16,156 results for 2010, ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Functional analysis of candidate flowering time genes from the model legume Medicago truncatula

    Che, Chong (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Flowering at optimal times promotes the success of plant sexual reproduction and agronomic productivity and yield. Legumes are the second most important group of crop plants, but their flowering gene networks are less well understood than in the Brassicaceae and Poaceae. Medicago truncatula (Medicago) is a legume model plant with powerful genetic resources and which flowers in response to long day length and vernalisation (winter cold) conditions. A putative Medicago Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) subunit VERNALISATION2 (MtVRN2) was characterised previously in the Putterill laboratory, whose mutation led to early flowering. This indicated that MtVRN2 represses the transition to flowering in Medicago, opposite to VRN2 function in Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis). In addition, candidate floral integrator and homeotic genes had elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant. An attempt was made to further characterise MtVRN2 function by analysing a candidate protein interactor CURLY LEAF (CLF, a candidate PRC2 member) using yeast two hybrid and pull down assays and selected candidate target genes (FLOWERING LOCUS Ta1, APETALA1, AGAMOUS-LIKE11 and SEPALLATA3b) using Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-PCR. In addition, a second candidate PRC2 member Medicago EMBRYONIC FLOWER2 (EMF2) was aimed to be functionally characterised. Third, the function of six candidate flowering genes related to SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS1 (SOC1) and FRUITFULL (FUL), some with elevated expression in the Mtvrn2 mutant, was examined by ectopic expression in Arabidopsis. The results of ChIP-PCR using transgenic Medicago plants overexpressing epitope HA-tagged MtVRN2 showed that MtVRN2 did not appear to bind directly to the selected candidate target genes. The protein interaction studies suggested that MtVRN2 might not physically interact with MtCLF via their VEFS and C5 domains respectively. The investigation of the cDNA clones of three MtEMF2-like genes revealed several different potential coding sequences from the annotated genomic sequence. Functional analysis revealed that MtEMF2 did not appear to play the same role as AtEMF2 in flowering time control. Three MtFUL genes and three MtSOC1 genes were identified in Medicago, as opposed to one of each in Arabidopsis. The overexpression of these six genes in Arabidopsis indicated the potential role of three of them, MtFULa, MtFULb and MtSOC1a in flowering time control because they accelerated Arabidopsis flowering.

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  • Investigating the Climatic and Oceanographic Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variation in Coastal Turbidity and Sedimentation

    Seers, Blake (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Turbidity and sediment input in the coastal environment are greatly affected by human activities on land. Understanding the climatic, oceanographic and environmental drivers of temporal and spatial variability in coastal turbidity and sediment ux is key to understanding these processes and predicting how they may be affected by climate change. This thesis analysed monitoring data on coastal turbidity and sediment trap rates in the Hauraki Gulf to investigate how these spatio-temporal patterns relate to meteorological and oceanographic variables along an estuarine to open-coast gradient. These relationships were initially explored using a multivariate approach, and then quanti ed using a bayesian hierarchical framework with spline components. This model was developed along with two software packages to provide a predictive framework for analysing environmental monitoring data, with an emphasis on reproducibility and transparency. Turbidity declined along the estuarine to open-coast gradient. The primary driver of turbidity at the exposed open-coast regions was recent wave conditions that resuspend sediment, whereas tidal currents and daily rainfall are the primary drivers of turbidity at the harbour and estuarine sites respectively. The rate of fine sediment (< 63??) accumulation in traps was largely governed by processes that resuspend bottom sediments, primarily wind-generated waves and tides within harbour regions, and ocean swells on the open coast. Surprisingly, there was little to no relationship with rainfall suggesting that sediment traps should not be used to document terrestrial sediment introduction on subtidal reefs. The strong coupling found between meteorological and oceanographic factors, and coastal turbidity and sediment ux highlight a number of mechanisms whereby coastal turbidity will likely change as a result of climate change. Overall, turbidity is likely to decrease based on predictions of increased offshore winds and drier conditions throughout this region. However, more frequent and intense extreme weather events will likely result in unprecedented, transient increases in turbidity, creating a highly variable coastal turbidity environment. These effects on turbidity will likely be exacerbated by sea level rise and increasing coastal erosion, therefore improvements in land management practices and coastal protection are essential to offset the likely impacts of climate change on coastal turbidity.

