1,304 results for 1980

  • 'Ageism' in personnel selection.

    Sewell, Christine A. (1988)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The present research involved two independent studies. The first study looked at "ageism" or age discrimination in selection interviews. The effects of applicant age, information exposure and job status were examined in the interview. The specific research question addressed was whether exposure to information about successful older workers would reduce discrimination against older employees in interview settings. This study was carried out with a sample of 61 managers. Prior to !Ylaking selection decisions about a young applicant (25 years old) or an older applicant (48 years old), subjects read an article which contained either age-related information or neutral information. The age-related information was designed to mitigate against age bias. Videotaped job interviews were then viewed by the subjects who were required to make job performance evaluations and hire decisions about the applicant. Evidence of ageism against the old applicant was found. However as predicted, managers exposed to the age-related information gave significantly more favourable evaluations to the old applicant and were more willing to hire him than the young applicant. The second study addressed a very current research concern - the generalisability of findings in selection research using student samples to managerial samples. The same methodology was repeated with a sample of 119 undergraduate students. The results showed significant differences in students' selection decisions. The students exposed to age-related information gave more favourable ratings to the young applicant, and were not willing to hire the old applicant. The implications of these results are discussed.

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  • The Taxation of Compensation Payments for Personal Injury – Are the Complexities All Getting a Bit Much?

    Cassidy, Julie (1988)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Kinetics of Pharmacologic Response

    Holford, Nicholas; SHEINER, LB (1982)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Understanding the Dose-Effect Relationship. Clinical-Application of Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Models

    Holford, Nicholas; Sheiner, LB (1981-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Alienation of the Right to Rental Income: Booth v FCT

    Cassidy, Julie (1987)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Antigone and Orestes in the works of Athol Fugard

    Mackay, Elizabeth (1989-10)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The Significance of the Classification of a Colonial Acquisition: The Conquered/Settled Distinction

    Cassidy, Julie (1988)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In the last two years or so there has been a renewed interest in whether the Australian Continent should be characterized as having been conquered or settled and the significance of the distinction to the rights of the Aboriginal people. Many of the articles which have emerged simply repeat established principles of law and traditional arguments. Further, many fail to consider in any detail the relevance of the distinction or incorrectly describe its consequences. Even the advocates of the first characterization have been to some extent mistaken, believing the Crown prerogative to be limited in Colonies so acquired, when in fact the indigenous people could be in a worse position in conquered colonies. However, the distinction is nevertheless relevant and beneficial to the claims of the Aboriginal people. It is time that the myth of peaceful In the last two years or so there has been a renewed interest in whether the Australian Continent should be characterized as having been conquered or settled1 and the significance of the distinction to the rights of the Aboriginal people. Many of the articles which have emerged simply repeat established principles of law and traditional arguments. Further, many fail to consider in any detail the relevance of the distinction or incorrectly describe its consequences. Even the advocates of the first characterization have been to some extent mistaken, believing the Crown prerogative to be limited in Colonies so acquired, when in fact the indigenous people could be in a worse position in conquered colonies. However, the distinction is nevertheless relevant and beneficial to the claims of the Aboriginal people. It is time that the myth of peaceful settlement was recognised and to acknowledge as a matter of historical fact that Australia was conquered. settlement was recognised and to acknowledge as a matter of historical fact that Australia was conquered.

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  • A reappraisal of aboriginal policy in colonial Australia: Imperial and colonial instruments and legislation recognising the special rights and status of the Australian aboriginals

    Cassidy, Julie (1989)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Pt IIIA: The Embodiment of Confusion

    Cassidy, Julie (1987-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • A Note on Feagin on Interpreting Art Intentionalistically

    Davies, Stephen (1987)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Common Law, Statute and Equity

    Cassidy, Julie; Kelly, P (1988)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Common Law, Statute and Equity

    Cassidy, Julie; Kelly, P (1989)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Hari Hari : a study of land use and a community

