2,654 results for Unitec

  • How can Herman and Chomsky’s ideas function in a post-communist world?

    Smith, Samantha (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This essay discusses the opportunity for Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model, as outlined in their book, Manufacturing Consent (1988), to be altered to remain relevant in a post-communist world. The model previously described five filters, which influence the US media, causing them to stray somewhat from their role as the fourth estate, and preventing them from upholding the ideals of democracy. These filters included ownership, advertising, sourcing, flak and anti-communism. But with the collapse of the Soviet Union, the threat of communism diminished and a new threat emerged. Since September 11, the war on terrorism has become a focus in the US media, creating a new hysteria. In Herman and Chomsky’s propaganda model, anti-communism can be replaced with terrorism to prolong its functionality in a post-communist world.

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  • Politics, affect and intimacy : the mediated sentencing of Metiria Turei

    Robson, Molly (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This essay shifts current discussions of political analysis from the informative to the affective, using intimacy as a conceptual lens through which to consider matters of the public sphere and their mediated repurcussions. Earlier this year, in the lead-up to the 2017 general election, Metiria Turei (the former co-leader of the Green Party) publicly admitted having committed benefit fraud in the early 1990s. Although the statement was made strategically – in the hopes of eliciting a political conversation about the failings of the welfare state – Turei was soon after met with a tsunami of vicious scrutiny from mainstream media outlets, which eventually led to her resignation as co-leader of the party. Using the Turei scandal as a case study, this essay examines the myriad functions that ‘private’ matters can have in the public realm, from the transformative to the destructive; the formative to the divisive. Robson unpacks the discursive frameworks through which Turei’s loudest critics cast their sentences, considering the ways in which they illuminate the pedagogies of privilege (whiteness, masculinity, class) that continue to overwhelm and inform ‘objective’ journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand. Ultimately, this essay showcases the vast complexities of public intimacies, inviting the reader to reflect on both the transformative potential of affective politics and the persisting power structures that continue to contort their enactment.

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  • Orchestrating film : the contrasting orchestral-compositional approaches of Bernard Herrmann and John Williams and their modern legacy

    Everingham, Matthew (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Music is one of the most powerful forces in film, and composers’ varied use of orchestration and sound is fundamental to the impact of music in this medium. From the live accompaniments of the earliest silent film, to the lush orchestrations of the ‘golden age’, to the electronic and experimental scores of the twenty-first century, the role of orchestration, timbre and sound has been pivotal to the function of music in film and its ability to shape and inform narrative, character and theme (Gorbman, 1987). In an increasingly vast and constantly evolving body of film music, two figures stand out as proponents of contrasting compositional approaches to orchestration in film: Bernard Herrmann and John Williams (Cooke, 2004). Their work reveals orchestration and compositional considerations as powerful tools that contribute to dramatic elements of narrative, character and theme. To understand these approaches their influences and contexts must be discussed (Part I). Analysing the contrasting orchestral approaches of Herrmann and Williams in their respective films The Day The Earth Stood Still (1951) and Close Encounters Of The Third Kind (1977) sheds light on the contrasting ways orchestration is approached to influence dramatic elements in film (Part II). It is important to examine the legacy of Herrmann and Williams’ contrasting approaches in more recent film music such as the representative scores of Thomas Newman (Wall-E (Stanton, 2008)) and Stephen Price (Gravity, (Cuarun, 2013)) to fully examine the role of orchestration in film today (Part III).

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  • End-of-life care needs of people dying from stroke in Australia, New Zealand and Singapore : a space for palliative care

    O'Connor, M.; Beattie, J.; Hong, E.; McKechnie, R.; Lee, K. (2017-07-11T00:12:46Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    AIMS: 1. Investigate the illness pathway of people dying of stroke in Singapore, New Zealand and Australia; and 2. Undertake a comparison of the needs of people dying of stroke between these countries. METHODS: A pilot retrospective medical record review was conducted with patients who died of stroke aged 18 years and over during 2008 to 2011 within acute care hospitals in Australia (n=10), New Zealand (n=10) and Singapore (n=7). This sample was designed to identify significant issues in the treatment and care of people who die of stroke, and will be used to inform a larger study. Sites chosen represented the key hospital for the treatment of people with stroke for a population of 200,000. Medical record data were collected using an agreed template and concerns of patients, relatives and health professionals were also extracted. One researcher led the analysis, which included descriptive statistics and thematic analysis. Electronic and telephone discussions between researchers ensured consistency of data. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The majority of patients in Australia and New Zealand were transferred to stroke wards for care; those in Singapore were transferred to intensive care and lived longer. A stroke care pathway was followed in all countries, with a palliation pathway identified in two records (Australia and New Zealand). Palliative care was documented in the majority of Australian and New Zealand records. Concerns related to impaired consciousness and deterioration in patients’ conditions. There was a lack of documented advance care plans and care directives; where present, staff had difficulty following them. Palliative care referral could make a difference to these patients and families. CONCLUSION: Stroke happens suddenly. Time to death is often short. This pilot indicates there is space for palliative care in the management of stroke patients to assist in end-of-life decision-making and symptom management. A larger study on this issue is justified

