2,545 results for Unitec

  • Security in Virtual DMZ designs

    Sathu, Hira; Komosny, D.; Singh, S. (2017-07-11T00:07:18Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    Virtualization as a technology has existed for almost three decades now. By emulating physical resources, virtualization enables to utilize the full capacity of their hardware resources. Traditional physical DMZs (demilitarized zones) can be virtualized in three different ways. In this paper, the level of security of these three virtualized DMZs was compared to the level of security of traditional physical DMZs. The DMZs considered, represented a typical part of a network of an organization. A test bed was set up Using VMware ESXi 4.1 hypervisor to determine which DMZ design was the most secure. A quantitative research methodology approach was used to collect data with the help of a range of vulnerability assessment tools. Based on the research, the conclusion was drawn that all security elements, like firewalls and the inspection algorithms in the firewall, determine the level of security of a virtual DMZ and not its being physical or virtual.

    View record details
  • Why we couldn't name a degree course "A user guide to movement, sugar, sleep, and sex" and other lessons from teaching ancestral health principles

    Moran, Robert (2017-07-11T00:07:10Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Outline: 1.Need for another approach to musculoskeletal problems 2. Rationale for application of ancestral health 3. Topics and concepts in our curriculum 4. Approach to teaching – stories 5. Assessment 6. Challenges in teaching 7. Future education directions 8. Q and A

    View record details
  • A preliminary evaluation on the effectiveness of a universal school-based mindfulness intervention to enhance resilience in adolescents

    Skogstad, Eve (2017-06-06)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Background: Mindfulness in schools programs are increasing in use globally and in New Zealand. Mindfulness training is hypothesised to influence resilience as an outcome measure. Several instruments that measure resilience have been used with mindfulness research but an age specific tool has not yet been investigated. AIMS: Primarily, to evaluate adolescent resilience to establish the effectiveness of the Mindfulness in Schools Project ‘.b’ mindfulness training program taught in a New Zealand school environment. Secondly, to test the convergence validity of the Child and Youth Resilience Measure with the Ego Resilience Scale. METHOD: To investigate these aims this study used a single cohort design with pre-post measures using The Child and Youth Resilience Measure administered pre-and-post the 9-week mindfulness intervention to gauge changes in resilience. The Ego Resilience Scale was also administered post intervention to establish convergence validity with The Child Youth Resilience Measure. RESULTS: Data from 87 students were analysed with results from the Child and Youth Resilience Measure and all the subscales showed no significant change in resilience from pre-to-post the mindfulness intervention. Correlations between the Child and Youth Resilience Measure and the Ego Resilience Scale instruments (Pearson’s r=0.49, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.65, p<0.001) demonstrated good convergent validity. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study indicated that mindfulness training in a school environment taught to adolescents from an independent boys’ school had no significant effectson resilience from pre-to-post intervention. This study, however, does demonstrate good convergent validity between the Child and Youth Resilience Measure and Ego Resilience Scale, and it appears sufficiently sensitive to evaluate a mindfulness in schools training program with adolescents.

    View record details
  • A platform for analysing advanced photovoltaic energy controllers

    Ahmad, Aziz; Anderson, T.N.; Lie, T.T.; Holmes, Wayne (2017-07-11T00:07:07Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Photovoltaic (PV) based power generation technology is being pushed to the forefront as a viable alternative source of renewable energy, particularly in small scale domestic applications. In addition, there is a growing interest in incorporating storage systems with small domestic generators that are connected to the grid. However, by incorporating storage with such systems there is a need to develop controllers that allow the owners to maximize the benefit of such a system. Therefore this work introduces, and charts the development of, a virtual platform to test and analyze advanced controllers for small scale PV based power generation system. A Matlab/Simulink based model takes solar irradiation as an input and determines the power produced, taking into account all system inefficiencies including those of the buck-boost converter, AC inverter and battery charger. Moreover, the work demonstrates how the proposed platform can model any PV installation capacity using solar irradiation, temperature and power consumption data for the location of interest using a simple control strategy. It is suggested that the proposed model will significantly reduce time to develop advanced controllers for PV based power generation systems.

