43,524 results for 2010

  • It's Your Shout! A New Way of Measuring Use Wear on Glass Bottles

    Platts, Maeve (2018)

    Masters thesis
    University of Otago

    It was not until 1922 that glass manufacturing was available in New Zealand and prior to this, glass bottles were considered valuable and useful objects. This lack of glass encouraged reuse. Reuse has implications for consumption analyses and the interpretation of bottle glass assemblages but to date there has been no systematic method of documenting this. The following research examines if it is possible to quantify evidence of wear on glass bottles in a way that can be applied to archaeological specimens. With the presumption that continued use of a bottle will leave physical evidence, a scale was produced for measuring the use wear on glass bottles. The scale was then employed on five different sites located in Christchurch. These sites consisted of a warehouse/brewery, a pub/inn, a bottle exchange and two domestic sites. The aim was to discover if it was possible to measure use wear on glass bottles and to see if there was any variation in the extent of use wear and, therefore reuse, within these sites and among different bottle types. This enabled the results to be used to contribute to a broader interpretation of the social life of Victorian Christchurch with an emphasis on the drinking culture of the time.

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  • New Zealand’s National Standards policy: How should we view it a decade on?

    Thrupp, Martin (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this short article, I consider how teachers might judge the National Standards system these days and also how the policy might be understood more generally. These are important questions coming up to the 2017 election because the National Standards system has been such a central feature of the current Government’s approach to education. Teachers will be aware of teacher and principal colleagues who are supportive of National Standards while others are much less so. Conflicting views amongst teachers and principals about the value of the National Standards is also apparent from a recent New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) national survey (Bonne, 2016). School websites indicate diverse views as well. There are some primary school websites that reflect enthusiasm about National Standards and some that barely mention them.

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  • Quantifying macrodetritus fluxes from a small temperate estuary

    Gladstone-Gallagher, Rebecca Vivian; Sandwell, Dean R.; Lohrer, Andrew M.; Lundquist, Carolyn J.; Pilditch, Conrad A. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Empirical measurements of estuary-to-coast material fluxes usually exclude the fraction of primary production that is exported as macrodetritus (marine plant litter), potentially leaving a gap in our understanding of the role of estuaries as outwelling systems. To address this gap, we sampled water and suspended material seasonally from the mouth of Pepe Inlet, Tairua Estuary, New Zealand. From samples collected hourly over 24 h, we calculated the lateral tidal fluxes (import, export, net flux) of macrodetritus, particulate and dissolved forms of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Annually, the inlet was a net exporter of N and P (5145 and 362 kg respectively). However, macrodetritus accounted for 87%). Nevertheless, seasonal pulses in the source and supply of macrodetritus may have consequences for the temporal scales over which this resource subsidy affects receiving ecosystems (e.g. intertidal sandflats). These mensurative investigations are useful to inform estuarine nutrient budgets that quantify the ecosystem services provided by temperate estuaries (e.g. contribution to fisheries food webs).

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  • Getting students to engage with readings

    Weijers, Dan M. (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Ever wondered how many of your students attempt or complete their readings? Ever worried that when students do attempt the readings that they fail to remember or even understand the important points? If we are to implement a flipped approach to our teaching, then we need our students to be able to read complex texts independently. I will discuss a strategy that I use in my philosophy classes to train students into becoming independent readers, and encourage them to complete all of the reading set for the class.

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  • Introduction—‘Nine years of National-led education policy’

    Thrupp, Martin (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    It is a pleasure to guest-edit this special issue on ‘Nine Years of National-led Education Policy’. As the journal of the faculty where I have worked for much of my career, I am rather fond of the Waikato Journal of Education. One of my earliest papers was published in the very first issue. That article was on the politics of scapegoating schools and teachers for wider socio-economic problems (Thrupp, 1995). It has been a theme that my work has come back to repeatedly and is mentioned in this introduction as well.

