14,076 results for University of Canterbury Library

  • The changing agricultural geography of Southland, 1878-1940.

    Kellaway, Roger George (1970)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The evolution of the agricultural system of Southland was a long-term process. It has roots that stretch back to Britain before the agricultural revolution and it has not yet ended. Indeed, it probably will never end because agricultural systems are dynamic entities. The aim of this work bas been to consider the manner in which the agricultural geography of Southland has reacted to the changes that have taken place in the profitability ot various forms ot agricultural production, the introduction of new types of agricultural technology, and the impact of new modes of transport.

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  • Putting the real back into realistic job preview : an analysis of realistic job preview method and function.

    Atkinson, Caroline Leigh (1993)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Realistic Job Previews (RJP's) have developed out of a requirement for some form of voluntary turnover intervention. Most of the literature examines the processes which mediate RJP effectiveness but has recently begun to investigate the contents of RJP's and the methods of presenting them. As much of the research has been characterised by inconsistent results, this study hypothesises that a closer examination of the methods of presenting RJP's will assist in clarifying some of the unresolved issues. Intensional Simulation (Roleplay) method is proposed as a more suitable format for RJP presentation than either brochure or audio-visual RJP's. Sixty stage one psychology students were placed in one of three preview groups: brochure, video or roleplay. After the presentation of the preview, subjects were required to complete a small test and questionnaire, and to participate in a short interview. The roleplay method was found to be more realistic overall than the brochure format, contain a greater amount of information and be more personally relevant to the subjects. There was no support for the hypotheses suggesting that, compared to other methods, roleplay subjects would retain more information from the preview, make fewer job acceptance decisions and be more likely to change any decision to accept a job offer. These results are examined in light of previous RJP research and discussed in relation to the current employment climate in New Zealand. The limitations of this research are noted, along with a discussion of its practical implications.

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  • The electronic word-of-mouth effects of review valence, review volume, and product type on consumer purchase behaviour.

    Wallace, Chloe Suzanne (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis aims to examine the mediating role of product type (i.e., product-luxury perceptions) on consumer response to online reviews and the subsequent effect on purchase behaviour. Specifically, this thesis explicates the influence of review valence and review volume in shaping the consumers’ product evaluation, which in turn affects their purchase intentions for the focal product. An experimental design is adopted for this research. To examine the possible effects of product type and online reviews on consumer response, an online experiment based on a review website platform is conducted, using a 2×2×3 between-subjects factorial design. In the experiment, participants were exposed to one of twelve conditions involving the manipulation of the three independent variables (review valence, review volume and product type). A total of 432 participants were included in the final analyses, which were recruited via online convenience sampling on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. Factorial ANCOVA analysis was conducted to test the hypothesised relationships. The results indicated three interaction effects between review valence, review volume and product type on consumer decision-making. A two-way interaction effect of review valence and product type, confirmed that product type mediates the influence of review valence on product attitude, product evaluation and purchase intent. Results also indicated that luxury products are less susceptible to the influence of review valence, which equates to lower purchase intentions than the non-luxury counterpart when exposed to positive reviews. A recurrent main effect of review valence was present, with results indicating a negativity bias on the perceived informative value and persuasiveness of online reviews, which was also salient in information adoption. Review volume had one main effect and tended to emerge as significant through mediating variables. Moreover, product type elicited a main effect for six dependent measures. Product involvement, susceptibility to interpersonal influence (i.e., social learning and social belonging) and materialism were found to have exogenous effects (covariates). The managerial and theoretical implications are discussed for this research, along with suggested directions for future research.

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  • Point dose measurements in VMAT : an investigation of detector choice and plan complexity.