    View record details
  • African and African-Caribbean carers’ experience of supporting recovery in relatives with psychosis

    Pelle, J. (2017-07-11T00:06:58Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    To explore the caring experiences of African and African Caribbean carers’ of family members with schizophrenia and or bi-polar disorder, living outside in England. Epidemiology of African and African Caribbean population living in UK * Black Caribbean people make up 1.1% of the UK population * Black Africans make up 1.8% of the UK population * Impact of migration history to UK * Rates and routes of admission to in-patient units under sections of the Mental Health Act (1983)

    View record details
  • The 'call to adventure' : learner agency in the traditional school

    Gander, Timothy (2017-07-11T00:06:57Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In this presentation I will share how students in my Level 2 NCEA class and I worked together to bring more agency into the learner experience as well as my teaching practice. Through this action research project I was challenged by students to rethink my understandings of what agency is, and what this means for students in the daily learning process. As a group we co-constructed learner agency and found ways to change some of the teaching practices within our traditional school setting, with e-learning being the vehicle for this journey. The concept of learner agency has been part of ‘bigger picture’ thinking in education for quite some time. The foundations of agency transpire in the work of Dewey, Vygotsky and Piaget, as well as critical pedagogical theorists such as Freire and Illich, but has come to light recently through blogs, forums and video sites, perhaps due to the proliferation of e-learning in education. There is not much in the way of contemporary research concerning the links specifically between agency and e-learning, indicating it is still somewhat of an emerging idea. In addition, the examples we are given regarding future focused learning and innovative pedagogical practices, occur in ‘new’ institutions or well resourced schools, with forward thinking senior leaders and malleable staff. This inquiry demonstrates to educators that there are applicable methods that can allow a transformational approach to the socially constructed view of traditional teaching and learning. To initiate the action research process the students decided to set up an online learning community to share their views around agency, and to support each other in their learning journey. This proved to be instrumental in the process and supported many of the activities throughout the year, ranging from motivating the students, to allowing them to choose their own paths in the NCEA standards they studied. I gathered qualitative feedback through surveys and interviews with students, as well as through the online community, and other anecdotal evidence. I also collected quantitative data from ‘quality of learning’ surveys which have been embedded in the learning this year. E-learning became a key enabler in the data collection process. The data collection was guided by the following questions: 1) What defining factors contribute to the concept of agency? 2) What does student agency look like in the secondary classroom? 3) How can it be effectively applied in the traditional schooling system? 4) What outcomes are possible if student agency is fostered in learning? Findings from this project show how bringing agency into traditional classrooms needs to be a collaborative process which starts with hearing students’ ideas and understandings of what agency means to them, and then working with them to find ways to incorporate these ideas into a traditional learning environment.

    View record details
  • Impact of IPSec security on VoIP in different environments

    Kolahi, Samad; Mudaliar, K.; Zhang, C.; Gu, Z. (2017-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, the performance of VoIP on IPv4, IPv6 and 6in4 protocol with and without IPsec is compared. RTT (Round Trip Time), Throughput, Jitter and CPU usage are compared in VoIP networks. The results for throughput are almost same for both operating systems. CPU usage was higher on both operating systems with IPsec enabled and the results for RTT and Jitter were inconsistent. In general, the results indicated that Fedora 16 performance was better than Windows 7. The results show that although IPSec can add security, it can reduce the VoIP performance in terms of higher delay and higher CPU usage.

    View record details
  • Impact of security on bandwidth and latency in IEEE 802.11ac client-to-server WLAN

    Kolahi, Samad; Almatrook, A. A (2017-07)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    In this paper, wireless 802.11ac client-server network with open system (no security) and WPA2 (Wi-Fi Protected Access 2) security is investigated. The results shows that, by implementing WPA2 security, TCP throughput of IPv4 and IPv6 on average decreased by 16.79% and 10.22% respectively. Throughput for UDP is decreased by 18.07% and 12.99% for IPv4 and IPv6 respectively. For both IPv4 and IPv6, WPA2 wireless security implementation also increases the round trip time (RTT) and CPU Utilization for both TCP and UDP.

    View record details
  • The comparative welfare status of owned, managed stray and unmanaged strays cats

    Dale, Arnja; Salinsky, Jodi; Ladyman, Rebecca; Harvey, Laura; Jolly, S.; Leong, J.; Farrow, A.; Trippett, V.; Murphy, D.; Walker, Jessica (2017-07-11T00:06:34Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Stray cats are an extremely polarising issue in New Zealand drawing regular media attention often with reports of reduced welfare. With the aim of collecting empirical data to investigate this, we developed and validated a 5-point objective visual welfare scale comprising of a body condition score (BCS, Purinatm); coat condition; nasal &/ocular discharge; ear crusting; and injury score. This welfare scale was used in combination with a subjective Quality of Life (QoL) score to assess: managed stray cats (n=210); unmanaged stray cats (n=253); and owned cats (n=213). The BCS did not differ between owned and managed cats (p=0.68) (BSC5), but was lower (BSC3-4) for unmanaged cats (p<0.0001). Comparatively, unmanaged cats had slightly lower welfare, whilst managed and owned cats showed relatively similar welfare states.

    View record details
  • Within online corporate annual reporting for a globalised world, whose voice is being heard?

