6,439 results for Victoria University of Wellington

  • High-Resolution Water Stable Isotope Ice-Core Record: Roosevelt Island, Antarctica

    Emanuelsson, Daniel (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis presents a water-isotope (δD) record from 1900 to 2009 for the Roosevelt Island Climate Evolution (RICE) ice core, Antarctica. Examination of the RICE isotope record with observation data (using global reanalysis and SST datasets) revealed details of the climate signal that is preserved within the full 763 m isotope record. RICE δD provides a proxy record, which captures the central tropical Pacific ENSO variability, the significant (p < 0.01) central Pacific δD-SST correlation pattern contain the Niño-4 SST region. Central tropical Pacific ENSO variability projects upon the Amundsen Sea region via a Pacific–South American pattern (PSA)-like teleconnection. RICE δD is primarily influenced by Amundsen Sea circulation, which coincides with the leading PSA pattern’s (PSA1) circulation focal point in the Amundsen Sea. Additionally, RICE regional physical setting (sheltered from direct impact from Amundsen Sea cyclones by WA orography) offers a unique setting, where enriched isotopes only are associated with one PSA1 polarity (El Niño, PSA1+, Amundsen Sea anticyclones). In contrast, during La Niña and Amundsen Sea cyclones, δD is depleted. Combined these settings, provides a compelling explanation to why RICE δD preserves PSA1 and ENSO variability. On interannual and seasonal time scales, the RICE δD variability is well-explained by the PSA teleconnections and their interactions over the Pacific sector. The influence from PSA2 on δD is strong during the beginning of the year (December–February, DJF). In contrast, the PSA1 influence is strong during the latter part of the year, peaking in spring (September–November, SON). The isotope record appears to preserve tropical Pacific El Niño-like interdecadal variability, particularly a decadal-signal from the central-Pacific (Niño-4 SST region) and from the Pacific-wide Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO). On decadal-scales RICE δD is modulated by ENSO and Southern Annular Mode (SAM); when the correlation with SAM is active (during IPO+) δD appears to be in a depleted state and when the correlation with SAM breaks down (during IPO−) δD appears to be in a relatively enriched state. A RICE δD SST proxy reconstruction can potentially provide a record longer than the currently available observational datasets, allowing for examination of intrinsic decadal-scale tropical Pacific climate variability and its extratropical impact.

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  • Enabling Wilderness

    McKone, Matt (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Internationally known for its picturesque landscapes, New Zealand encourages both locals and tourists to experience them first hand by walking one of the many tracks around the country, an activity locally known as tramping. The Department of Conservation has identified a small number of these tracks as showcasing particularly picturesque areas; naming them the ‘Great Walks’ of New Zealand. These allow fit individuals to traverse unique landscapes over multiple days, staying over night in rustic huts. The relationship between healthy wellbeing and outdoor experiences is well documented; however, not every fit individual is physically able to experience some of New Zealand’s most significant landscapes due to the difficulty of access. This thesis combines elements of landscape architecture with the existing practises of construction in a conservation area to propose a new ‘Great Walk’ for New Zealand that would allow athletes with a physical impairment to experience New Zealand’s unique landscapes. In doing so, it will provide the opportunity for physically impaired people to continue tramping, or discover a new outdoor activity that not only improves their physical and mental wellbeing; but also allows them to establish personal connections to the land they are from or visiting. Physically pulling/pushing and manoeuvring through ‘backcountry’ landscapes, this research-led-design encourages the physically impaired community to engage with difficult terrains in a multi-sensorial manner.

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  • Expecting the unexpected: Redefining the home to adapt to the lifetime requirements of its occupants

    Groom, Sarah (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    What happens when the home expects the unexpected? Since the beginning of the current housing price rise in 2012, homeownership in New Zealand has become increasingly difficult. The desire to enter the property market has been impeded by the unsuitability of current housing stock that no longer meets the needs of the modern household. While it is widely accepted by economists, yet denied by politicians, New Zealand is amid a housing crisis. The government is addressing the issue by introducing a means to allow housing to be produced more quickly. This new housing is expected to mitigate the issues surrounding a shortage of land and population increase, by developing a large proportion of new developments in the classification of medium density housing. With a shortfall of 10,000 houses per annum, the current situation presents an opportunity to reassess how medium density housing (MDH) is configured in New Zealand. To break the cycle of housing stock rendering itself unsuitable in the future, this thesis aims to investigate how housing could be designed to allow for change over time. All age groups stand to benefit from a home that is carefully planned and considers their lifetime needs. An established design framework enables the prefabricated modular system to adapt, reflecting the lifetime requirements of its occupants. The outcome is an innovative, alternate design solution that considers the wellbeing of occupants through a lifetime design approach, offering adaptability and efficient production through prefabrication. A home that expects the unexpected.

