obese BMI and normal BMI respectively. Foods with the greatest contribution to energy at the observed breakfast for obese BMI women were discretionary items (fats, cake and biscuits), compared with sweetened cereals, nuts and seeds for normal BMI women. Having a faster pace of eating and consuming foods with a higher energy density significantly increased the likelihood of falling into the obese BMI category (b=3.11, p=0.016; b=1.35, p=0.042 respectively). Conclusions: Consuming a breakfast, particularly one that contains whole grains, fruits and low-fat dairy products, and minimising discretionary items could enable women to more closely meet dietary recommendations, and as a result, improve health outcomes. Key words: breakfast, obesity, energy intake, appetite, pace of eating

    View record details
  • ATR-FTIR chemometrics for biological samples : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Nanoscience at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Cleland, Josiah David

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This project has used the analytical infrared reflectance technique of Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, for the prediction of chemical components in a range of biological samples. Data collection was carried out on 40 hyperaccumulator samples, 56 chicken feed samples, 54 lamb faecal samples and 188 forage feed samples. Predictions were made using several different regression methods including: Ridge, Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO), Elastic Net, Principal Components (PCR) and Partial Least Squares (PLS). The best methods were identified as LASSO, Elastic Net and PLS. Several spectral data pre-treatments were explored, the best of which combined Standard Normal Variant scaling (SNV) with a first-order Savitzky – Golay (SG) spectral derivative and smoothing filter. Several of the resulting models illustrated high quality predictions (R2 > 0.8, Relative Performance Deviation (RPD) ≥ 2). The SNV and SG pre-treatment almost completely reduces the contribution of strong water-based signals to the regression model, allowing the possibility of in situ prediction of forage feed composition with minimal sample preparation. ATR-FTIR spectrometers are available in a hand-held form, and the results of this research suggest that in situ forage quality analysis could be performed using mid – infrared (MIR) reflectance spectroscopy.

    View record details
  • How do New Zealand teachers like to be supported by psychologists? : a thesis presented to the Institute of Education at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master in Educational Psychology

    Canning, Melissa

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Educational psychology as a profession has undergone many changes over the past few years, warranting an exploration of the current understandings of key stakeholders’ perceptions and requirements of the profession. While there have been numerous studies investigating the perceptions of teachers who are one of the main stakeholders, regarding the roles of educational psychologists, there are no empirical studies internationally, as well as locally, that have investigated how teachers want to be supported by psychologists who work in schools. This study explored how teachers in New Zealand would like to be supported by psychologists working in their schools, which can include educational, developmental and clinical psychologists, as well as their perceptions of the roles of educational psychologists in particular. The study used a mixed method qualitative research design, combining surveys with an instrumental case study approach. The first phase of the study, involved 50 teachers completing a web-based survey, while the second phase consisted of semi-structured interviews with three teachers. Key findings indicate that teachers had limited knowledge surrounding services that psychologists provided in schools. Overall they believed that psychologists working in schools took an ecological approach to their work, but their role had very rarely been explained to them. Some teachers sought the support of psychologists because they did not feel their training had sufficiently prepared them to meet the extent of needs in their classrooms. The support they wanted from psychologists was professional conversations on a range of issues concerning students, as well as professional development. Even though they identified an increased need for psychological assistance, they were not consistent in seeking this support. The findings have some key implications for the future practice of psychologists in New Zealand Schools. Among others, it highlighted the importance of increasing teachers understanding of the role of psychologists in their school, in particular, educational psychologists. The small sample size and other limitations of the study warrant that further research across primary, intermediate and secondary schools to better understand the nature of support that teachers actually want from psychologists, and if there are differences between the three sectors in the nature of support required. Findings from the study can be useful to inform and tailor the services offered by psychologists, in particular educational psychologists, to the needs of teachers.

    View record details
  • "Comic self-consciousness" : oblique approaches to the elegiac : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master in Creative Writing at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Fulton, Kim Jennifer

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis, composed of a collection of poetry and a critical essay, explores the contemporary elegiac poem. Whereas traditional elegists focused on death, contemporary elegiac poems deal with loss in a broader sense. The challenge contemporary elegiac poets take on is to engage with feeling but without veering into sentimentality. In the critical portion of this thesis, “‘Comic self-consciousness’: Oblique approaches to the elegiac,” I explore how two contemporary poets, Billy Collins and William Matthews, approach loss indirectly to evade sentimentality. Specifically, I argue that Collins and Matthews, both of whom are noted for their elegiac orientation and their use of wit, engage with loss through three strategies: the postponement of acknowledging the loss central to the poem, the use of incongruities manifesting as humour and irony, and by gaining the reader’s complicity through the use of metapoetics. In the creative portion of the thesis, “Farewell, My Lovely,” I have drawn inspiration from the strategies modelled by these two poets to engage with at times light-hearted or ironic approaches to loss—via wit, irony and at times metapoetics—to produce a collection of elegiac lyric poems that approach loss indirectly.

    View record details
  • Ghosting about : exegesis for MFA at Massey University

    Steelsmith, Mark Antony

    Thesis
    Massey University

    There are more things I have forgotten than I care to remember, yet, I go looking for them. My work uses light, sound, cardboard boxes and ghosts to help me remember. It is an exploration of memory and daydreaming whilst wandering around the urban-scape of Wellington. Memory has a disruptive influence on the architecture and spaces we occupy. Using Mark Fisher’s lost futures version of Hauntology I investigate how my memories have been tied up in a particular part of the city. I use ghosting as my framework to look through windows, peer into the past and imagine the future that never was. My mobile phone has become a note taking device as I go “ghosting those same streets”.