    Rolland, Deborah; O'Keefe Bazzoni, J. (2017-07-11T00:06:26Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Is there a new shareholder paradigm today that requires a new way of reporting? ( Leuner, J. 2012).The online communication of espoused organisational identity currently reflects within its message construction a rethinking of communication, space and identity reporting for globalised audiences. Within these “spaces of collective interest “ ( ibid) globalization appears to be creating new and different opportunities for organizations to communicate commitment to Non-financial reporting to their stakeholders and simultaneously, for stakeholders to assess the organisational ethics, values and achievements within Non-financial reporting. This assessment can enable organisational legitimacy to be conferred – or not. As these stakeholder audiences increase, the question of the impact of such extra-organizational influences and motivations (eg moral, ethical or other reasons) for expanded and deliberate Non-financial reporting arises. How is message construction for such reporting purposes being developed in New Zealand? This paper firstly explores the re-thinking of the role of corporate reporting and the influences on the rise of integrated non-financial reporting. Such influences include nature of stakeholder relationships or information needs as drivers for such a re-thinking (eg changing societal expectations, organisational legitimacy or the immediacy of social media spaces/ transparency). Secondly, the case of NZ Post will be outlined as a local organisation adhering to current online non-financial reporting for a globalized world. Is the voice of the annual report now encapsulated in the words of Mark Yeoman (CFO NZ Post) “an accountability document, not a marketing document?” (Yeoman,M. 2013).

    View record details
  • ‘Brave’ leadership : enabling educational innovation in the context of historical constraints

    Gasquoine, Susan; Horne, Wendy (2017-07-11T00:06:18Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In 2013 the leadership team of the Faculty of Social and Health Sciences at Unitec Institute of Technology took the decision to implement a ‘common semester’ for students beginning bachelor degree programmes in 2014. The rationale was based on New Zealand research (Boyd and Horne, 2008; Weller et al., 2011; Ingamells et al., 2013) that builds on international research (Pollard et al., 2006) supporting the education of health and social service professionals in interprofessional environments to better prepare them for the context of practice. Students of social work, nursing, medical imaging, early childhood education, sport, youth development, health promotion, natural sciences and osteopathy enrolled in the common semester for the first time beginning 2014. The four courses in the common semester provided early preparation for a career working with people and included courses in anatomy and physiology, human growth and development, people in populations and the development of human cognition. The courses were designed and delivered using a contemporary blended and flipped learning approach that supported the development of digital capability, self-managed and self-directed learning, problem solving, and scenario based interdisciplinary group work. That is, the teaching and learning model proposed to emulate the skills and capabilities required of graduates in the workplace. Analysis of the extensive feedback received on the experience of the first delivery of the common semester resulted in changes which included: • providing new students with information about how the courses will be delivered as soon as possible after programme admission • early and intensive workshops with students to enable them to engage effectively with the technology • increasing students opportunities for face-to-face engagement with academic staff, both mandatory and optional • focus for staff development on engaging with students online and programme redevelopment • increasing the relevance of course content and activities by ensuring discipline specific scenarios • closer liaison between ‘destination programmes’ and the common semester teaching team. This presentation offers the lessons learned in the implementation of a major change to the traditional way academic health professional programmes are delivered and ponders the future of these changes as the global healthcare workforce attempts to meet challenges as diverse as the aging population in the developed world and the burden of epidemics such as Ebola in the developing world. Innovative leadership making brave and at times contentious decisions is required in the education of health and care professionals to enable the visioning of a health and social care workforce that is ‘unshackled’ from the constraints of the historical expectations of academics, regulatory authorities, employers, professional bodies and the funders of programmes.

    View record details
  • Recruiting foundation and bridging learners in a digital age

    Crossan, Sue; Gandell, Robyn (2017-07-11T00:05:53Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    • Purpose of research • Literature review • Participants • Vignette • Findings • Student comments • Discussion

    View record details
  • Is blended/flipped learning culturally responsive?

    Timu, Nikki; Prescott, Annabell (2017-07-11T00:05:29Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Context ● Rationale for research ● Method ● Key Themes ○ Maori Focus Group ○ Pacific Focus Group ○ Comparison ● Conclusion

    View record details
  • Middle leadership in New Zealand secondary schools : a complex role with many challenges

    Bassett, Martin (2017-07-11T00:05:31Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Outline • Examine expectations of middle leaders • Explore challenges facing middle leaders • Strategies to support middle leaders

    View record details
  • House construction waste minimisation project Unitec

    Pivac, Andy; O'Gorman, Colin (2017-07-11T00:05:40Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Project Methodology • 4 identical re-locatable houses measured in project • 3 Bed, open plan wooden framed, iron roofed, cedar clad, • Waste stream separation by activities • Sub floor-bearers up- • Framing • Roofing and soffit • Exterior cladding and rap • Internal lining and trim • Plastics and cardboard • Sub trades Roofing, electrical plumbing, kitchen/bath fit-out