    Goodwin, Daniel Phillip (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Purpose: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is an intensity modulated radiation therapy technique which can achieve highly conformal dose delivery through dynamic variation of dose rate, gantry speed, and multileaf collimator positions. Due to the complexity of treatment delivery, patient specific quality assurance (QA) is required to ensure agreement between calculated and delivered dose. Point dose measurements are a well established patient specific QA technique for VMAT. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between plan complexity and the agreement between measured and calculated point doses. The suitability of five different detectors for VMAT point dose measurements was also evaluated. Methods: 45 previously treated prostate VMAT plans were selected for the study. Isocentre point dose measurements were carried out on a Varian iX linear accelerator using five commercial detectors in the CIRS Model 009 Cube 20 phantom. Measurements were made with IBA CC01 and CC04 compact ionisation chambers, IBA EFD3G and PFD3G diodes, and a PTW 60019 microDiamiond detector. Detector measurement repeatability was investigated and quantified by repeat measurements over three measurement sessions. The calculated dose was computed in both Pinnacle, using both 4 degree and 2 degree per control point gantry spacing (GS), and RayStation treatment planning systems. The agreement between measured and calculated dose was evaluated for each detector and calculation algorithm. A selection of established and novel aperture complexity metrics were calculated for the plan cohort. Correlations between complexity metrics and point dose discrepancy results were investigated. Results: A statistically significant difference in mean measured dose between the CC04 chamber and all other detectors was found at the 95% confidence level. The between measurement sessions standard deviation was less than 0.5% of mean measured dose for all detectors excluding the PFD3G. The CC01 achieved the greatest repeatability followed by the CC04, EFD3G, microDiamond, and PFD3G. A statistically significant difference in mean calculated dose was found for Pinnacle (both 4 and 2 degree GS) and RayStation calculation algorithms. For both 2 degree and 4 degree GS the mean point dose discrepancy is less than 0.55% for all detectors. Statistically significant linear relationships were found, with weak to moderate strength Pearson correlation coefficients, for the following established complexity metrics MCSv, PI, PM, CAS, CLS, and MAD metrics. The strongest Pearson correlation coefficient, r = 0.407, was found for the PI metric with CC04 measured and Pinnacle 2 degree GS calculated dose. Evaluation of plan complexity in progressively smaller ROI centred on the dose measurement and calculation point increases the correlation strength for some complexity metrics. Conclusion: Both the choice of a dose calculation algorithm and detector have a significant influence on point dose discrepancy results. Consequently, the strength of correlations between complexity metrics and point dose discrepancy is algorithm and detector specific. Therefore, the utility of individual complexity metrics to identify plans likely to fail QA will be department specific. The poor correlation strength of complexity metrics with point dose discrepancy results limits their clinical usefulness in identification of plans likely to fail QA.

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  • Family language policy in refugee-background communities: Towards a model of language management and practices

    Revis, Melanie (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    As interest in the field of family language policy is burgeoning, an invitation has been issued to include more diverse families and language constellations. This article responds by presenting family language management data from Ethiopian and Colombian refugee families living in New Zealand. As part of the researcher’s ethnographic involvement in both communities, data was obtained through participant observations, interviews with parents and children, and recordings of naturally-occurring interactions between family members. Findings from both communities differ greatly: While many Ethiopian families used explicit management for their children to speak Amharic in the home, Colombian families tended to prefer laissez-faire policies as they did not direct their children’s language choice. Nevertheless, their children typically spoke Spanish, their heritage language. As a theoretical contribution, a model is developed to coherently present the caregivers' choice of language management and their children’s typical language practices. This model helps to uncover similarities and dissimilarities across families and communities. Since families typically moved through different management and practice constellations over time, the model also assists in identifying recurrent family language policy trajectories. The article concludes by drawing practical attention to the need and best timing for informing recent refugees about options and resources concerning intergenerational language transmission.

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  • 'Ageism' in personnel selection.

    Sewell, Christine A. (1988)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The present research involved two independent studies. The first study looked at "ageism" or age discrimination in selection interviews. The effects of applicant age, information exposure and job status were examined in the interview. The specific research question addressed was whether exposure to information about successful older workers would reduce discrimination against older employees in interview settings. This study was carried out with a sample of 61 managers. Prior to !Ylaking selection decisions about a young applicant (25 years old) or an older applicant (48 years old), subjects read an article which contained either age-related information or neutral information. The age-related information was designed to mitigate against age bias. Videotaped job interviews were then viewed by the subjects who were required to make job performance evaluations and hire decisions about the applicant. Evidence of ageism against the old applicant was found. However as predicted, managers exposed to the age-related information gave significantly more favourable evaluations to the old applicant and were more willing to hire him than the young applicant. The second study addressed a very current research concern - the generalisability of findings in selection research using student samples to managerial samples. The same methodology was repeated with a sample of 119 undergraduate students. The results showed significant differences in students' selection decisions. The students exposed to age-related information gave more favourable ratings to the young applicant, and were not willing to hire the old applicant. The implications of these results are discussed.

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  • Social networks, identity and contexts : a narrative ethnography of a group of College English (CE) teachers’ social learning process amid the research discourse.

