9,317 results for Massey Research Online

  • Corporate blue : a novel presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in English, Massey University

    Myers, Daniel

    Thesis
    Massey University

    My first day on the job with those nutcases, I was greeted by the loser's end of a very large handgun. Were I a more intuitive man, I could have taken that as a sign to just turn around and walk away. Leave that place and never think of it again. It would've been the wise thing to do. In my own defence however, I could point out that I didn't have a lot of options as to where I could turn. The President of the United States, among others, was pissed-off with me. And I had promised myself that I would make the best of this new situation in a new country. In time-I figured a year max-I was sure they would all forgive me back in America and let me come home.

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  • Development of a real-time operator training simulator for falling film evaporators : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology in Engineering and Automation at Massey University

    Goodwin, Shane

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The Chinese say, "Experience is the only teacher", while an old Western proverb is "Practice makes perfect". In either form, the notion is identical - the more often a task is performed, or a problem confronted, the better it is handled. In the arena of process control involving human operators, the effects of a mistake can be extremely costly to the company. One way to reduce the frequency and severity of mistakes by an operator is to provide training, ideally on a simulation of the process rather than the process itself. This allows the operator to make mistakes and hopefully learn from them, without the company having to lose revenue, lower efficiency, or produce waste product. An operator normally controls a process by changing the settings in a piece of software, which in turn affects the operation of the plant. However, that control software is operating on a machine which is also perfect for modelling and calculating the responses of the process in question. Software to control a process is readily available in a multitude of incarnations and so are packages designed to create models of a process. Used in conjunction, a model-based simulator can be created in order to train operators.

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  • Biochemical and structural characterization of Streptococcus pyogenes C5a peptidase: a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Biochemistry at Massey University

    Mouat, Pania Dawn

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococci, is a common causative agent of bacterial infections of the human upper respiratory tract, skin, and soft tissue. Non-suppurative sequelae of S. pyogenes infections include rheumatic fever, rheumatic heart disease, and acute glomerulonephritis. Recently there has been a resurgence of rheumatic fever and rheumatic heart disease as well as an increase in aggressive streptococcal disease such as toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis. S. pyogenes produce a formidable array of virulence factors, one of which is C5a peptidase. The human complement factor C5a is a potent chemoattractant, macrophage activator, and an anaphylatoxin. The C5a peptidase of both Group A Streptococci and Group B Streptococci cleave C5a within its polymorphonuclear neutrophil binding site rendering it inactive. Mouse infection models have demonstrated a functional C5a peptidase assists colonization by retarding the infiltration of phagocytes to the foci of infection. C5a peptidase is a multidomain cell surface subtilisin-like serine protease (subtilase) with an Asp, His, and Ser catalytic triad. Comparative sequence analysis shows C5a peptidase has considerable sequence homology to Lactococcus lactis PrtP, both of which are highly specific endopeptidases. Whereas the subtilisins in general show broad substrate specificity profiles, the cell envelope proteinases of lactic acid bacteria demonstrate remarkable substrate specificity. The greater specificity of the cell envelope proteinases is held attributable to changes in variable regions within the structurally conserved regions and the presence of the A-domain, both of which have been demonstrated to modify specificity in PrtP proteinases. The aims of this project were to study the structural and biochemical properties of the C5a peptidase of Streptococcus pyogenes. C5a peptidase and variants were cloned, expressed, purified, and assayed for activity in under-agarose lymphocyte migration assays and in vitro digestion assays. Absence of activity was found in a C5a peptidase variant in which the A-domain was absent. Purified recombinant C5a peptidase and derivatives were screened for crystallization conditions. Crystallization conditions were found for recombinant C5a peptidase. To combat both the increasing incidence of S. pyogenes associated diseases, and increasing antibiotic resistance, new chemotherapeutic agents are required. This study was designed to elucidate the structural and biochemical basis of the substrate specificity of C5a peptidase, which will assist the design of potent inhibitors of this powerful virulence factor.

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  • Chromium (III) complexes and their relationship to the glucose tolerance factor : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Chemistry at Massey University

    Cooper, Juan Anton

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Two forms of the dinicotinate complex Cr(nic)2(H2O)3OH were formed which were yellow and blue, respectively. For the yellow form the nicotinic acid ligands were coordinated via the pyridine ring nitrogen atom but this complex was biologically inactive, while for the blue form nicotinic acid was coordinated via the carboxylate group and this compound was biologically active. Only Cr(III) formed a stable carboxylate coordinated dinicotinate complex. No stable complexes were formed with Fe(III) and Mn(III) due to significant olation, even at acidic pH's, and the complexes of nicotinic acid with Cr(II), Mn(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) were all pyridine nitrogen atom coordinated and biologically inactive. Several chromium (III) complexes with amino acids possessed biological activity also, and these included the α -carboxylate coordinated species Cr(gly)n(H2O)3+6-nand Cr(glu)n(H2O)3+6-n, the bidentate coordinated Cr(gln)2(H2O)2+ complex, and the NH4OH- eluted complexes obtained when Cr(gly)2(H2O)2+ and Cr(glu)2(H2O) 2+, but not Cr(cys) 2(H2O) 2+, were eluted from a DOWEX 50W-X12 cation-exchange column (loss of the α-amino coordination was postulated to have occurred). The biologically active mixed ligand complex postulated as Cr2(nic) 4(gly) 2(OH) 2 was prepared and found to be stable at neutral pH as a result of coordination of the glycine ligands. The activity of the chromium (III) complexes in the yeast fermentation assay suggested that similar effects would be found in mammalian systems. The yeast assay system was found to be a simple, quick and reproducible method of determining biological activity. All of the active chromium (III) complexes prepared were found to be similar, in structure, to the diguanide compound 1,4-diguanidinobutane which is known to lower blood sugar levels in mammals. This similarity in structure suggested a similar function might be possessed by the complexes reported in this thesis