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  • A Multi-scale Investigation of the Joint Tissue Response to Impact Induced Injury

    Workman, Joshua (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    A bovine patellae model of early osteoarthritis was used to investigate the multiscale response of articular cartilage to impact induced injury, and how this response differed in tissue showing early signs of degeneration. An impact testing rig was designed, constructed and validated. Following this, the mechanical response of articular cartilage with increasing levels of degeneration was investigated. The resultant reaction force from the cartilage decreased as the amount of degeneration present increased. The elasticity of the collision also decreased with level of degeneration, indicating that collisions with more degenerate cartilage lose more energy. It was determined that articular cartilage with only mild degeneration was more vulnerable to high levels of macro-scale damage than healthy tissue. There were no significant changes in mechanical properties during earlystage degeneration, but there are subtle structural changes such a decreased brillar interconnectivity which lead to a large increase in tissue vulnerability. In healthy articular cartilage, the matrix contains a highly interconnected network of collagen brils which are effective in halting the progression of fissures. In mild degeneration, there is a loss of transverse connectivity between brils, leading to a reduced crack arresting ability. These nano-level structural changes have a large influence on the propagation of fissures through the matrix, allowing them to travel through to the sub-chondral bone. In mildly degenerate articular cartilage the peri-cellular matrix is disrupted, reducing its ability to provide a mechanical transition between chondrocyte and surrounding matrix. This lead to ~260% more dead cells in mildly degenerate G1 cartilage after impact injury compared to healthy G0. In a linear regression model, the coeffcient of restitution, percent cell death and macroscopic Outerbridge level of degeneration were able to account for 94.5% of the variation in cartilage tissue vulnerability to impact damage. This research has contributed to a deeper understanding of the link between biologically mediated micro-anatomical and physiological changes, vulnerability to injury and potential initiation of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. The earliest stages of disease initiation cause the tissue to have a sharp increase in vulnerability to severe damage with a high possibility to hasten development of full depth osteoarthritis.

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  • Autonomic reflex control of dominant pacemaker location and impulse propagation in the right atrium