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  • Invasion success of a scarab beetle within its native range: host range expansion versus host-shift

    Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Boyer, Stephane; De Romans, S.; ArmstrongGlare, T. R.; Armstrong, K.; Worner, S. (2017-07-11T00:12:50Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Only recently has it been formally acknowledged that native species can occasionally reach the status of `pest' or `invasive species' within their own native range. The study of such species has potential to help unravel fundamental aspects of biological invasions. A good model for such a study is the New Zealand native scarab beetle, Costelytra zealandica (White), which even in the presence of its natural enemies has become invasive in exotic pastures throughout the country. Because C. zealandica still occurs widely within its native habitat, we hypothesised that this species has only undergone a host range expansion (ability to use equally both an ancestral and new host) onto exotic hosts rather than a host shift (loss of fitness on the ancestral host in comparison to the new host). Moreover, this host range expansion could be one of the main drivers of its invasion success. In this study, we investigated the fitness response of populations of C. zealandica from native and exotic flora, to several feeding treatments comprising its main exotic host plant as well as one of its ancestral hosts. Our results suggest that our initial hypothesis was incorrect and that C. zealandica populations occurring in exotic pastures have experienced a host-shift rather than simply a host-range expansion. This finding suggests that an exotic plant introduction can facilitate the evolution of a distinct native host-race, a phenomenon often used as evidence for speciation in phytophagous insects and which may have been instrumental to the invasion success of C. zealandica

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  • The PGI enzyme system and fitness response to temperature as a measure of environmental tolerance in an invasive species

    Lefort, Marie-Caroline; Brown, S.D.J.; Boyer, Stephane; Worner, S.P.; Armstrong, K. (2017-07-11T00:12:51Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    In the field of invasion ecology, the determination of a species’ environmental tolerance, is a key parameter in the prediction of its potential distribution, particularly in the context of global warming. In poikilothermic species such as insects, temperature is often considered the most important abiotic factor that affects numerous life-history and fitness traits through its effect on metabolic rate. Therefore the response of an insect to challenging temperatures may provide keyinformation as to its climatic and therefore spatial distribution. Variation in the phosphoglucose-6-isomerase (PGI) metabolic enzyme-system has been proposed in some insects to underlie their relative fitness, and is recognised as a key enzyme in their thermal adaptation. However, in this context it has not been considered as a potential mechanism contributing to a species invasive cability. The present study aimed to compare the thermal tolerance of an invasive scarabaeid beetle, Costelytra zealandica (White) with that of the closely related, and in part sympatrically occurring, congeneric non-invasive species C. brunneum (Broun), and to consider whether any correlation with particular PGI genotypes was apparent. Third instar larvae of each species were exposed to one of three different temperatures (10, 15 and 20C) over six weeks and their fitness (survival and growth rate) measured and PGI phenotyping performed via cellulose acetate electrophoresis. No consistent relationship between PGI genotypes and fitness was detected, suggesting that PGI may not be contributing to the invasion success and pest status of C. zealandica

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  • Managing tensions in academic writing for foundation learners

    Crossan, Sue; Jacka, Susie (2017-07-11T00:13:15Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper presents an analysis of a professional development initiative to promote sustainable literacy initiatives in our institution (Piggot - Irvine et al., 2010). We undertook an action research project to examine the effectiveness of our teaching of a writing assessment in two different semester cohorts. Academic Study Skills for Nursing aimed to help students seeking entry into a nursing programme to develop the necessary strategies and tools for managing academic study at degree level. However ,it was our experience that our students do not seamlessly receive the skills our course was initially designed to teach. This paper outlines literature relating to writing in higher education and compares the results of two cohorts, one receiving instruction from a study skills/academic socialisation perspective and another receiving instruction from an academic literacies perspective that explicitly acknowledges the tensions students must learn to manage in academic writing. Changes made to our teaching of a report writing assessment followed an academic literacies perspective that views writing as a process of meaning - making and the contestation around meaning, rather than learning compartmentalised skills (Carstens , 2012, p. 12 ). [The opinions expressed are those of the paper author(s) and not the New Zealand Journal of Teachers ’ Work] Our findings challenge a normative discourse of literacy acquisition that privileges a technical and linear model which positions non-traditional students’ literacy ractices as deficit (Coleman, 2009).