    Maturin, Susan E. (1981)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    A multi-disciplinary approach was used to study land use, and the associated community of Hari Hari. Land use decisions concerning forestry and agriculture, were placed in the context of social and economic needs of the human system and ecological requirements of the natural system. Data was collected from interviews with 17% of the Hari Hari community. The needs of the community were identified, from a detailed study of the Hari Hari people. Past and present land uses were studied in detail to determine the suitability of each land use, and its ability to work within the constraints imposed by the natural system. Future land use options and their social, economic and ecological implications were outlined. The most appropriate options were selected, according to their ability to satisfy the needs of the community, and ecological requirements of the natural systems. Appropriate options for agriculture included the following: a. continuing as at present; and, b. increasing farm management efficiency; and, c. diversification into opossum and deer farming. These options met ecological requirements and would contribute to community needs. The most appropriate option for forestry was found to be; immediate cessation of production logging until the natural constraints are identified and a logging system which works within these constraints is identified. This option conflicts with the social need to maintain employment. However the study found that closure of the sawmill would have little impact upon the Hari Hari community, other than a reduction in employment. Possible options for establishing alternative employment activities were suggested. These included a fur industry, an out-door pursuits centre, cottage industries, and ventures which would promote community self-sufficiency. As a whole, this study emphasised the value of a multi-disciplinary approach to land use planning.

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  • The inter-country diffusion of pharmaceutical products

    Cullen, Ross (1981)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    A major debate has raged over the existence and causes of a phenomenon known as "drug lag". Protagonists in the debate have argued that the U.S.A. is typically late to receive new pharmaceutical products because of the very lengthy delays imposed by F.D.A. regulations before new products can be launched on the U.S. market. Supporters of the. F.D.A. have denied the U.S.A. suffers from a drug lag while proposing alternative explanations for its existence. In this thesis attempt is made to resolve the debate by investigating the pattern of inter-country diffusion of pharmaceutical products. Hypotheses are postulated and tested in an attempt to provide answers to four fundamental questions posed about inter-country diffusion. These questions are: 1. What factors determine the speed of diffusion of pharmaceutical products? 2. What factors determine the extent of diffusion of pharmaceutical products? 3. What factors determine when pharmaceutical products are launched in each country? 4. What factors determine how many pharmaceutical products are launched in each country? A survey of the relevant literature on diffusion of innovations reveals that profit-related variables are consistently useful explanators of diffusion patterns. The tenor of the hypotheses postulated for testing in this thesis is that firms in this industry strive to launch products in a manner designed to maximize their contributions to profits. The diffusion patterns between 18 countries, of 190 products first launched on to the world's markets between 1956 and 1976 are examined to test the hypotheses and thus provide answers to the four questions listed above. Statistical analysis is undertaken to test the hypotheses. There appears to be relatively little evidence to support many of the hypotheses tested about speed and extent of diffusion. However there is considerable evidence that the speed of diffusion of products, after their first launch, has increased steadily throughout the period studied. Deeper investigation suggests the typical time between discovery of products useful properties, and their typical times of availability on the worlds markets may have remained almost constant throughout the twenty one year period studied. Pharmaceutical companies may have acted to compensate for increasingly lengthy delays before products are first launched, by more rapid subsequent launch of products. The number of products which are launched in a country and the magnitude of the delay before they are launched in each country appear to be relatively predictable. Both of these parameters appear to be strongly influenced by countries levels of development. Countries with high health expenditures per capita, appear to receive more produces, more rapidly, than do lower expenditure countries. Interest ultimately focuses on the question of drug lags and the affects of regulations. Drug lags are shown to exist for the U.S.A., Japan and some other countries. When the period studied is divided into two sub-periods relatively strong correlations are shown to exist between ratings of regulatory tightness in markets; and changes in the numbers of products diffusing to markets and changes in mean times before products are launched in markets. Regulations do appear to exert considerable influence on the patterns of inter-country diffusion of pharmaceuticals in the latter part of the period studied.

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  • 'Black Diamond City' a history of Kaitangata mines, miners and community 1860-1913

    Bamford, Tony (1982)

    Honours Dissertation thesis
    University of Otago

    Coal mining is an industry about which people have held and still hold a number of misconceptions. Much of this fact lies purely in lack of understanding for it seems coal mines have always been shunned by the wider community. Isolation however is perhaps an aid to historical analysis for curiosity often prompted investigation even if many of the views expressed were still prejudiced. Similarly, miners, as a group, tended to operate outside the normal social realms of neighbouring societies. But although similarities existed between coal mining communities in a number of areas such as occupational patterns and basic institutions associated with the industry, these settlements cannot be lumped into one basket. Coal mining towns were as different from one another as any non-mining settlements were different from others. This thesis is concerned with such differences. It is concerned also with the pattern of development of such a town. The community, industry and group of people under observation is that of a small town of Kaitangata.[…] Kaitangata was one of the earliest mining settlements in New Zealand, and developed into Otago and Southlands largest coal mine. It had become firmly established by 1880 as a major industry, so that by the turn of the century Kaitangata had become a very permanent settlement, exhibiting quite ‘normal’ demographic characteristics.[…] [Extract from Introduction]