    Ashton, Jesse (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Reflex vagal control is a fundamental component of the autonomic regulation of heart rate, and loss of function in the vagal reflex arc is a negative prognostic indicator of cardiovascular health. Vagal activation can cause rapid and profound heart rate slowing and a concomitant caudal shift of the impulse origin within the sino-atrial node (SAN). The research presented in this thesis furthers our understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to pacemaker shift in the SAN. This advance has been accomplished through mapping impulse propagation in the right atrium (RA) during reflex activation with higher precision than previously achieved. For the first time, high-resolution extracellular and optical mapping techniques have been employed in a rat arterially perfused working heart-brainstem preparation (WHBP). Autonomic reflex pathways in the WHBP were kept intact, which enabled stimulation of the baroreceptor reflex under tightly controlled conditions, free of the confounding effects of anaesthetic agents on neural function. TheWHBP spontaneously produced eupneiclike phrenic nerve activity, characteristic of adequate oxygenation of the brainstem, and central cardiorespiratory coupling was preserved. The baroreflex was activated systematically by applying pressure challenges of increasing magnitude. Distinct dominant pacemaker (DP) regions with preferential conduction pathways were identified and related to the underlying distribution of cholinergic nerves fluorescently labelled using antibodies. There is a wide-spread notion that the DP is the SAN region with the highest intrinsic rate, and that ACh-induced pacemaker shift occurs when cells in the central node slow, allowing caudal pacemaker cells less sensitive to ACh to assume control at a higher rate. Our findings for the baroreflex onset are not consistent with this view. Baroreflex induced caudal DP shifts were synchronous with substantial increases in cycle length (CL). On the other hand, rostral pacemaker shifts during baroreflex recovery were coincident with small decreases in CL. We also observed competitive pacemaker activity between rostral and caudal regions immediately before DP shifts in recovery, but during onset only subthreshold depolarisation was detected in the rostral pacemaker region. Activation spread from caudal pacemaker sites through distinct conduction pathways to the crista terminalis (CT), but propagation toward the rostral SAN was slow. Taken together, these results are consistent with low safety factor for electrical propagation in the rostral SAN during baroreflex and suggest caudal DP shift occurs as a result of failure of central pacemaker cells to drive activation in surrounding myocardium. To probe this mechanism further, we compared baroreflex results to responses recorded during stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors with arterial injection of KCN and homogeneous stimulation of muscarinic (M2) receptors with an arterial bolus of carbachol (CCh). The dynamics of DP shift during onset and recovery of chemoreflex activation were comparable to that recorded during baroreflex responses, but larger fluctuations in CL and DP shifts were seen in synchrony with inspiratory motor drive, consistent with enhanced respiratory coupling as a result of the hypoxic stimulus. Compared to baroreflex and chemoreflex responses, CCh induced more gradual changes in CL, and DP shifts during onset and recovery occurred with small changes in CL that were not significantly different. This result led us to hypothesise that the speed of onset of cholinergic stimulation is an important factor in determining whether DP shift occurs due to failure of impulse propagation from the central SAN. To test this hypothesis, we explored changes in the dynamics of DP shift following inhibition of If with the HCN-channel specific blocker ivabradine (IVB). Post-IVB, baseline CL increased on average by ???19%, indicating effective If inhibition in the SAN. The onset of CL responses to reflex and CCh stimulation was faster post-IVB, with a shorter time to maximum CL. There was a trend toward larger increases in CL with DP shifts during onset and recovery but this was not significant over all stimulation methods. The trend was most evident for CCh responses, where the range of CL increases with DP shift was augmented. In some reflex responses, the increase in CL was attenuated post-IVB and caudal DP shifts did not occur or occurred with small changes in CL later in the response, suggesting IVB could have altered reflex function. Here, our findings show If acts to buffer the rate slowing effects of cholinergic stimulation and thereby modulates the timing of DP shift during periods of increasing CL. Lastly, we attempted to develop a toxic cardiomyopathy model of atrial structural remodelling in order to assess the effects of SAN fibrosis on reflex control of pacemaker function in the WHBP. We delivered single isoprenaline injections on two consecutive days across a dosage range from 150 to 340 mg kg???1. In vivo cardiac cine-MRI demonstrated a slightly lower left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction at 340 mg kg???1 compared to control (66% vs. 71%), and less contraction of the LV lumen at end systole. Measurements of LV pressure at this dose showed an elevation of mean change in diastolic pressure compared to control (9.58 vs. 3.54 mmHg). Picrosirius red staining of collagen in LV tissue sections showed patchy interstitial fibrosis which was not present on sections from control samples. Our results are consistent with the development of ventricular dysfunction and structural remodelling after isoprenaline injection, but the very low mortality rate observed (5%) suggests the effects of isoprenaline in the juvenile rats used here are more moderate than those reported for adult rats. In conclusion, we have completed the first high-resolution analysis of SAN function during vagal reflex activity in a strictly controlled preparation with intact autonomic reflex pathways. Our most novel finding is that reflex-induced caudal DP shift is not driven by rate entrainment alone and appears instead to be the result of failure of impulse propagation from the central SAN. We hypothesise that the DP is therefore the region with the highest intrinsic rate in the SAN that has the capacity to drive electrical activity in the surrounding atrial myocardium.

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  • Roadmaps for Upgrading Unupgradable Legacy Processes in Inter-Organisational Middleware Systems: Concepts, Framework, Architecture, and Implementations