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  • Illustrating Income Mobility: Two New Measures*

    Creedy, John; Gemmell, Norman (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Jenkins and Lambert (1997) demonstrated that a number of measures of poverty could be combined and compared using the "Three Is of Poverty" (TIP) curve; the ‘three Is’ being the incidence, intensity and inequality of poverty. This paper takes the insights from the TIP curve and applies them to income growth based measures of mobility, proposing a "Three Is of Mobility", or TIM, curve. Similar analysis is then applied to re-ranking measures of mobility to yield a re-ranking ratio (RRR) curve. Illustrations are provided using income data from random samples of New Zealand income taxpayers over the period 1998 to 2010. It is argued that both curves represent simple graphical devices that nevertheless conveniently illustrate the "Three Is" properties of income mobility.

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  • Making Connections 3D printing, Libraries and augmenting their reality

    Hughes-Ward, Dylan (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Digital technologies have initiated a global shift in the way we conceive, configure, and exchange information. This shift is occurring on many levels and is impacting the way many organisations operate; including Libraries. “Individuals and organizations now have many sources alternative to those provided by libraries, which would suggest that the role of libraries is shrinking. However, libraries are expanding to include a wider array of services, such as providing digital libraries and support for distance learning” (Borgman, 2003, p. 653). As they continue to re-examining their role, many libraries are currently exploring 3D printing in the form of “makerspaces” in an attempt to engage people in the library environment. Doing this raises the question “But why exactly is it appropriate for a library service to provide 3D printing?” (Rundle, 2013). In response to the question, this thesis explores the role that 3D printing may take in making connections between collections and people in new and interesting ways, beyond the typical application as a “makerspace” (Cavalcanti, 2013). In doing so it acknowledges that 3D printing does not exist in isolation and that its real potential to enhance both content and collections might best be realised in combination with the many other forms of 3D and 4D digital media and systems that are emerging at an exponential rate. This thesis speculates on what that potential may be, through a series of design scenarios that simulate future possibilities of 3D printing and Augmented Reality. The National Library of New Zealand Te Puna Mātauranga o Aotearoa provides the context for this exploration and the opportunity to demonstrate how revisiting their collections with reference to these new technologies can empower its mandate to “collect, connect and co-create knowledge to power New Zealand” (National Library of New Zealand, 2015).

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  • Income Dynamics, Pro-Poor Mobility And Poverty Persistence Curves*

    Creedy, John; Gemmell, Norman (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores poverty income dynamics in the form of income mobility by the poor and poverty persistence, making use of simple diagrams. It seeks to illustrate (a) the extent to which income mobility is pro-poor; and (b) when mobility is associated with persistence below, or movement across, a povery line over a specified time period. While statistical measures can be used to examine detailed characteristics of income dynamics, two simple diagrams are shown to capture the extent of pro-poor mobility and poverty persistence respectively in ways that allow convenient comparisons. These are referred to as a ‘three I’s of mobility’ (or TIM) curve, and a ‘poverty persistence curve’, The curves are illustrated using anonymised Inland Revenue longitudinal individual income data for New Zealand over 2006-10.

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  • A Selected Annotated Bibliography of Books at the New Muslim Project Collection: Providing a Guided Description of Islamic Resources for Information Seekers in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Mahli, Rudy bin (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The New Muslim Project (NMP) office has a considerable collection of printed books about Islam, and the unique feature of the collection is that most the books are in English. These meticulously handpicked books are available to either be taken home permanently (as some titles have multiple copies), or borrowed by those who would like to know about the religion. NMP’s initial plan was to set up a proper online library for the collection. However, due to the scarcity of staff time and volunteers, the collection lacks even a basic catalogue that makes informed access to the books almost impossible. The main objective of this bibliography is not about introducing Islam. Instead, it is about providing people with a relevant summation of selective Islamic books from the NMP collection so they are better informed before choosing a book from NMP collection to read. The bibliography of selected Islamic books from the NMP collection consists of entries arranged in an index card format utilising a modified variety of the Zotero reference report. The primary focus of the bibliography will be the annotations, and subjects that categorise each book. Each book’s annotation will help readers decide whether the book contains the information they seek. Subjects work as a rudimentary method of grouping the bibliography, as well as an elementary approach for readers when deciding on a topic to read. The items are first grouped based on their subject, and then ordered alphabetically based on their title. Lastly, the bibliography also provides a list of subject, tag and author indexes to further facilitate readers’ access to the selected books.