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  • How volunteering reduced the impact of the Rena oil spill: Community responses to an environmental disaster

    Hamerton, Heather; Sargisson, Rebecca J.; Smith, Kelly; Hunt, Sonya (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Following the Rena oil spill off the Bay of Plenty coast in New Zealand and subsequent volunteer clean-up programme, we interviewed 39 volunteers and 9 people involved in the volunteer organisation. We aimed to learn about people’s responses to an environmental disaster, what factors motivate people to volunteer, and how volunteering after a disaster assists individuals and communities to adjust to changing circumstances. The oil spill had an emotional, physical, cultural, social and spiritual impact on both individuals and communities. People were motivated to volunteer from a sense of duty and history of volunteering, a concern and sense of collective responsibility for the environment for current and future generations, a desire to contribute to their community, and to connect with others and cope with their negative responses. There was a strong typical New Zealand “can do” response in that volunteers expressed they had time and capability to help so they just wanted to get on with it. After volunteering, most participants reported a sense of satisfaction, renewed social ties, and renewed optimism. The clean-up programme brought communities together, resulting in timely removal of oil from beaches and coastline and demonstrating that citizen volunteers can contribute to oil spill mitigation.

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  • Universal Basic Income and income tax reform

    Rankin, Keith (2017-12-22T13:30:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    The New Zealand Labour Party is investigating, among other things, the adoption of a Universal Basic Income (UBI) as a means of ensuring reduced economic insecurity in the face of an increasingly precarious labour market.It is an essential and long-overdue step, appreciating that increases in productivity should be accompanied by the development of income distribution rules that ensure productivity dividends are equitably shared. The problem today is to manage the politics of rights-based welfare, and the widespread misinformation about such universal income solutions. Misinformation is propagated by overenthusiastic supporters, seeking a revolutionary ‘bigbang’ change that will allow people to choose not to engage with the labour market, and presumptive opponents whorestrict their criticisms to these more utopian (and easily criticised) versions of universal income.

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  • Creating connections between theory and practice for diverse learners

    Lorimer, Naomi; Hurst, Nikki; Rowe, Courtney; Patston, Lucy (2017-10-20T13:30:03Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    For students entering public service fields, such as healthcare and social services, a key skill is the ability to both learn and understand the theoretical underpinnings of their profession and to apply them appropriately in practice (Wrenn & Wrenn, 2009). The Human Development course described in this article is taught using a highly‐blended model, with limited face‐to‐face time, where most feedback is provided online in written format. The students are from programmes as diverse as medical imaging, nursing, coaching and social practice, with a range of educational backgrounds, expectations, and future goals. This paper outlines the process of transitioning this course from a generic, theory‐based course, to one where students create connections between their lived experience and theory, and between theory and professional practice. This was achieved through a combination of innovative teaching practices, drawing on the experiences of students and current practitioners, and creating connections between historical and more recent theories of human development

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  • Expanding the world of theory of constraints

    Mabin, V.J.; Mirzaei, Maryam (2018-01-12T13:30:02Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    AIMS & BACKGROUND Aim • to bridge gap between academics and practitioners and to hold a mirror to see what outsiders see of TOC (what is available to academic researchers on TOC? What view are we presenting to the academic world? • Database to record: TOC publications available in the published ‘academic’ literature Follows on from The World of the Theory of Constraints bibliography

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  • Readability of hearing-related information on the Internet in the German language