    Jrad, Radhouane (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Information Systems (IS) have long become leading enablers of organisational transformation and operational improvements, extensively helping in managing and improving end-to-end business processes through use of advanced and evolving technologies. As organisations relentlessly moved towards Business-to-Business (B2B), integrating processes both internally and with partners became a heavily researched subject. One notable B2B solution is the Inter- Organisational Information System (IOIS). IOIS is a logical IS, shared amongst business partners, whereby their exchange of information and the trust it requires, are rationalised in order to allow business processes to flow as if they were within the same organisation. IOIS has been widely endorsed by businesses due to its efficiency and reliance mostly on existing infrastructure. As B2B relationships grew in size and complexity, and as the market shifted from static partnerships to dynamic relationships where associations are no longer permanent, IOIS also grew in complexity. Besides the need for agility, the increase in efficiency and security requirements engendered the proposition of Inter-Organisational Middleware System (IOMS) as a specific integration component inside IOIS. IOMS is responsible for the technical bridging between various heterogeneous systems, effectively allowing information to cross organisational frontiers. Beyond its technical contribution, IOMS has remarkably grown into proactively managing parts of business processes that flow through it, adding more efficiency through tasks like data validation, information management, and reporting. While the technical aspects of IOMS are well accepted, organisations still tend to lack acknowledgement of its importance as a core business system. This has led to failure to allocate proper resources and strategies for the management of IOMS processes, culminating in the generation of the problem of legacy processes for a relatively new concept. When these legacy processes can no longer be managed and updated using standard or vendor tools and methods, they become effectively Unupgradable. An Unupgradable Legacy Process (ULP) in IOMS is notoriously difficult to manage or reengineer, and it requires extensive and costly resources just to remain functional. The situation becomes more exasperating when multiple ULPs are entwined. The topic of ULPs in IOMS is increasingly identifiable in practice, and has been witnessed by the researcher throughout the fourteen years of involvement in over eight hundred IOIS and IOMS implementation projects. Through the numerous roles held in these projects, diverse lenses were developed to observe different facets of the ULP problem, which culminated in the realisation that the problem needs to be investigated in a structured, rigorous, academic way. However, the subject is yet to attract significant research interest, and this can be attributed not only to the recency of the IOMS domain, but also to the combined technical, practical, and business process knowledge required from the researcher. This is a classic problem of interest divergence between academics and professionals, and while bridging such a gap is a well-documented challenge, methodologies like Action Research (AR) and Design Science Research (DSR) have long been hailed as fitting for addressing such issues. Borrowing from the two approaches, the research proposes the Insider Action Design Research (IADR) methodology as an approach for practitioners to conduct research in a manner pertinent to their practical organisational problems. IADR is multi-methodological by design, and enables the creation and evaluation of relevant artefacts through actionning multiple feedback-based cycles of observation, theory building, experimentation, system design, and implementation. Using IADR to guide its course, the research aims to answer the question of how organisations can approach upgrading ULPs in their IOMS in a standardised way. The research has three overarching goals: (1) assimilate existing knowledge and address the gaps; (2) propose solutions to contain the creation of ULPs in IOMS; and (3) put forward mechanisms to address existing ULPs in IOMS. Apart from the proposition of IADR, the aim of the research is to (1) investigate and comprehend concepts around business integration and how to enable it, (2) understand, define, and delimit the domain of IOMS and its ULPs, (3) evaluate the impact of existing project management methods on process change in IOMS, (4) study what constitutes a successful change in organisational context, (5) propose an IOMS-specific framework for governing process change in IOMS, (6) design IOMS-tailored architectural pattern and architecture for managing processes and technologies, (7) propose a set of roadmaps for upgrading ULPs in IOMS, (8) implement various research artefacts in real-case scenarios, and (9) rigorously evaluate outcomes both from academic and industrial aspects. The evaluation process is based on Hevner et al.???s methodology for assessing DSR artefacts, and includes the collective application of multiple complementary evaluation methods, supported by a continuous and prompt return of feedback into IADR cycles. While each research artefact is promoted as independent and individually implementable, their interweaving nature is reflected in the fact they are holistically conceived and implemented, and simultaneously evaluated. The implementation, and evaluation of these artefacts were executed in the context of two large international organisations with complex IOMS, large B2B capabilities, and significant IOIS investments. Research findings were published and presented in renowned conferences for further feedback, culminating in the publication of eleven papers.

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  • Review of the book: Progressives at War: William G. McAdoo and Newton D. Baker, 1863-1941, by Douglas B. Craig

    Taillon, Paul (2015-07)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Dwelling within political violence: Palestinian women's narratives of home, mental health, and resilience.