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  • Evocations of the other : treatments of the exotic and the feminine in nineteenth-century music - The redemption of Sheherazade

    Venter, Luka (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The concert hall, as much as the operatic stage, is a theatre – a place for viewing, and the observation of narratives. Music can be and often is read as the latter, whether overtly programmatic or not, and though abstracted through the intermediation of instruments, the orchestral and operatic literatures of Western art music enact and present narratives and struggles of power. Classical music has been dominated since its inception by men, working in a historically white European context, with the result of an almost total exclusion of the first-person perspectives of women and non-white ethnic and cultural identities. This fact, coupled with an intense historical fixation with the Orient within Western classical music, transforms the concert hall and operatic stages into extra-artistic theatres where the material presented can be read as representative of Western societal trends, attitudes and prejudices. This research draws connections between colonialist and patriarchal thought and musical representations of the ethnic and/or female ‘Other’ in the Western canon, and traces the use of certain musical TOPOI in conjunction with female and ethnic tropes. I examine these with reference to works ranging from Rameau, Saint-Saëns, and Strauss, among others, with a particular emphasis on the operatic and orchestral works of Rimsky-Korsakov, inquiring into the possibility of subverting Orientalist and misogynist elements within such musical works from a socially critical perspective. I will argue that classical music, rather than existing as a purely sonic artefact, becomes representational, on the stages of the concert hall or operatic theatre, of power struggles and of imbalances of power between men and women, and between white and non-white ethnic and cultural identities. I will do so in an attempt at communicating a vital understanding of classical music as a cultural object that ties into lived socio-political realities.

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  • Local Nazis in your area : public shaming and communal disgust in the doxing of white nationalists at Charlottesville

    Hawkes, Rebecca (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Eagerness to ‘name and shame’ neo-Nazis after alt-right violence and intimidation at the ‘Unite the Right’ rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, has revitalised the ethical debate over the practice of ‘doxing’ (dropping documents) to publicly shame previously unidentified white nationalists. Drawing on Sara Ahmed’s politics of emotion to analyse the affective politics of doxing as a weaponised form of public shaming and expression of personal disgust raises urgent questions about the effects and ethics of doxing as an activist practice and form of cyber-harrassment. ["Doxing – the intentional, non-consensual, public online release of personal identifying information about an individual, “often with the intent to humiliate, threaten, intimidate, or punish” – has become an established means of public shaming and credibility delegitimisation in the internet era"]

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  • My female body

    Walker, Holly (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Before I learnt about my feminism, I thought I was just loud and sexually confident. In 2017 I am still loud and sexually confident, but I also have research and embodied experiences to justify this. Understand this. With a growing understanding of my feminist whakapapa from Audre Lorde to My Mother, and the richness of knowledge they have left for us, I want to share, I want to be loud, I want to talk about sex, I want to talk about personal politics and how it honestly feels, not how it is supposed to feel. This may seem over-emotional, and it is. I over-react because just acting isn’t enough for me. I’m over-emotional because emotional without questioning my feelings doesn’t satisfy me. I write to understand my space and more than that, who I am within that space. Stripping back false constructions and ideals that have become ritual conformity to reveal, relearn, reverse and find an authentic sense of my identity.

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  • Xala (1975) : a close textual analysis

    Scott, Georgia (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Xala (1975), a significant film for African cinema, directed by Ousmane Sembene, is a comedic dramatisation of events following Senegal’s (then recent) independence. Sembene focuses two hours of screen time on despising El Hadji, a greedy, corrupt Senegalese businessman involved with unjust negotiations besieging the new government, and his inelegant downfall after being unknowingly cursed with erectile dysfunction by the underprivileged he steps over daily. To retain the status which comes with a Mercedes, three wives and suspect business deals, and to have the ‘Xala’ (curse of impotence) removed, El Hadji must jump through many hoops while the audience grimaces in secondary embarrassment on his behalf. Influenced by both French and African filmmaking styles, Sembene weaves a range of significant signs and symbols into the frame to convey key ideas. Visual poetics, unlike dialogue, speak across language barriers and allow Sembene’s film to reach a wider audience. Whether the viewer enagages with Sembene’s semiotics or uses cultural familiarity to understand these key ideas, a similar conclusion can be reached.