    Toth, Bernadett (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Purpose: To describe the readability of hearing-related information on the Internet in the German language and compare the readability between webpage origins (by country), type of organisation (i.e., government, non-profit, and commercial), and with and without Health on the Net Foundation (HONcode) certification. Method: Hearing-related search terms were identified using native German-speaking informants. The three keywords, Schwerhörigkeit [hard of hearing], Hörtest [hearing test], and Hörgerät [hearing aid], were checked with Google Trends and then entered into five country code top-level domain (ccTLD) versions of the Google search engine (Google.de; Google.at; Google.ch; Google.li; and Google.hu). The first 10 retrieved webpages, that matched the inclusion criteria, were documented for each key word along with their webpage origins, type of organisation, date of last update, and HONcode certification. After removing duplicates, from the total of 150 webpages, 39 webpages remained from four ccTLDs. These webpages were analysed for readability using the Läsbarhetsindex 1 (LIX 1) [readability index 1], Läsbarhetsindex 2 - German technical literature (LIX 2) [readability index 2]; Quadratwurzelverfahren (Qu) [square root process], Rate index 1 (RIX 1), and Rate index 2 - German non-fiction (RIX 2); and the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook 1 (SMOG 1) readability formulas (RFs) provided by the Readability Studio software 2012.1 that generated the reading grade levels (RGLs). Descriptive statistics were computed to describe the readability of hearing-related information on the Internet in the German language, and any differences between readability formulas. Univariate and non-parametric ANOVA were used to determine whether there are significant differences in hearing-related information between webpages with, and without, HONcode certification. Results: The different RFs consistently showed that readability levels for the assessed webpages exceeded the recommended 6th RGL. All webpages analysed in this study had a mean RGL of 12 which was not significantly different based on location and type of organisation. Seventy-seven percent of the webpages were of commercial origin and 23% nonprofit. No government webpages were retrieved by the ccTLDs. The date of last update on 67% of the webpages was not documented. The location of organisation for most webpages was in Germany. Eighty-two percent of the assessed webpages did not have HONcode certification but, most of the webpages that did have HONcode certification were of commercial origin. RGLs did not significantly differ based on HONcode certification. Conclusion: The readability of hearing-related information on the Internet in the German language is above the 12th grade level, that is, readers need on average 12 years of education to be able to comprehend the information: however, the limitations of the different RFs, and the software used for the analysis, need to be kept in mind when interpreting results because they can artificially influence the RGL results. Due to the increasing number of people who seek health information online, further studies are needed to investigate whether the online health information in the German language informs or misinforms adults with hearing impairment (HI). The clinical implications of poor readability for audiologists and other stakeholders are discussed.

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  • Experimental investigation of a zeotropic working fluid and working fluid filling factor on system performance in a small-scale ORC

    Wijninckx, Richard (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) systems are capable of utilising low-enthalpy heat sources to generate power. For the performance engineering of ORC systems, it is important to understand process parameters and component behaviour. To maximise performance, modelling of the plant thermodynamics must be coupled with data analysis to develop diagnostic procedures, find optimal operating points, and diagnose problems to schedule the most cost effective maintenance. An existing ORC system at the University of Canterbury has been upgraded from a previous iteration to assist in furthering our knowledge of ORC system design and construction. This paper presents experimental results from running a 1 kW ORC system using HFC-M1 refrigerant, a zeotropic mixture of R245fa and R365mfc, as the working fluid under a wide range of operating conditions. Hot exhaust combustion products from a 30kW CapstoneTM Gas Turbine are used as the heat source, and heat is transferred via a thermal oil loop to the working fluid through a plate heat exchanger. A scroll expander magnetically coupled to an AC generator is used for work extraction and energy conversion. Trials focused on testing the full range of performance, and investigated the effect of a zeotropic working fluid, and the influence of varying the working fluid liquid level on system performance. Trials were prematurely ended by bearing failure in the ORC scroll expander. However, analysis of the results from additional tests suggest the working fluid charge in the system influences operation, corroborating findings in literature. While inconclusive, these initial results support the need for further testing the effect of the DVR in a fully functioning system. A comparative study was performed between the system actual performance and the theoretical performance to evaluate the degree of impact of the operational issues on the system performance. The unit was disassembled to evaluate the component compatibility and assess functionality over the operation. It transpired the system mass was not conserved during the operation due to leakage, contributing to the overall deterioration in system performance over time. It is concluded the zeotropic mixture was chemically incompatible with system components leading to system failure. Critiques of components and working fluid, derived from experiences in operating the system, coupled with general trends produced by the results, provide recommendations for the design and testing of future small-scale ORC systems.