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  • A grounded theory of the architectonics of library spaces

    Esling, Simon John Walter (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Research problem: The library, as an architectural typology, is reportedly under threat. There is no question the library space needs to evolve to remain relevant in the twenty-first century. This project seeks to reveal patterns of library design and architectonic principles that will shape future spaces. In an age of distraction and rapid change it may not be enough to assume the traditional role of the library, as a ‘temple of knowledge’ built for books, to guarantee the future of libraries. This project proposes a philosophical examination of the relevance of library buildings in the twenty-first century. Methodology: The grounded theory methodology employed enables a close reading of the determinants behind library design: how libraries influence architectonics and vice-versa. The term architectonics speaks to both architectural design and the importance of buildings as metaphorical representations of humanist principles. The project applies Emmanuel Kant’s philosophical interpretation of architectonics as a ‘system of knowledge’. The steps to generating grounded theory involves the categorisation of data, writing self-reflective memos, theoretical sampling, comparative analysis and theoretical sensitivity. The project also utilises naturalistic observations of three Auckland Public Libraries: Devonport, Rānui and Waiheke. Findings: Each building typology is important and instructive by mapping and reflecting humanist behaviours and endeavours. As things change over time, small details add up to affect the overarching philosophical understanding of architectonics, in this case ‘the library’. Fortunately, libraries do not have to confront the politicisation of technology directly but can maintain an evolutionary path, as a civic space, by using a new architectonic ‘morality’ that is universally inclusive: sustainability through intelligent design. Implications: Library buildings can reach into the humanist needs of design – the moral, ethical, harmonious, sustainable, communal elements. Becoming a sustainable beacon for communities may be constrained by material resources and budgets and not every library will be able to engage with eco-friendly designs in their entirety. Future studies will need to engage with communities, stakeholders and library users to explore whether a sustainable typology for library buildings is a worthy and achievable objective.

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  • Virtual Fieldtrips and Climate Change Education for Tourism Students

    C, Schott (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    While the pedagogical benefits of fieldtrips have long been recognised our ever increasing understanding of the impacts of flying on climate change is presenting educators with a poignant dilemma; the many benefits long associated with international fieldtrips are at odds with the world community’s needs in limiting/halting climatic change. In response, the paper presents the concept of a VR-based virtual fieldtrip as an innovative and carbon-sensitive type of (educational) travel. The paper not only makes the case for virtual fieldtrips as a meaningful learning tool but also explores both the virtual fieldtrip’s impact on Greenhouse Gas emissions and climate change-related learning. On both accounts the initial findings in this paper are very encouraging. More in-depth research is now required to not only develop a deeper understanding of the full breadth of benefits, but also of the diverse weaknesses presented by virtual fieldtrips and how to negotiate them.

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  • [re]presentation: A critique on architectural representation through the agency of the body and image

    Caballes, Claire (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Architecture is more than just an object, and we are more than just a subject. This commonly perceived relationship between body and architecture is the result of representation. Over time, this model has reduced common understanding of architecture to an image, and we, as eyes which view it. This attitude is more prevalent than ever as our society is dominated by screens exploiting images which we consume at face value. The intention of this is thesis to critique the distanced and sterile relationship between body and image through the affective lens. This thesis approaches research in two ways; ‘research for design’ and ‘research through design’. The former begins by understanding the role of the body and image in affective discourse and examines a few case studies which employ these positions. Juhani Palasmaa argues for the acknowledgement of the body as one which is active, visceral and experiential and as such, architecture must be designed accordingly. The case study on Diller and Scofidio’s ‘projectories’ highlights how the image can offer affective qualities when used correctly. These are key arguments identified in the research for design phase and is referred to a source material throughout the duration of the research. ‘Research through design’ extends these positions towards the body and image through three design tests. Each of these tests increase in scale which is the methodology used throughout this thesis. The increase of each scale poses the need for more architectural complexity. The installation focuses on how a sense of embodiment can be intensified through design while the domestic scale explores how images can be re-appraised to offer an affective charge. In the public scale test, both these ideas are developed through a train station design which offers an experience that engages the body through re-appraised images. This thesis results in a speculative design which offers a relationship between body and image that departs from the static representational model. It aims to “re-present representation”.