    Zeng, Wei (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This research is a narrative ethnography about a group of College English (CE) teachers working at a university in China. As one of them, I, together with my CE colleagues, lived and told our stories of dealing with the increasing research demand from the workplace. I sought to explore how our workplace mediated the social process of our learning during educational change. The research is conceptualized within the theoretical framework of community of practice and draws on social network perspective. It also adopts a poststructuralist perspective to present the dynamic socio-cultural process of how these teachers experienced and made meaning of various discourses about their teaching, researching and personal lives. The discourses from the workplace, the social context and teachers themselves make these CE teachers’ social networks and identities a site of ambivalence and struggles. Entrenched in a lower-status department, CE teachers struggled with various meanings of knowledge: the officially-valued research, the teaching-research, linguistics/western literature research, non-linguistics/western literature research, quantitative research and qualitative research. They also grappled with competing duties from both the workplace and the family. The research delves into CE teachers’ lived experiences, offering implications for enhancing CE teachers’ learning as well as international understanding of academics who might experience similar educational change. Finally, the study contributes to advancement of social learning theories, in particular, the theory of community of practice and social network theories.

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  • Shake table test a structure retrofitted using 2-4 Direction Displacement Dependent (D3) viscous dampers

    Hazaveh NK; Rad AA; Rodgers GC; Chase JG; Pampanin S; Ma Q (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Many seismic codes are modified to represent increased hazard or performance expectations of structures. According to the new code, many structures require retrofit to meet these increase performance expectations. Fluid viscous dampers can add energy dissipation without requiring major structural modification. However, their addition can lead to substantial increases in the maximum base shear and column axial forces in non-linear structures. In practice, these increases in demand would likely require strengthening of the columns and the foundations, thus increasing cost and reducing the ease and potential impact of this approach. In contrast, the 2-4 configuration of a passive Direction and Displacement Dependent (D3) damper provides damping in only quadrants 2 and 4 of the force-displacement response plot, thus substantially reducing peak base shear loads compared to a conventional viscous damper. The paper looks at the seismic performance of a 1/2 scale, two storey steel frame building that is retrofitted with the passive 2-4 D3 damper subjected to uni-directional shake table testing. Performance in mitigating structural response and foundation demand are assessed by evaluating base shear, maximum drift and acceleration. The overall results show that simultaneous reductions in displacement, base-shear and acceleration demand are only available with the 2–4 D3 viscous device. This device is entirely passive, and provides unique retrofit opportunity that does not require strengthening of the columns and the foundations.

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  • Māori values, care and compassion in organisations: a research strategy

    Love TR (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    While significant attention has been given to theorising care and compassion in workplaces, much of the research on Māori (Indigenous New Zealand) values in organisations (MVO) and their relationship with well-being cannot be considered theory-work or theory-building. In this paper I offer a new research strategy for MVO research where a passion for expressing Māori voices in empirical descriptions has outperformed theorisation.

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  • Do Sheep Make Good Humans?

    Armstrong PC (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    My paper will begin with a (very) brief historical survey of the well-known tradition – that of primatology – by which Western science has used apes and monkeys to define and refine its understanding of Homo sapiens. I will then describe a less familiar, and interestingly different, tradition that takes the study of sheep as a means to draw reflect on the nature and culture of human beings.

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  • Mana, Māori (Indigenous New Zealand) and critical studies of management in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Love TR (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Post Seismic Capacity of Damaged and Repaired Reinforced Concrete Plastic Hinges Extracted from a Real Building

    Cuevas A; Pampanin S (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents preliminary results of an experimental campaign on three beam-column joint subassemblies extracted from a 22-storey reinforced concrete frame building constructed in late 1980s at the Christchurch’s Central Business District (CBD) area, damaged and demolished after the 2010-2011 Canterbury earthquakes sequence (CES). The building was designed following capacity design principles. Column sway (i.e., soft storey) mechanisms were avoided, and the beams were provided with plastic hinge relocation details at both beam-ends, aiming at developing plastic hinges away from the column faces. The specimens were tested under quasi-static cyclic displacement controlled lateral loading. One of the specimens, showing no visible residual cracks was cyclically tested in its as-is condition. The other two specimens which showed residual cracks varying between hairline and 1.0mm in width, were subjected to cyclic loading to simulate cracking patterns consistent with what can be considered moderate damage. The cracked specimens were then repaired with an epoxy injection technique and subsequently retested until reaching failure. The epoxy injection techniques demonstrated to be quite efficient in partly, although not fully, restoring the energy dissipation capacities of the damaged specimens at all beam rotation levels. The stiffness was partly restored within the elastic range and almost fully restored after the onset of nonlinear behaviour.