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  • The mineralogy, geochemistry and origin of Lower Tertiary smectite-mudstones, East Coast deformed belt, New Zealand.

    Fergusson, Linda Jan (1985)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Marine smectite-mudstones of Lower Tertiary age (Teurian to Runangan) occur throughout the East Coast Deformed Belt of New Zealand. In Marlborough, Marl lithofacies of the Amuri Limestone comprise calcareous, siliceous smectite-mudstone alternating with biomicrite. In Wairarapa, the Kandahar Formation consists of calcareous smectite-mudstone, micritic limestone beds and mass-flow greensand beds. Calcareous smectite-mudstone is also a minor interbedded lithology in the Mungaroa Limestone of Wairarapa. The Wanstead Formation in Hawkes Bay comprises uncemented smectite-mudstone with interbedded mass-flow greensands. Lower Tertiary sequences throughout the East Coast Deformed Belt are typically disrupted by thrust faults and associated shear/mélange zones which have developed in the weak smectite-mudstone lithology. Insoluble clay fractions of the smectite-mudstones are composed of well crystallised smectite + illite ± quartz (chert). Both the smectite and illite clays are discrete phases with no interstratification suggestive of post-sedimentary transformation of smectite to illite. From detailed phase analysis, the smectite clay overall is a montmorillonitic species, but with varying interstratification of other dioctahedral smectite species and varying layer charge. No distinct stratigraphic trends in clay fraction mineralogy or smectite mineralogy are apparent. Sand fractions of the mudstones are dominated by authigenic or non-volcanic detrital minerals. Average smectite + illite structural formulas calculated from chemical analyses are commonly non-ideal, with deficiencies in aluminium particularly apparent. The dominant exchangeable cations are calcium in Marlborough mudstones and sodium in Hawkes Bay mudstones. Trace element geochemistry of the smectite-mudstones is similar to that of typical shale and carbonate rocks. Variations in trace element abundances·reflect the lithological character of the mudstones and do not appear to be a useful tool for regional stratigraphic correlation. Combined sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical features of the smectite-mudstones indicate a non-volcanic origin. They did not form by in-situ alteration of ash-falls and are unlikely to have formed from transported/reworked ash. Previous use of the term 'bentonite' for the smectite-mudstones implies such a mode of genesis and should be discontinued. Hemipelagic sedimentation and/or mass-flow redeposition of detrital or neoformed clay in an open oceanic, relatively deep water environment is proposed as the origin of the smectite-mudstones.

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  • A comparison of worst case performance of priority queues used in Dijkstra's shortest path algorithm

    Vickers, Alex (1986)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    This report presents results of experiments comparing the worst case performance of Dijkstra's Single Source Shortest Path algorithm using different priority queues. A description and worst case analysis are given of the five priority queues which were considered.These were an array of keys, array of pointers, binary heap, alpha heap and Fibonacci heap. To produce worst case performance of Dijkstra's algorithm it was necessary for the author to design a method for generating graphs which would induce this behaviour. A family of graphs with this property was discovered and their description is given within. Results of applying Dijkstra's algorithm to graphs of this type, using each of the priority queues are listed in the appendix while the more interesting outcomes are graphed and analysed in the main body of the report.

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  • From subject to device, history as myth in action : the evolution of event from mythic processes as revealed in Waterfront Dispute fiction

    Matthewson, Claire C. (1986)

    Post-doctoral thesis
    University of Otago

    This analysis of selected New Zealand works defends the evolving function of history as fiction-material. It is intended to establish that purpose and treatment alter, as time further separates the writing and the event. The general change is one of development from subject to device properties. In tracing history's evolving role and treatment in fiction, analysis identifies history's eventual source - shown, in fiction, to be mythic and subjectively conceptual.