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  • Data-Driven Facial Expression Analysis from Live Video

    Tay, Wee Kiat (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Emotion analytics is the study of human behavior by analyzing the responses when humans experience different emotions. In this thesis, we research into emotion analytics solutions using computer vision to detect emotions from facial expressions automatically using live video. Considering anxiety is an emotion that can lead to more serious conditions like anxiety disorders and depression, we propose 2 hypotheses to detect anxiety from facial expressions. One hypothesis is that the complex emotion “anxiety” is a subset of the basic emotion “fear”. The other hypothesis is that anxiety can be distinguished from fear by differences in head and eye motion. We test the first hypothesis by implementing a basic emotions detector based on facial action coding system (FACS) to detect fear from videos of anxious faces. When we discover that this is not as accurate as we would like, an alternative solution based on Gabor filters is implemented. A comparison is done between the solutions and the Gabor-based solution is found to be inferior. The second hypothesis is tested by using scatter graphs and statistical analysis of the head and eye motions of videos for fear and anxiety expressions. It is found that head pitch has significant differences between fear and anxiety. As a conclusion to the thesis, we implement a systems software using the basic emotions detector based on FACS and evaluate the software by comparing commercials using emotions detected from facial expressions of viewers.

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  • Taking the high road: Retrofitting amenity onto urban arterial roads

    Dey, Paul (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Amenity values on urban arterial roads are fraught. This is largely due to the traditional traffic capacity versus amenity trade-off. This trade-off implies that high-capacity roads must be inherently deficient in amenity due to issues of air quality, noise nuisance and the physical barrier of streams of traffic. However, a more nuanced position – and one adopted by this thesis - is that arterial roads can be both busy thoroughfares and active, enjoyable destinations. This design-led research explores retrofitting amenity values onto existing arterial roads, creating new spaces and improving qualities of a system not originally constructed with amenity in mind. Cuba Street in Lower Hutt is a regionally significant connector intended for future densified development. In addition to the current link function, this road needs to become more attractive as a destination and address. Consideration at the urban scale encourages broad, strategic planning to support amenity holistically. This urban planning addresses topics like desirable densification, transit-oriented development, walkable centres and how these affect the arterial road condition. In moving from urban-scaled to architectural design, the detailed implementation of the greater policies is tested. Architecture is engaged to respond to the immediate arterial road conditions with spaces and surfaces, protective buffers and layers. In this way - with architectural refinement and a comprehensive, coherent strategy - traffic capacity and amenity can be brought into balance.

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  • The economics of cryptocurrencies – bitcoin and beyond

    Chiu, Jonathan; Koeppl, Thorsten V (2017)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    How well can a cryptocurrency serve as a means of payment? We study the optimal design of cryptocurrencies and assess quantitatively how well such currencies can support bilateral trade. The challenge for cryptocurrencies is to overcome double-spending by relying on competition to update the blockchain (costly mining) and by delaying settlement. We estimate that the current Bitcoin scheme generates a large welfare loss of 1.4% of consumption. This welfare loss can be lowered substantially to 0.08% by adopting an optimal design that reduces mining and relies exclusively on money growth rather than transaction fees to finance mining rewards. We also point out that cryptocurrencies can potentially challenge retail payment systems provided scaling limitations can be addressed.

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  • "Any evidence" in the Family Court

    Hickman, Caroline (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This dissertation examines the origins and justification for the “any evidence” rule which has been a feature of New Zealand family law for many years. The rule provides judicial discretion to admit evidence in the Family Court which would be otherwise inadmissible. Its ongoing value has never been closely examined, although the rule has frequently been criticised. Selected cases have been examined to determine if reliance on the Evidence Act without the “any evidence” rule would have the deleterious outcomes contemplated. Analysis has shown that the rule has very little use and conversely, that the detriment caused by the rule is greater than the harm it was designed to remedy. Repeal and reform options are considered to better achieve the specific purposes of the various family law statutes as well as improve the integrity of the Family Court process overall.