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  • The once and future cathedral

    Allan, Patricia Ann (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This is an ethnographic case study, tracking the course of arguments about the future of a city’s central iconic building, damaged following a major earthquake sequence. The thesis plots this as a social drama and examines the central discourses of the controversy. The focus of the drama is the Anglican neo-Gothic Christ Church Cathedral, which stands in the central square of Christchurch, New Zealand. A series of major earthquakes in 2010/2011 devastated much of the inner city, destroying many heritage-listed buildings. The Cathedral was severely damaged and was declared by Government officials in 2011 to be a dangerous building, which needed to be demolished. The owners are the Church Property Trustees, chaired by Bishop Victoria Matthews, a Canadian appointed in 2008. In March 2012 Matthews announced that the Cathedral, because of safety and economic factors, would be deconstructed. Important artefacts were to be salvaged and a new Cathedral built, incorporating the old and new. This decision provoked a major controversy, led by those who claimed that the building could and should be restored. Discourses of history and heritage, memory, place and identity, ownership, economics and power are all identified, along with the various actors, because of their significance. However, the thesis is primarily concerned with the differing meanings given to the Cathedral. The major argument centres on the symbolic interaction between material objects and human subjects and the various ways these are interpreted. At the end of the research period, December 2015, the Christ Church Cathedral stands as a deteriorating wreck, inhabited by pigeons and rats and shielded by protective, colourfully decorated wooden fences. The decision about its future remains unresolved at the time of writing.

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  • Gaining insights into public transport passenger satisfaction using crowdsourced information

    Douglas-Clifford, Andrew George (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • In situ ground evaluation by deep soil mixing

    Foy, Hamish Michael (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Between 2010 and 2011, Canterbury experienced a series of four large earthquake events with associated aftershocks which caused widespread damage to residential and commercial infrastructure. Fine grained and uncompacted alluvial soils, typical to the Canterbury outwash plains, were exposed to high peak ground acceleration (PGA) during these events. This rapid increase in PGA induced cyclic strain softening and liquefaction in the saturated, near surface alluvial soils. Extensive research into understanding the response of soils in Canterbury to dynamic loading has since occurred. The Earthquake Commission (EQC), the Ministry of Business and Employment (MBIE), and the Christchurch City Council (CCC) have quantified the potential hazards associated with future seismic events. Theses bodies have tested numerous ground improvement design methods, and subsequently are at the forefront of the Canterbury recovery and rebuild process. Deep Soil Mixing (DSM) has been proven as a viable ground improvement foundation method used to enhance in situ soils by increasing stiffness and positively altering in situ soil characteristics. However, current industry practice for confirming the effectiveness of the DSM method involves specific laboratory and absolute soil test methods associated with the mixed column element itself. Currently, the response of the soil around the columns to DSM installation is poorly understood. This research aims to understand and quantify the effects of DSM columns on near surface alluvial soils between the DSM columns though the implementation of standardised empirical soil test methods. These soil strength properties and ground improvement changes have been investigated using shear wave velocity (Vs), soil behaviour and density response methods. The results of the three different empirical tests indicated a consistent improvement within the ground around the DSM columns in sandier soils. By contrast, cohesive silty soils portrayed less of a consistent response to DSM, although still recorded increases. Generally, within the tests completed 50 mm from the column edge, the soil response indicated a deterioration to DSM. This is likely to be a result of the destruction of the soil fabric as the stress and strain of DSM is applied to the un‐mixed in situ soils. The results suggest that during the installation of DSM columns, a positive ground effect occurs in a similar way to other methods of ground improvement. However, further research, including additional testing following this empirical method, laboratory testing and finite 2D and 3D modelling, would be useful to quantify, in detail, how in situ soils respond and how practitioners should consider these test results in their designs. This thesis begins to evaluate how alluvial soils tend to respond to DSM. Conducting more testing on the research site, on other sites in Christchurch, and around the world, would provide a more complete data set to confirm the results of this research and enable further evaluation. Completing this additional research could help geotechnical DSM practitioners to use standardised empirical test methods to measure and confirm ground improvement rather than using existing test methods in future DSM projects. Further, demonstrating the effectiveness of empirical test methods in a DSM context is likely to enable more cost effective and efficient testing of DSM columns in future geotechnical projects.