    Sousa, CA; Kemp, Susan; El-Zuhairi, M (2014-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Political violence is increasingly played out within everyday civilian environments, particularly family homes. Yet, within the literature on political violence and mental health, the role of threats to home remains under-explored. Using focus group data from 32 Palestinian women, this paper explores the implications of violations to the home within political violence. Threats to the privacy, control, and constancy of the family home ??? key dimensions of ontological security (Giddens, 1990) emerged as central themes in women???s narratives. Surveillance, home invasions, and actual or threatened destruction of women???s home environments provoked fear, anxiety, grief, humiliation, and helplessness, particularly as women struggled to protect their children. Women also described how they mobilized the home for economic, familial and cultural survival. Study findings illuminate the impact of threats to intimate environments on the well-being of women and their families living with chronic political violence, and underscore the importance of attention to violations of place and home in research on civilian experiences of and responses to political violence.

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  • Response: Social work, science, social impact: Crafting an integrative conversation

    Nurius, SP; Kemp, Susan (2012-09-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Shifts in the ways that science is being undertaken and marshaled toward social change argue for a new kind of professional competence. Taking the view that the science of social work is centrally about the relationship of research to social impact, the authors extend Fong???s focus on transdisciplinary and translational approaches to science, illustrating ways that national and international priorities are exerting enormous influence in structures for and expectations of science relevant to social work. The authors also emphasize the growing centrality of transformational research, focusing in particular on the interdependence of education and impact. The intent is to stimulate reflectiveness regarding social work???s preparedness to support and indeed amplify a robust culture of high impact science, including more confident, clearly articulated roles and skills in this contemporary scientific landscape.

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  • Strengths-based practice and parental engagement in child welfare services: An empirical examination

    Kemp, Susan; Marcenko, MO; Lyons, SJ; Kruzich, JM (2014-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Child welfare policy and practice increasingly emphasize the use of strength-based practice in concert with efforts to reduce identified risks to child safety. Compared with strategies for assessing risk, however, strength-based child welfare interventions lack a robust empirical foundation. Using data from a linked sample of primary caregivers (n = 679) and child welfare caseworkers (n = 327), the present study used path analysis to examine the relationship between parent report of workers' use of strength-based practice and parent investment in child welfare services. The study also examined the role of worker characteristics, organizational factors, child placement status, and parent risk factors. As hypothesized, parents' perceptions regarding their workers' use of strength-based practices robustly predicted their buy-in to services. Furthermore, those parents with a child in out-of-home placement, compared to those receiving in-home services, were less likely to perceive their worker as strength-based or to engage in services. The only significant organizational variable was workers' positive challenge, directly influencing strength-based practices and indirectly affecting parent engagement. Further, parents who reported using substances and those experiencing more economic hardship were more likely to buy-in to services. The findings provide empirical support for the link between parents' willingness to engage in services and the use of strength-based interventions, and contribute to current discussions regarding the appropriate balance between reducing risks to child safety and strengthening family capacities.

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  • Preparing emerging doctoral scholars for transdisciplinary research: A developmental approach

    Kemp, Susan; Nurius, PS (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Research models that bridge disciplinary, theoretical, and methodological boundaries are increasingly common as funders and the public push for effective responses to pressing social problems. Although social work is inherently an integrative discipline, there is growing recognition of the need to better prepare emerging scholars for sophisticated transdisciplinary and translational research environments. This article outlines a developmental, competency-oriented approach to enhancing the readiness of doctoral students and emerging scholars in social work and allied disciplines for transdisciplinary research, describes an array of pedagogical tools applicable in doctoral course work, and urges coordinated attention to enhancing the field???s transdisciplinary training capacity.