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  • Crossroads: commemorative names in East Berlin, 1990–2010

    Vogel, Gary (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The memorial landscape has been a focal point in recent studies concentrating on postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe. This thesis contributes to this field by examining the names, naming, and renaming of former German Democratic Republic (GDR) streets, squares, and parks in East Berlin between 1990 and 2010. Political aspirations to influence Germany’s national memory and identity have been overtly present in the alteration of East Berlin’s memorial landscape. Contrasting narratives in the cityscape emerged as each political party –Christian Democratic Union (CDU), Party of Democratic Socialism (PDS), and the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD)– assumed authority in the process of naming and renaming. While the political parties had overt control in the process, these debates over commemorative names was also taken up by and affected the lives of ordinary citizens. This thesis applies Owen Dwyer and Derek Alderman’s holistic approach to reading Mitte and Prenzlauer Berg’s landscape to analyse how inherited socialist dedications were re-interpreted (text), debated (arena), and protested (performance). A number of case studies in two East Berlin districts, Mitte and Prenzlauer Berg, highlight the competing versions of the past that emerged after the demise of the GDR. Mitte became a locus of contention in the battle over commemorative naming because the district was the political centre of a new German democracy. Prenzlauer Berg, a neighbouring district of Mitte, underwent similar disputes over its inherited GDR commemorative names but had very different outcomes. The aim of such a comparative study is to exemplify the power struggles surrounding commemorative names and how political parties and ordinary citizens use them to claim the right to retell the past.

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  • Social media and e-learning in response to seismic events : resilient practices

    Tull, S. P. C.; Dabner, N.; Ayebi-Arthur, K. (2017-10-12T13:30:07Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The motivation to adopt innovative communication and e-learning practices in education settings can be stimulated by events such as natural disasters. Education institutions in the Pacific Rim cannot avoid the likelihood of natural disasters that could close one or more buildings on a campus and affect their ability to continue current educational practices. For the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, the impetus to innovate was a series of seismic events in 2010 and 2011. This paper presents findings from studies that identified resilient practices in this organisation, which was a ‘late adopter’ of e-learning. The findings indicate that the combined use of social media and e-learning to support teaching, learning, communication, and related organisational practices fosters resilience for students, staff, and organisations in times of crises. The recommendations presented are relevant for all educational organisations that could be affected by similar events.

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  • Hard rock tunnel boring machine penetration test as an indicator of chipping process efficiency

    Villeneuve MC (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    © 2017 Institute of Rock and Soil Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The transition from grinding to chipping can be observed in tunnel boring machine (TBM) penetration test data by plotting the penetration rate (distance/revolution) against the net cutter thrust (force per cutter) over the full range of penetration rates in the test. Correlating penetration test data to the geological and geomechanical characteristics of rock masses through which a penetration test is conducted provides the ability to reveal the efficiency of the chipping process in response to changing geological conditions. Penetration test data can also be used to identify stress-induced tunnel face instability. This research shows that the strength of the rock is an important parameter for controlling how much net cutter thrust is required to transition from grinding to chipping. It also shows that the geological characteristics of a rock will determine how efficient chipping occurs once it has begun. In particular, geological characteristics that lead to efficient fracture propagation, such as fabric and mica contents, will lead to efficient chipping. These findings will enable a better correlation between TBM performance and geological conditions for use in TBM design, as a basis for contractual payments where penetration rate dominates the excavation cycle and in further academic investigations into the TBM excavation process.