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  • Verboten Island: Contingent Means Toward Indeterminate Architecture

    O'Connell, Nicholas (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This design research project explores the generative possibilities of composite drawing techniques. By engaging with the act of drawing, through interdisciplinary media, creative morphs and shifts are activated that destabilise otherwise known conditions. This work explores the restraints, transformative embodiment and latent opportunities promoted by designing across different media platforms. The intention is to use drawing as a resource of design uncertainty. As a beginning point, the project looks at Nat Chard and Perry Kulper’s design methods as catalogued in Fathoming the Unfathomable (2014). Their analytical techniques are tested through the author’s own speculative drawings, in a series of explorations into key themes and ideas around perception, politics and bicultural division. Through the use of analogue and hybrid digital technologies, these drawings attempt to parallel their work yet deflect it, as a way to speculate, also in parallel, on this emergent and speculative architectural mode of thinking. This research is through three scales of project: a one to one installation, a small house and a network of public retreat lodges. The projects are designed to lead on from one another and to use various shifts in representation, scale and a progressively complex programme, as productive research vehicles. Uncertainties discovered in the installation - through a mix of agency between intra-related techniques - were extended in the following projects, sited on Nga Mokopuna and Matiu/Somes Islands in Wellington harbour, Te Whanganui-a-Tara, New Zealand. The drawing out of intangible characteristics is meshed with the inevitable authorship of the drawer and the feedback of the drawing medium, be it analogue, digital, or robotic. Through an iterative process of making and drawing, in a range of techniques, indeterminate conditions in a fraught subject are extrapolated. This provides a way of understanding such complexities and allowing them to fuse with the act of drawing, resulting in uniquely charged spatial outcomes.

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  • New Zealand Architects Abroad

    Dudding, Michael (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis is an oral history based investigation of four recently graduated architects (Bill Alington, Maurice Smith, Bill Toomath and Harry Turbott) who individually left New Zealand to pursue postgraduate qualifications at United States universities in the immediate postwar period. Guided interviews were conducted to allow the architects to talk about these experiences within the broader context of their careers. The interviews probed their motivations for travelling and studying in the United States. Where possible archival material was also sought (Fulbright applications, university archives) for comparison with the spoken narratives. Although motivated by the search of modernity and the chance to meet the master architects of the period (Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, and Wright) what all gained was an increase in the confidence of their own abilities as architects (or as a landscape architect in the case of Turbott who switched his focus while in the United States). This increase in confidence partly came from realising that their architectural heroes were ordinary people. Although searching for modernity, their encounters with the canon of architectural history also had a profound effect. This detailed knowledge of what these four subjects felt about architecture, architectural education, and their experiences of studying, working, and touring abroad has helped to shed light on the development of and influences on postwar architecture in New Zealand. The series of oral history interviews that were recorded during this project not only form the basis of the research material for this thesis, but are, in their own right, a significant contribution to the knowledge and understanding of New Zealand’s postwar architectural history.

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  • Printable Prosthetics

    Baynes, Stuart (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The practice of fitting and making prosthetic limbs using current techniques leaves little room for innovative research and design. Though market leaders are consistently producing more advanced components, prosthetic technicians are using traditional techniques to fabricate prosthetic limbs. New material and design technologies could enable progressive solutions to historic barriers such as fabrication time and cost. Increasing the amputee’s accessibility to, and enjoyment of exercise may help to advocate and improve their physical and mental health. Design research was used to develop a functional 3D printed swimming prosthesis for lower limb amputees with the use of 3D scanning, parametric software and Fused Deposition Modelling. Using digital technologies has the potential to provide a platform for cost effective specialty prosthetic limbs, enabling and enriching recreational sport for amputees. Prototypes were developed with a unilateral trans-tibial amputee using an iterative process involving material testing and user testing. These prototypes allowed him to walk independently to the pool and produced positive effects on his swimming, including a recreated anthropometric symmetry. As advances in data collection and additive manufacturing continue to be made we will be able to more closely cater to the individual’s needs whilst challenging the status quo in prosthesis craft.