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  • Stratigraphy, structure and geological history of mid-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks across the Torlesse-like/non Torlesse boundary in the Sawtooth Range-Coverham area, Marlborough.

    Ritchie, D. D. (1986)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This thesis describes the geology of an approximately 100km2 area lying between the Clarence River and Kekerengu. The objectives were to determine the relationship of the "Torlesse-like" sawtooth Group to the late Early Cretaceous Coverham Group; to determine the relationship between the coeval Split Rock and Burnt Creek Formations within the Coverham Group; and to investigate the nature of Cretaceous events which led to the traditional differentiation into older Torlesse type "basement" and younger Cretaceous "cover". Geological mapping indicates the presence of three packets (Glencoe, Pikes and Coverham Blocks) of sedimentary rocks separated by the major Ouse and Pikes Faults. These packets comprise probable submarine fan flysch, massivE? sandstone, massive siltstone, acid tuffs and conglomerate of Sawtooth Group (Torlesse-like Urutawan - Motuan) unconformably overlain by probable slope basin flysch, massive siltstone, Inoceramus shellbed, and conglomerate of Coverham Group (non-Torlesse). The unconformity is most commonly angular but in a few places is a more subtle paraconformity. A further minor unconformity occurs at the base of the Ouse Member within the Split Rock Formation of the Coverham Group and is thought to reflect the presence of the growing Ouse Anticline. The Coverham Group rocks have similar Motuan - Teratan ages on each side of the Ouse Fault. The Split Rock Formation, previously used only for rocks in the middle Clarence Valley, has been extended to the Coverham area and used for rocks west of the Ouse Fault. The partly coeval Burnt Creek Formation east of the Ouse Fault was probably deposited some distance from the Split Rock Formation in a different basin separated by a structural high. They were juxtaposed by low angle reverse movement on the Fault in the Late Cretaceous. structural/deformation characteristics cannot be used as criteria for separating the Torlesse-like rocks from non-Torlesse rocks in the study area. It is dangerous to assume that 'Torlesseness' is a certain and particular state of deformation. Both the Torlesse (Sawtooth) and Coverham Group rocks exhibit a whole spectrum of deformation from 'broken formation' to more or less undisturbed beds. The pattern of deposition and deformation suggests an accretionary prism setting for these rocks. Sawtooth Group rocks are likely to represent 'younger' Pahau Terrane rocks which were deformed by a single intra-Motuan event either tectonic or perhaps a huge submarine slide, creating widespread unconformity between them and the Coverham Group slope deposits. Continuing instability is likely to have led to growing folds and further minor unconformities. The termination of the Rangitata Orogeny occurred in a progressive and evolutionary way representing a mid-Late Cretaceous change from a compressional subduction regime to a tensional rifting regime. Andesitic-rhyolitic volcanism was common in the late Early Cretaceous.

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  • Phase manipulation of speech using FIR digital filters

    Stephen, R. D. C. (1987)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Three related investigations involving the fields of FIR digital filters, phase manipulation of speech, and speech coding via bandwidth compression are reported. The first investigation is aimed at providing a means of generating the impulse response coefficients of a non-linear phase FIR digital filter. Existing methods of designing linear-phase filters are discussed and compared from a defined common comparison base. The methods available for designing non-linear phase filters are examined. An existing linear phase design method is extended to the non-linear phase case and shown to be useful. The required impulse response length in the presence of non-linear phase is studied. Particular emphasis is placed on "random phase" filters and their generation because they are required by the second investigation. The second investigation examines in detail the ramifications of phase randomising a speech signal. The analytic zero representation of speech which forms the underlying base on which the discussion, and answers, are based is elucidated. The technique of using a non-linear phase FIR filter is shown to be feasible and as a minimum, offers at least the same level of performance as a very early reported technique. Significant differences in the behaviour of male and female speech is demonstrated. The third and final investigation reports some early and incomplete experiments on a radically different approach to achieving band width compression and expansion of a signal. The technique is referred to as "phase unwrapping". It is based on the application of a linear phase FIR digital filter in an adaptation of the traditional convolution relation. The motivation and validity of the basic idea is outlined and justified via application of the procedure to simple sinusoids and one experiment using real speech. The fundamental problem to be overcome is identified and the basis of a possible means of solution indicated.

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