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  • Circuits of power : a study of the development of computer software and its use in general medical practice : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Sociology at Massey University

    Cornford, Elizabeth Phillipa

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis explores several phases in the life history of a software package developed in New Zealand for the primary healthcare market in order to show how the package is implicated in maintaining or changing existing distributions of power. The theoretical concepts which inform the study come primarily from Wiebe Bijker who works within the constructivist tradition of technology studies. The methods include documentary research and fieldwork, including open-ended interviews with five people involved with the package at the development site and seven who work in large and small general practice sites. The study concludes that the introduction of computers into general medical practice is associated with a small shift in the balance of power within general practice which has significant consequences for those who are unable or unwilling to acquire computing expertise. It also concludes that computerisation of general practice is associated with changes in the autonomy of general practitioners as their work becomes open to greater surveillance and in the GP-patient relationship where the computer has the capacity to substantially alter the nature of the interaction. The main findings of the study are that the groups most influential in the development of the package continue to exercise their influence as the package is deployed and used in a general practice setting. In this way the package both reflects and reinforces their power as it moves between development and use. The study also shows that those most influential in all phases of the package's existence draw on a number of skills and resources such as business acumen, clinical knowledge and computing expertise but that the most significant resource is money in the form of purchasing power or economic authority.

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  • An approach to a field drainage problem by laboratory examination of selected properties of undisturbed soil cores : thesis presented at Massey University of Manawatu in part fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricutural Science

    Baker, Christopher John

    Thesis
    Massey University

    For many years, soil drainage investigators, from a practical view point, have had to content themselves with expert appraisal of certain direct and indirect soil and environmental characteristics in order to ascertain the cause of a particular drainage problem. In a great many instances, observations of vegetative composition, topography and general soil type, aided by aerial photography and local experience, give completely adequate information. Normally, derivation of conclusions from such observations is based on well established principles, and the recognition of general broad classes of the cause of mal-drainage conditions. Such classes may be grouped as; (I) where infiltration capacity of a soil is inadequate to deal with the amount of water supplied to the surface, because of topography, abnormal rainfall, or through inherent inability of the soil to transmit water internally, (II) where the groundwater table rises to a height detrimental to vegetative survival and/or soil structure, or where its presence hinders the function of a free draining subsoil, end (III) where a similar situation exists, due to a perched or elevated ground-water table. The allocation of a particular drainage problem to one or more of these broad classes is not usually difficult, but identification of causal processes within classes presents quite another problem. Often, drainage investigators have been content to evolve general treatments for each class, and, as a basic rule, such procedures have, more often than not, proved reasonably effective. However, with the increasing intensification of pastoral and agricultural farming, the fundamental causes of individual mal-drainage conditions must be positively identified and rectified within the broadly classified groups.

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  • Development and evaluation of molecular tests for investigation of tissue tropism of adenovirus in tissues of brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Veterinary Studies at Massey University

    Lu, Guangjin

    Thesis
    Massey University

    (Trichosurus vulpecula) is considered to be a vertebrate pest, which causes severe damage to the native ecosystem. Biological control, such as immunocontraception, is considered to be the only foreseeable long-term solution to the control of the possum population. Possum adenovirus has been investigated as a possible candidate for use in the biological control of this pest in New Zealand. Attempts to isolate the virus by cell culture have been unsuccessful and could be due to inappropriate culture systems. The localization of adenovirus in possums may be indicative of the tissue tropism of the virus and be helpful in finding the appropriate tissue samples for cell culture. However, this information is not available to date. In this study, the main aim was to establish a sensitive detection method to detect the presence of adenovirus in possum tissues and allow an investigation of tissue tropism. Direct and indirect in situ polymerase chain reaction (in situ PCR) and in situ hybridization (ISH) were established using canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) as a parallel model for optimizing the experimental conditions. The result showed that both in situ PCR and ISH detection systems were able to detect canine adenoviruses in cultured MDCK cells at a low level of infection. In situ PCR methods were able to detect CAdV-1 in MDCK cells at 8 hours after infection with strong staining in the nuclei, while ISH was able to detect CAdV-1 at 14 hours after infection. The same approaches were applied to detect possum adenovirus in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections of possum intestinal tissues using a probe from possum adenovirus hexon gene. However, no possum adenovirus was detected in these tissues. This result indicates that further investigation using the same approach should be applied to other possum tissues. In order to investigate the presence of antibody to possum adenovirus, an agar gel immunodiffusion (AGID) test was established using canine adenovirus type 1 (CAdV-1) as antigen. Possum sera from various regions of New Zealand were obtained from the possum serum bank of this laboratory. Of the 268 sera tested, none of them were antibody positive to CAV-1. This result could be due to the insensitivity of AGID test per se and the absence of the shared cross-reaction antigen between these two viruses, suggesting that further investigation using viruses from the group of atadenovirus as antigen is needed.