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  • Classless Object Semantics

    Jones, Timothy (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Objects have been categorised into classes that declare and implement their behaviour ever since the paradigm of object-orientation in programming languages was first conceived. Classes have an integral role in the design and theory of object-oriented languages, and often appear alongside objects as a foundational concept of the paradigm in many theoretical models. A number of object-oriented languages have attempted to remove classes as a core component of the language design and rebuild their functionality purely in terms of objects, to varying success. Much of the formal theory of objects that eschews classes as a fundamental construct has difficulty encoding the variety of behaviours possible in programs from class-based languages. This dissertation investigates the foundational nature of the class in the object-oriented paradigm from the perspective of an ‘objects-first’, classless language. Using the design of theoretical models and practical implementations of these designs as extensions of the Grace programming language, we demonstrate how objects can be used to emulate the functionality of classes, and the necessary trade-offs of this approach. We present Graceless, our theory of objects without classes, and use this language to explore what class functionality is difficult to encode using only objects. We consider the role of classes in the types and static analysis of object-oriented languages, and present both a practical design of brand objects and a corresponding extension of our theory that simulates the discipline of nominal typing. We also modify our theory to investigate the semantics of many different kinds of implementation reuse in the form of inheritance between both objects and classes, and compare the consequences of these different approaches.

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  • A permanent tent: A retrospective and reconsideration of the A-Frame Chalet in New Zealand

    Svendsen, Callan (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    The mid twentieth century A-Frame chalet holds a special place in the memories of generations of New Zealanders. Reminiscent of summer and winter getaways, it is perhaps the most poignant architectural representation of leisure and relaxation. The novelty of unconventional sleeping arrangements, intimate spatial dynamics and the somewhat ephemeral nature of the typology combined to imbue the A-Frame with a strong emotional association. This research intends to harness the nostalgic connotations and use this, along with contemporary interior architectural theory, to reinterpret the A-Frame as a relevant form of accommodation suitable for twenty-first century vacationers and permanent inhabitants alike. Early New Zealand A-Frames were supplied as kit sets to be erected by owners with rudimentary knowledge of construction techniques. This ‘low-end’ means of arrival, understandable given the purpose of the dwelling, resulted in a typology that was regarded as a lesser relative to the primary (and more conventional) home. Awkward interior spaces were regarded as novel and tolerable for the duration of the vacation. There is limited academic publication on the A-Frame Chalet and its place in New Zealand architectural history. The aim of this research is to identify the key proponents of the style and use this as a base for a modern reinterpretation encompassing spatial and material issues. The modern tendency toward compact housing and preservation of architecturally distinctive buildings favours a new appreciation of the A-Frame. A reevaluation will address limitations of the original and re-interpret the A-Frame from nostalgic novelty to spatially responsive contemporary architecture.

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  • Concrete Island: Lost Sites and Hidden Heritage

    Johnson, Zackary (2017)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    In cities like Auckland, suburban sprawl has led to the introduction of extensive elevated motorways that create barriers and cuts across the ordering elements of the city. Urban planner Roger Trancik refers to the areas beneath and adjacent to these urban motorways as “lost sites”, considered ‘unbuildable’ even though they occur within the central business district. This research investigation looks at how architecture can help return a sense of place identity and cultural significance to otherwise placeless zones defined by elevated urban motorways. The central Auckland site for this design-led research is the Central Motorway Junction (CMJ), commonly referred to as ‘spaghetti junction’ — a site physically and environmentally inappropriate for housing development, but large and high profile enough to contribute significantly to Auckland’s ‘cultural hub’. The proposed programme for this investigation is a new facility to house Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa’s stored collections. Arguably New Zealand’s most valuable cultural holdings, only 3% of Te Papa Tongarewa’s collections are on display at any time. The rest of the museum’s stored collections are completely hidden from public view within its back of house facilities and warehouse structures in Wellington. Due to Wellington’s location on major fault lines, studies are underway to permanently move the stored collections to Auckland, where they will remain removed from the public eye. This design-led research investigation proposes that once these collections are relocated to Auckland, if they are made visually accessible to the public, they could provide a vital extension of the cultural hub for the city centre. The investigation proposes to architecturally inhabit one of Auckland’s most prominent lost sites, the Central Motorway Junction, in a way that celebrates its iconic elevated motorway as a viable urban context capable of actively contributing to urban re-vitalisation and cultural consolidation. The thesis investigation examines the city’s motorway infrastructure as a framework for a new typology for architecture that actively uses the ‘motorway typology’ to establish architectural and place identity. Simultaneously the investigation explores how expansive elevated motorway sites can provide significant footprints for new public buildings to enhance the cultural identity of the urban centre.

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