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  • Review of the book: Free Labor. The Civil War and the Making of an American Working Class, by Mark A. Lause

    Taillon, Paul (2016-12)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of the book: Weavers of Dreams, Unite! Actors' Unionism in Early Twentieth-Century America, by Sean P. Holmes

    Taillon, Paul (2014-06-01)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Review of the book: Theodore Roosevelt and the American Political Tradition, by Jean M. Yarbrough

    Taillon, Paul (2013-08)

    Unclassified
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • The maintenance of Maori classical literature on the marae

    Edmonds, Catherine (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The marae and the institutions of tangihanga (funereal customs) have maintained and sustained the M??ori language, its attendant culture and the M??ori classical literature that survives today. On these occasions the M??ori world view is given full expression in an authentic setting in the 21st century. Tangihanga (or tangi) therefore play an important role in sustaining M??ori identity. This article provides an annotated account of the tangi process that demonstrates the M??ori world view, gives examples of specific oral literatures from the classical M??ori world, and notes educational aspects of how traditional M??ori knowledge and language is transmitted and acquired during the tangi process.

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  • Introduction

    Abbenhuis, Maartje (2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Should the teaching of the Holocaust be compulsory in New Zealand schools?

    Abbenhuis, Maartje (2016-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • Sensing and monitoring technologies for mines and hazardous areas, by G.M. Chaulya & S. Prasad, 2016.

    Brook, Martin (2017-06)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

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  • HbA1c as a marker of prediabetes: a reliable screening tool or not?

    Sequeira, Ivana; Poppitt, Sally (2017-04-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Increasing global prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) has resulted in concerted efforts to improve predictors for development of this obesity-related disorder. Establishing markers that identify prediabetes, an intermediary state of glycaemia above that of healthy individuals but below frank T2D, is an important focus. International cut offs have long been based on the 2 h WHO-defined oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), but more recent use of the quicker and cheaper marker of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) has become widespread in clinical practice and public health. The definition of people with prediabetes in turn has expanded from those with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) to include individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and/or raised HbA1c. Whilst HbA1c has been recommended since 2010 for both T2D and prediabetes screening, concerns have been raised over validity particularly for identifying those who will later develop T2D. Depending on criteria, HbA1c may identify only 50% with abnormal OGTT or misclassify those with normal physiology. Models predicting average time intervals for progression to T2D from prediabetes are commonly limited by ethnic, racial and gender differences, and different criteria further result in variable estimates of prediabetes prevalence and impact those eligible for lifestyle interventions. Whilst HbA1c may provide a good marker of frank T2D, some recommend its use in prediabetes only in conjunction with fasting plasma glucose (FPG). This review updates current opinion on HbA1c as an effective screening method for categorising high-risk prediabetic individuals and those requiring fast track into lifestyle modification programs.

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  • Obesity and Weight Control: Is There Light at the End of the Tunnel?

    Poppitt, Sally (2017)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Purpose of Review Our global population recently arrived at the landmark figure of seven billion, and the nutrition problems we face are increasing as rapidly, with the longstanding crisis of undernutrition joined by the escalating problem of overconsumption and obesity. Over the past 30 years, it has become clear that control of body weight is as simple as matching energy intake to expenditure, yet how to achieve this in the current obesigenic environment is far from simple. A review of causative mechanisms shows controlling eating behaviour and food intake as central to regulation of body weight, but in an environment where the need to suppress intake is uppermost, there are few physiological mechanisms with which to tackle this. Recent Findings Macronutrient composition, energy density, food format (beverages), palatability, portion size and hedonics all influence intake and readily promote overeating. Currently, the most successful obesity treatment is restrictive bariatric surgery, both invasive and expensive, achieving better outcomes than diet and exercise. Despite considerable advances, there remains a critical gap in translation of underpinning knowledge into successful public health outcomes, as recently outlined in the 2nd Lancet series in obesity with no country reporting decreased obesity prevalence in the last 30 years. Summary Future contribution may come from better understanding of mechanisms including gut-brain axis and regulation of appetite, the gut microbiome and the genetic underpinning of bodyweight control. Clearly, prevention is the key, with nutrition education required to lead changes in behaviour, and possibly the only viable long-term approach. Whether the global obesity trend can be reversed without significant change in national food policies and/or the built environment however is under debate, and without doubt a major public health challenge for tomorrow if there is to be light at the end of the obesity tunnel.

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  • Social work using information and communication technology

    Beddoe, Elizabeth (2016)

    Book item
    The University of Auckland Library

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