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  • UBI as a reconceptualisation of income tax

    Rankin, Keith (2017-12-22T13:30:26Z)

    Unclassified
    Unitec

    I am worried that too much of the recent talk around the introduction of a universal basic income has been unhelpful. The concept – defined in 1991 – is still not understood by the politicians and journalists who represent the public's main source of information about policy options. In 1991 I introduced the subject thus: "a universal tax credit available to every adult - the universal basic income (UBI) - and a moderately high flat taxrate", in my University of Auckland Policy Discussion Paper. Through this approach, the basic income can be understood as an alternative form of progressivity of the income tax system, as distinct from the traditional stepwise graduations of income tax rates that we are familiar with. In the newer 'public equity' approach which I have emphasised since 2008, the basic income represents an alternative to income-tax progression rather than a form of progression. It adopts sound equity principles that render the need for tax progressivity redundant. While in monetary terms the result is the same, the public equity concept has the greater capacity to bring about the reconceptualisation of income that twenty-first century economies desperately require. Here I will outline a simple four-step approach to the implementation of the requisite reforms. Any critique of 'universal basic income' needs to address these four steps. I am confident that this implementation programme is immune from any substantial criticism on the usual grounds of affordability and work incentives. It is intellectually dishonest for politicians and journalists to confine their critiques to proposals that are easy targets;proposals that are extreme, unimplementable, or not thought through

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  • Robots and racism

    Bartneck C; Yogeeswaran K; Ser QM; Woodward G; Sparrow R; Wang S; Eyssel F (2018)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Most robots currently being sold or developed are either stylized with white material or have a metallic appearance. In this research we used the shooter bias paradigm and several questionnaires to investigate if people automatically identify robots as being racialized, such that we might say that some robots are “White” while others are “Asian”, or “Black”. To do so, we conducted an extended replication of the classic social psychological shooter bias paradigm using robot stimuli to explore whether effects known from humanhuman intergroup experiments would generalize to robots that were racialized as Black and White. Reaction-time based measures revealed that participants demonstrated ‘shooter-bias’ toward both Black people and robot racialized as Black. Participants were also willing to attribute a race to the robots depending on their racialization and demonstrated a high degree of inter-subject agreement when it came to these attributions.

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  • When going digital is inevitable: a multidimensional view of newspaper managers’ responses to newswork change

    Shao, Wei (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    This is an empirical inquiry about managing newswork change in newspaper organisations. It addresses a basic issue for the sustainability of newspapers: How do newspaper managers deal with newswork changes at a time of uncertainty and complexity? Media management focuses predominantly on the business and audience aspects of the newspaper's operation, with less attention to the professional and social aspects of managing newswork. Media management is not an established academic field, despite its growing popularity and progress in the past two decades. In the scholarship, there is a tendency to apply multidisciplinary knowledge to understand media change. However, many scholars simply 'import' organisational and management theory without questioning the relevance of the theory to their research on newswork. Drawing upon case studies at three newspaper organisations, this research examines three characteristics distinctive of newspaper organisations — the newspaper as a business with dual goals, news organising as institutionalised and professionalised processes, and newswork as a time machine, so as to explicate the contexts, content and processes of managing newswork during strategic change. It develops Pettigrew's theoretical framework of understanding organisational change by incorporating the sensemaking and sensegiving perspectives, and offers a new perspective on the managing of newswork during strategic change. The results show that there is a recurring story in the three cases — namely change is emergent, and people’s views on change impact the strategic performance of newspaper organisations. Specifically, newspaper organisation is an emergent environment in which managing and doing newswork are parts of the same strategic processes, and that, therefore, they cannot be treated and studied as separate managerial entities. Applying the sensemaking and related process perspectives, the managing of newswork is understood as a social process of enactment in which both managers and journalists make and give meanings to their practices and in turn make the strategic change — which is emergent, incremental, and idiosyncratic in nature — meaningful and sustainable. This thesis concludes that during the strategic change, sensemaking about newswork has positive impacts on strategic performances only when the social goal of newswork is addressed simultaneously with the business goal, the past experiences and lessons gained by strategy doers on the frontline are valued and backed up by strategy makers, and when managers give the time and space which allow quality journalism to be achieved. These findings and the novel research design employed contribute to journalism, organisational change, and media management fields of research.