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  • Creating interspaces for live octophonic spatialisation of sound

    Austin-Stewart, Jesse (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This essay will detail the process and creation of elle – an octophonic drone interface for the CMPO 381 – Interface Design for Live Electronics paper at Victoria University of Wellington. elle – an octophonic drone interface is a 2-channel hardware interface that enables users to control an 8-channel MaxMSP patch, of the same name, with which one can create continuous drones by dropping any audio sample into the patch. These drones can then be spatialised within an octophonic array. The hardware and MaxMSP interface interact with one another to enable aural and visual feedback of the physical changes input by the user. It is designed as a simple interface to use, so that the knowledge barrier to entry is small. Cover photograph: elle - an octophonic drone interface by Jesse Austin, hardware interface.

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  • Post-modern Westerns and the endangered woman

    Parker, Hamish (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This research essay explores the increasing scarcity of female roles in post-modern western films due to changes that have occurred over several decades since the origination of the genre. A string of highly-acclaimed post-modern western films of the twenty-first century have an absence of major female characters, the cause of which stems from the way the genre has progressed since its inception. Classic westerns of the twentieth century had explicit representations of society and straightforward (albeit archaic) gender roles, each functioning in a direct manner to fulfil the plot, but as the genre has changed over several decades so has the representation of society, which has directly impacted the already limited female character. By understanding genre conventions of traditional twentieth-century western films, and then looking at how the representation of society has changed in certain post-modern westerns of the twentyfirst century, a link between the representation of society and the representation of women will be established, to understand what the female character means thematically to each film and why her role has become increasingly endangered in the genre.

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  • Examining sex and climaxes in Blue is the Warmest Colour and Carol

    Wheeler, Kerri-Lynn (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This essay uses the films Blue is the Warmest Colour (Kechiche, 2013), and Carol (Haynes, 2015) to examine the challenges and questions which arise when a male filmmaker directs a film with a queer female relationship at its centre. Whenever a male creator has authorial power over queer female subjects their authenticity comes into question. This is especially notable in the critical response to Blue is the Warmest Colour’s explicit sex scenes. Carol , however, was seen as a more authentic representation as it does not eroticise its characters to the same extent. This essay uses textual analysis of the films’ climaxes and sex scenes to contrast the way in which the two relationships are represented. It also draws on feminist film scholarship. Through this, it becomes clear that it is possible for a male filmmaker to represent queer female relationships in a way which can be perceived as authentic. However, a film’s sex scene will inevitably be read in the context of the filmmaker’s gender and sexuality.

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  • Post-colonial New Zealand cinema : Gothic aesthetics and the repression of Pākehā violence in New Zealand in Fantail

    Lynch, Caitlin (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Fantail (2013), written by Sophie Henderson and directed by Curtis Vowell, has not yet received scholarly attention for its relationship to several dominant trends in New Zealand cinema. This essay examines Fantail’s protagonist Tania as a new articulation of the gothic Pākehā woman in identity crisis, a trope embodied in films such as The Piano (Jane Campion, 1993). Through Tania, Fantail acknowledges the harmful consequences of Pākehā repression of colonial violence, ignorance of Māori historical disenfranchisement and eroticisation and appropriation of Māori culture. This reading models how gothic aesthetics, adaptations of past tropes, and restricted narrative subjectivity can function within film as tools of critique, allowing Fantail to simultaneously perpetuate and criticise dominant representational trends in New Zealand’s national cinema.

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  • File to factory : a case study of automated prefabrication house-building methods for small-to-medium enterprises

    Patel, Yusef (2017-12-23)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The Eco-Digital Fabrication (EDFAB) research project aimed to investigate how automated prefabrication technologies and off-the-shelf construction products can be employed to disrupt building industry norms. The aim of this research – conducted at the University of Auckland and Unitec Institute of Technology from 2014 onward – was to provide small-to-medium enterprises in the construction industry with a pathway to upskill and increase construction productivity through the use of these processes. The availability of automated machines and easy-to-use fabrication software is increasing dramatically and this can be paired with readily-available construction products to produce novel mass-customised housing solutions. The research project aimed to generate discussion and provide recommendations on how the construction industry might support the adoption of automated prefabrication technology in small-to-medium enterprise. This paper is a longer version of a Building Better Homes Towns and Cities National Science Challenge think-piece commissioned by BRANZ for publication in early 2018.