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  • Women's Voices: Solace and social innovation in the aftermath of the 2010 Christchurch earthquakes

    McManus, R. (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The Canterbury earthquakes and the rebuild are generation-defining events for twenty-first century Aotearoa/ New Zealand. This article uses an actor network approach to explore 32 women’s narratives of being shaken into dangerous disaster situations and reconstituting themselves to cope in socially innovative ways. The women’s stories articulate on-going collective narratives of experiencing disaster and coping with loss in ‘resilient’ ways. In these women’s experiences, coping in disasters is not achieved by talking through the emotional trauma. Instead, coping comes from seeking solace through engagement with one’s own and others’ personal risk and resourcefulness in ways that feed into the emergence of socially innovative voluntary organisations. These stories offer conceptual insight into the multivalent interconnections between resilience and vulnerabilities and the contested nature of post-disaster recovery in Aotearoa/New Zealand. These women gave voice to living through disasters resiliently in ways that forged new networks of support across collective and personal narratives and broader social goals and aspirations for Aotearoa/New Zealand’s future.

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  • Measuring glucose control: can one metric rule them all?

    Chase, J.G.; Shaw, G.M. (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Overseas and New Zealand Trends in Burials and Cremations

    McManus, R. (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Home language maintenance and development among first generation migrant children in an Irish primary school: An investigation of attitudes

    Connaughton-Crean, Lorraine; Pádraig, Ó Duibhir (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This qualitative study was undertaken against the backdrop of rapidly increasing levels of immigration to Ireland and a subsequent growing increase in the percentage of children attending Irish primary schools with a first language other than English or Irish, the two official languages of the country. The research investigates the attitudes of a group of first generation minority language children, of various ethnic backgrounds, to home language maintenance and development as well as their experiences of home language use both in school and in the family home. Data were collected from 17 minority language children, aged between 10 and 13 years and living in Ireland for a period of between three and seven years. Data collection methods included focus group interviews and semi-structured individual interviews, during which participants expressed beliefs, opinions and attitudes surrounding language practices. Interviews conducted with four parents of the child participants provided additional data. In addition, an interview with the teacher of a complementary language school for Polish children highlighted the efforts made by the Polish community; the largest non-Irish group in Ireland, to promote home language maintenance in the family. The data show that while the majority of children and parents display positive attitudes to home language maintenance and development, children face challenges in continuing to develop the literacy skills in the home language. The importance of maintaining and continuing to develop the home language for continued communication with extended family members is clear. The need for familial support in relation to the opportunities children have to engage in home language learning is evident. The perceptions of English as a global language and as a valuable asset were evident among both children and parents. There is no provision made for the formal learning of home languages to children in Ireland, and the only opportunity for children to do so is limited to privately run complementary schools, which are not always accessible to all nationalities. Concerns of children and parents regarding continued development in the home language are voiced, and in most cases, these concerns are borne out of a possible return to their native countries.

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  • Self-propulsion and mixing of microdroplets through surface tension gradient

    Ng, Vi-Vie (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The topic researched for this thesis pertains to the transport and mixing of liquids in the micro-scale. With microfluidic applications in mind, the aim of this research is to further understand and investigate the role of surface tension gradient in the behavior of liquid droplets and slugs. Various platforms that offer differing air-liquid interface exposure, as well as the influence of gravity, have been studied in this research. First, the work pertaining to the uphill climb of a water droplet due to the presence of an adjacent volatile droplet is presented. The experimental results from this novel method of propulsion were confirmed through numerical simulations that accounted for two-phase flows and the transport of diluted species. Second, the mixing of two miscible liquid droplets, of which one is varied by concentration, was investigated. The results provide a clear contrast between the mixing rates resulting from two systems: one with the influence of surface tension gradient, and the other with only molecular diffusion. The numerical simulations carried out confirmed that mixing rate is improved when a surface tension gradient is present. Third, the actuation of droplets in a partially-enclosed setup known as a Hele-Shaw cell was investigated. Sandwiched in between two parallel plates, the actuation of a water droplet was observed upon the introduction of a volatile droplet adjacent to it. The Marangoni and dissipative forces were estimated through both analytical and numerical approaches, where close agreement was found. Lastly, a numerical model was developed to estimate the resistive force for a water slug in a capillary tube. Compared to the first three works investigated, the setup for the capillary tube is different in that it is fully-enclosed. In the numerical approach, the experimental parameters previously published by our group were used and a range of body force values were incorporated to estimate the forces. As a result, numerical results for Marangoni force that agrees well with analytical values were obtained. A second dimensionless model built allowed for the study of mixing time through altering only the Reynolds and Peclet number. The work undertaken for this research has shown the feasibility of liquid self-propulsion in various setups. Additional parametric studies performed serve as a valuable contribution to this thesis. The numerical models built enable the understanding of the effects of parameters that are otherwise difficult to achieve experimentally. The works presented in this thesis, both experimental and numerical, provide insight into droplet actuation or coalescence through surface tension gradient, which could serve as a basis for future work in the similar context.

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