    View record details
  • The mietshaus in Brigitte Burmeister's novel Unter dem Namen Norma : a German microcosm : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in German at Massey University

    Single, Ruth Ellen

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Text in English with German throughout

    View record details
  • On the acoustical theory of the trumpet : is it sound? : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Mathematics at Massey University, New Zealand

    Redhead, Grant

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Newton's Second Law of Motion for one-dimensional inviscid flow of an incompressible fluid, in the absence of external forces, is often expressed in a form known as Bernoulli's equation: There are two distinct forms of Bernoulli's equation used in the system of equations which is commonly considered to describe sound production in a trumpet. The flow between the trumpeter's lips is, in the literature, assumed to be quasi-steady. From this assumption, the first term of the above Bernoulli equation is omitted, since it is then small in comparison to the other two terms. The flow within the trumpet itself is considered to consist of small fluctuations about some mean velocity and pressure. A linearized version of Bernoulli's equation (as used in the equations of linear acoustics) is then adequate to describe the flow. In this case it is the second term of the above equation which is neglected, and the first term is retained. Given that the flow between the trumpeter's lips is that same flow which enters the trumpet itself, a newcomer to the field of trumpet modelling might wonder whether the accepted model is really correct when these two distinct versions of the Bernoulli Equation are used side by side. This thesis addresses this question, and raises others that arise from a review of the standard theory of trumpet physics. The investigation comprises analytical and experimental components, as well as computational simulations. No evidence has been found to support the assumption of quasi-steady flow between the lips of a trumpeter. An alternative flow equation is proposed, and conditions given for its applicability. [NB: Mathematical/chemical formulae or equations have been omitted from the abstract due to website limitations. Please read the full text PDF file for a complete abstract.]

    View record details
  • After the philosopher's stone : aesthetic interrogations and navigations : an exegesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Fine Arts at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Sala, Nik

    Thesis
    Massey University

    “One becomes two, two becomes three, and out of the third comes the One as the fourth.” Maria Prophetessai The axiom of Maria is an alchemical percept illustrating a processual procedure across time that accords with the Jungian concept of individuation (from undifferentiated unconsciousness to unique individualised wholeness). The process concerns transformations of materialities and psychological state as movement in time. My research project is situated at a nexus between three simultaneous aims and procedures which relate to this precept; One: Art as magick, (magickal operations, in this case sigil constructions, aimed at altering psychological and material conditions under intentional application of imagination and will); Two: Art as spiritual practice and religious devotion, (a devotional orientation through art practiced on a relational line of enquiry and association via ‘theophanic’ and ‘active’ imagination’); Three: Art as a psychotherapeutic vehicle (oblique means for mending disturbed subjective conditions, generating processes and affects of integration and connectivity across an experiential and theorised fragmented subject terrain). The ‘fourth’ here is what is brought to the moment of reception and reading by a given audience. All concern alchemical transmutation as matter-mind relations; from an immersive, undifferentiated ‘one’ in relative unconsciousness, to compounding relational reflexivities of correspondence, doubling of associations, ‘two’, through to a ‘third that becomes a One as the fourth’, a ‘transcendent function’, as a held space weaving all of the varying threads and development together into a new unified configuration, co-ordinated but remaining unfixed as end and determination. Each point in this axiomatic evolution is polymorphous, yet relates to origins and concerns guiding it at the outset. Drawings, objects, materialities, substances, space, become the axes and in potentia through which this metamorphic generation takes place and manifests in form.

    View record details
  • Point and Lie Bäcklund symmetries of certain partial differential equations : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MA in Mathematics at Massey University

    Pigeon, David Leslie

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The aim of this thesis is to: (1) Explore the use of differential forms in obtaining point and contact symmetries of particular partial differential equations (PDEs) and hence their corresponding similarity solutions. [1] and [4]. (2) Explore the generalized or Lie-Bäcklund symmetries of particular PDEs with particular reference to the Korteweg-de Vries-Burgers (KdVB) equation [3]. Finding point symmetries of a PDE H = 0 with independent variables (x1,x2 ) which we take to represent space and time and dependent variable (u) means finding the transformation group that takes the variables (x1, x2, u) to the system (x´1, x´2 , u´ ) and maps solutions of H = 0 into solutions of the same equation. The form of H = 0 remains invariant. The transformation group is usually expressed in terms of its infinitesimal generator (X) where using the tensor summation convention. X can be considered as a differential vector operator with components (ξ1 , ξ2 , η) operating in a three dimensional manifold (space) with coordinates (x1 , x2 , u). The invariance of H = 0 under the transformation group is expressed in terms of a suitable prolongation or extension of X (denoted by X(pr) ) to cover the effect of the transformations on the derivatives of u in H = 0. The invariance condition for H = 0 under the action of the transformation group is (Pr) [H] = 0 whenever H = 0. We consider x1 , x2 , u and the derivatives of u to be independent variables. In practical terms, finding point symmetries of H = 0 means finding the components (ξ1 , ξ2 , η) of the infinitesimal generator (X). There are two general methods for finding ξ1 , ξ2 η. [From Introduction] [NB: Mathematical/chemical formulae or equations have been omitted from the abstract due to website limitations. Please read the full text PDF file for a complete abstract.]

    View record details