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  • PŪRĀTOKE : Journal of Undergraduate Research in the Creative Arts and Industries. Pilot issue.

    Wilson, Scott; Holloway, Samuel (2017-12-21)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Pūrātoke is an online, peer-reviewed journal, dedicated to the publication of high-quality undergraduate student research within the creative arts and industries. This pilot issue features the work of eleven emerging researchers on subjects as diverse as post-colonial New Zealand cinema, Senegalese director Ousmane Sembène’s film Xala, post-modern Westerns, sound spatialisation, Sex and climaxes in the films Blue is the Warmest Colour and Carol, the doxing of white nationalists after Charlottesville riots, the female body and performance art online, treatments of the exotic and the feminine in nineteenth-century music, the contrasting orchestral-compositional approaches of film composers Bernard Herrmann and John Williams, the mediated sentencing of Metiria Turei, and Herman and Chomsky’s ideas in a post-communist world.

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  • Achieving gender equality in diasaster management : a case study of integrating women into community groups in Indonesia

    Carvalhol, Ashley (2017-12-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The recent international commitment to the United Nations 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SGDs) continues to recognise the need for the international development community to focus on achieving gender equality on a local and global scale. The SDGs invite the academic community to once again ask themselves about the practices that are currently in place in order to best provide equal opportunities for men and women. It is apparent that, currently, men continue to be privileged over women. However, the growing acknowledgment that gender equality is key to achieving other developmental goals provides a great platform to improve the current policies and practices used around the world. This paper will focus on the role that women can play in management of a disaster. With a case study in Indonesia, a country very prone to natural disasters, this paper explores how involving women in decision-making roles leads to an increase in overall community resilience in the face of future disasters. Furthermore, this paper will conclude that there is a great need for communities to recognise the invaluable role that women can play in building community sustainability during disaster preparation and response.

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  • Community development in local food solutions

    Stansfield, John; Frankland-Hutchinson, Amber (2017-12-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Food security and food provenance are becoming topical issues in a globalised food market and a climate-insecure world. New forms of accessing food are emerging and forgotten forms being rediscovered, disrupting increasingly monopolistic commercial markets. Within this, ‘local food’ solutions have gained currency as consumers seek a range of satisfactions beyond price and nutrition. Little has been written on these solutions in the New Zealand context and this paper draws extensively on international literature. Here we examine several models of local food solutions and their relationship to community development. We follow the fortunes of roadside fruit tree planting on Waiheke Island, the varied levels of support or hindrance from local government and its impact on community practice. We report briefly on the results of our questioning and reflect on the expressive nature of community planting, its place in community building and impact on relationships with local government. A report commissioned by the Waiheke Resources Trust under the ITP Metro research voucher scheme.

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  • State housing in Aotearoa New Zealand : what future after National?

    Johnson, Alan (2017-12-13)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    New Zealand’s National-led government (2008 to 2017) made no secret of its plans to downsize the state’s housing stock. This downsizing is being achieved through demolitions, transfers and sales. It all started quietly in 2011 when the number of state tenancies peaked at 69,700. By mid-2015 this number had diminished by almost 2,500 units and is set to fall even further with various transfers now underway. The most notable of these transfers was on March 31st 2016 when 2800 state units in Auckland’s inner eastern suburbs were given to the Tāmaki Redevelopment Company – a public sector development agency jointly owned by the Government and Auckland Council. Further transfers of 1124 units in Tauranga and 348 units in Invercargill are underway at the time of writing, and it is expected that these will go to NGO- or iwi-based housing agencies backed by private capital interests. These private capital interests include John Laing Infrastructure Fund, Brookfields Global Integrated Solutions, Morrison & Co, and Trust House Ltd (New Zealand Treasury, 2016). Treasury suggests that by the end of 2017 the state will own just 60,000 rental units (New Zealand Treasury, 2015). This suggests that a further 3000 units are due to be transferred or otherwise disposed of over the next 18 months, and it appears most likely that these will be in Auckland, Wellington or Christchurch (New Zealand Treasury, 2015). While the then government

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