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  • Measurement of patient anxiety in MRI - comparing VR simulation to a questionnaire.

    Figg, Helen (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a widely used, expensive procedure to obtain detailed images of the human body for diagnosis of many medical conditions. The quality of the images is significantly affected by movement of the patient, with some images even being rendered unsuitable for use. This is important because of the substantial cost involved in use of the scanner and clinical support of the patient. To minimize the risk of anxious movement causing a failed scan, some patients are sedated using medicine, however it may be that this is sometimes unnecessary. Only those who undergo an MRI without sedation first, will know if sedation was required, incurring significant cost. This master thesis project investigates a new low-cost technology option, the use of a fully immersive virtual reality (VR) simulation of the medical procedure itself as a means to estimate patient response. A prototype is developed and tested in a user study, first in the lab with volunteers, and then with MRI hospital staff on site. Once refined, the virtual reality simulation is offered to patients immediately prior to their scheduled MRI scan. Patient anxiety levels are recorded throughout the VR and MRI procedure to gain a clearer understanding of stress profiles of individual patients. The main question is whether VR is useful in predicting anxiety of patients during MRI. Results showed that there was a strong correlation between patient anxiety in VR and in MRI but also, if VR were removed a strong correlation existed between before MRI and during MRI. Both significantly predicted average anxiety during MRI, with VR accounting for 71.4% of anxiety during MRI of which 58.8% could be predicted by using anxiety before any scan. The main effect of exposure showed that there was no statistically significant difference in anxiety level between those who had VR and those who did not. The main effect of stage showed there was no statistically significant difference between anxiety level at the different time points of the scan. Overall anxiety level data showed no statistically significant interaction.

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  • Additive Manufacturing of Catalyst Substrates for Steam–Methane Reforming

    Kramer M; McKelvie M; Watson MJ (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Steam–methane reforming is a highly endothermic reaction, which is carried out at temperatures up to 1100 C and pressures up to 3000 kPa, typically with a Ni-based catalyst distributed over a substrate of discrete alumina pellets or beads. Standard pellet geometries (spheres, hollow cylinders) limit the degree of mass transfer between gaseous reactants and catalyst. Further, heat is supplied to the exterior of the reactor wall, and heat transfer is limited due to the nature of point contacts between the reactor wall and the substrate pellets. This limits the degree to which the process can be intensified, as well as limiting the diameter of the reactor wall. Additive manufacturing now gives us the capability to design structures with tailored heat and mass transfer properties, not only within the packed bed of the reactor, but also at the interface between the reactor wall and the packed bed. In this work, the use of additive manufacturing to produce monolithic-structured catalyst substrate models, made from acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene, with enhanced conductive heat transfer is described. By integrating the reactor wall into the catalyst substrate structure, the effective thermal conductivity increased by 34% from 0.122 to 0.164 W/(m K).

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  • Any Time, Any Place, Flexible Pace: Technology-Enhanced Language Learning in a Teacher Education Programme

    Howard J; Scott A (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Abstract: Ongoing developments in e-learning, improved internet accessibility and increased digital citizenry provide exciting opportunities to integrate effective classroom pedagogies with online educational technologies, creating mixed-mode courses to enhance student engagement and facilitate greater autonomous learning. This research examines pre-service teacher education students’ perceptions of the effectiveness of experiential and digitally-mediated tools which take them beyond the constraints of traditional lecturetype delivery. Quantitative and qualitative results from distance and face-to-face cohorts show the value the students ascribe to tools employed in a modified language course. These are discussed in relation to reported changes in students’ proficiency in the target language and culture, and their teaching confidence, using principles for effective instructed language learning as an interpretive lens. The data provide valuable insights into features that enhanced the students’ digitally-mediated learning experiences in this blended delivery course, including the impact of when, where and how they could engage with course material.

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