    View record details
  • From Mama Afrika to Papatūānuku : African mothers living in Auckland

    Connor, Helene; Elliott, Susan; Ayallo, Irene (2017-07-11T00:05:28Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Research with a group of ten African mothers living in Auckland • Arrived in NZ as asylum seekers, Quota refugees, skilled migrants or partners of skilled migrants • From Eritrea; Ethiopia; Burundi; the Democratic Republic of the Congo; Rwanda; Uganda; and Zimbabwe • aged between 20 and 45 years

    View record details
  • A place to stand: creating inclusive environments for diverse gender tertiary students

    Powell, Catherine (2017-08-02T14:30:02Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    A presentation by Cathie Powell on her Masters research regarding the experiences of gender diverse students in New Zealand tertiary education. Cathie covers both the types of discrimination reported by participants as well their suggestions for creating inclusive tertiary environments. ORIGINAL THESIS HERE: http://hdl.handle.net/10652/3651

    View record details
  • An elastoplastic solution for earthquake resistant rigid timber shear walls

    Loo, Wei; Quenneville, P.; Chouw, N. (2017-07-11T00:04:50Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    In terms of seismic performance, timber structures have been observed to perform well, in spite of timber being an inherently non-ductile material. This is due mainly to the ductility of the steel-to-timber connections, and the way in which they interact with the timber material. If these connections are detailed to deform plastically, while keeping the timber members elastic, the overall structure achieves ductility. For nailed sheathing-to-framing shear walls and floor diaphragms, the New Zealand structural timber code, NZS3603:1993 [1] allows ductilities of up to four to be assumed. The issue with such an approach is that in a design level earthquake, the deformations required to achieve ductility often renders the structure irreparable, or at least requiring expensive repairs. Recent developments in engineered lumber products have seen the availability of mass timber panels of tremendous strength and stiffness. These include CLT (cross laminated timber) and LVL (laminated veneer lumber) panels. Under typical loading conditions these panels are essentially rigid, and the experiments of Popovski and Karacabeyli [2] demonstrate that the hysteretic behaviour is largely governed by the plastic deformations in the steel bracket connections attaching the walls to the floor. The hysteretic loops bear some resemblance to those of sheathing to framing shear walls, the main difference being they are more tightly pinched. The seismic performance of such walls is adequate, however, damage is still a consequence after an earthquake.

    View record details
  • Generation Zero : online activism and political engagement in New Zealand

    Dodson, Giles; Papoutsaki, Evangelia; Fallas, Kristo; Greenbrook-Held, Jeremy; Serpes, Kirk (2017-07-11T00:05:05Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Generation Zero It was founded with the central purpose of providing solutions for New Zealand to cut carbon pollution through smarter transport, liveable cities & independence from fossil fuels.

    View record details
  • Looking back...thinking forward : Indigenous leadership, community engagement, dialogic space and integrated catchment management in NZ

    Dodson, Giles (2017-07-11T00:05:02Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    This paper analyses the processes community engagement and dialogue which are part of an ongoing collaborative stakeholder partnership in Northland, New Zealand. This project - the Integrated Kaipara Harbour Management Group – is a multi-stakeholder partnership, led by indigenous (Māori) groups. The project seeks to bridge several divides; adopting a large-scale ‘whole of ecosystem’ conceptual approach to understanding; addressing the environmental pressures on the Kaipara Harbour catchmentl; and integrating indigenous and western environmental management practices. As a partnership, the IKHMG is centrally concerned with the creation of deliberative and dialogic spaces through which community partnership and collaboration is formed. Primary among these dialogic spaces has been the IKHMG’s ‘flagship farm’ initiative and the community symposium, Kaipara Moana: Looking back…thinking forward, held in 2014. The central research questions that this paper addresses is: * How can community dialogue support the development of community driven integrated environmental management and bridge divides between community members, landowners, indigenous groups and environmental managers? * What processes of dialogue are effective in achieving these aims and how can community-based dialogue contribute to catchment management frameworks? The research paper is based on ethnographic engagement with the IKHMG over a six month period in 2014, including during the Community Symposium and on in-depth interviews conducted with key members of the IKHMG, including project coordinators, indigenous leaders, farmer, and environmental managers. The project critically examines this project using concepts of participatory dialogue and community participation in environmental initiatives, including the use of mātauranga Māori within environmental management and environmental policy development. The paper argues that initiatives such as community symposia are effective dialogic tools in engaging community in integrated management approaches. However, translating support into integrated environmental management practices continues to pose a serious challenge, exposing the limits to community participatory communication.

    View record details