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  • Curiouser and curiouser : Margaret Mahy's novels for adolescents : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy at Massey University

    Hensman, Stephen Trevor

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis is a study of the interconnections between Margaret Mahy's novels for adolescents. It argues that whilst interconnected networks infuse the oeuvre with appropriate material for adolescents, some textual elements exceed the limitations of all but the most sophisticated adolescents. After an introductory chapter, Chapter Two proposes a typology of structure in New Zealand novels for adolescents. It finds that Mahy's novels are archetypes of the hope-inducing structures identifiable in New Zealand novels for adolescents generally. It also finds that Mahy adapts structure to the stage of adolescence she is writing for. Chapter Three discusses the generic content and stylistics in the Mahy oeuvre. It argues that even though the content is eminently appropriate for adolescents, some elements of style are not. Chapter Four argues that knowledge of the various networks enriches response, guides interpretation and highlights Mahy's ability to pitch content at an appropriate level for adolescence, but again argues that some subtleties of style are too sophisticated for an adolescent audience. Chapter Five argues that understanding of each novel is expanded by identifying points which imply one reader at the expense of others. Hence, this thesis concludes that meaning and response multiply in Mahy's texts in proportion to (1) knowledge of Mahy's unique interconnecting textual elements and (2) the number of Mahy's implied readers inhering in the actual reader.

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  • Determining the efficacy of organic insecticides and synergists against a range of representative insect and mite pests using a Potter Tower : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Science in Zoology at Massey University

    Wright, Sarah J

    Thesis
    Massey University

    A variety of insecticidal formulations were examined for their efficacy against a range of insects under laboratory conditions using a Potter Tower technique. The insecticides Yates Pyrethrum, Eco-oil, Defender, Orchex, Confidor, Agrimec, Encapsulated Pyrethrum, Encapsulated Pyrethrum and Neem, Azatin, NeemAzal, as well as a combination of the insecticides Azatin plus Eco-oil were tested at both the half as well as the full recommended field rate against a range of insect pests. In addition, the ability to synergise natural pyrethrum by some or all of the natural compounds including sesame oil, the crystalline extract of a sesame oil crude extract, dillapiole, and the synthetic synergist PBO, in spray emulsions at a variety of rates and ratios was examined in tests against the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, passionvine hopper (Scolypopa australis), greenhouse thrip, and lightbrown apple moth. Confidor and Yates Pyrethrum gave marked control ( i.e. mortality > 80%) of the greatest number of test species including the aphid, thrip and mealybug and two of the moth species for Confidor and all of the moth, aphid and thrip species for Yates Pyrethrum. It is suggested that the use of the synthetic synergist PBO could be replaced by the natural synergists including dillapiole, as well as the crystalline extract of a sesame oil crude extract at the highest ratio that was tested against the pea aphid, passionvine hopper, and lightbrown apple moth. Results with greenhouse thrip and tomato fruit worm were inconclusive. A complete summary of the results is given in abstract form for each of the three parts of this dissertation.

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  • Determination of creatinine and creatine by capillary electrophoresis : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Chemistry at Massey University

    Guo, Hong

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The assessment of creatinine and creatine in biological fluids is important in the evaluation of renal and muscular functions. For routine creatinine determinations in the clinical laboratory, the most frequently used method is the spectrophotometric one based on the Jaffé reaction. However, this reaction is not specific for creatinine. For this reason, several methods have been proposed, but the elimination of interferences in the determination of creatinine has still not been achieved in some of these methods; others solved this problem either with expensive equipment that does not suit routine analysis or necessitates time-waste procedures. In this thesis capillary electrophoresis was the new tool investigated. It was applied in an attempt to achieve both the separation of creatinine from the non-creatinine 'Jaffé- reacting' chromogens and the determination of creatine in serum. Capillary zone electrophoresis was performed with detection at wavelength 480 nm to separate creatinine from the non-creatinine 'Jaffé-reacting' chromogens in urine. The principle was based upon the different migration times due to the different molecule weights, molecular sizes and charges under the applied high voltage. The picric acid was employed as part of the running buffer to allow reaction of creatinine and picrate to take place after the sample injection. This procedure eliminated the negative influence of the reaction time that is controlled manually in the common Jaffé reaction method. Therefore, compared to the Jaffé reaction method, the new method achieved more accuracy and precision in the determination of creatinine. Determination of creatinine in serum and urine were studied at a new wavelength 417 nm, which gave a higher sensitivity of detection than at 480 nm. This wavelength shift made the determination of creatinine in serum possible by capillary zone electrophoresis without the non-creatinine 'Jaffé-reacting' chromogens interfering. In this method, serum only needed a simple filtration before the analysis. Creatine was discovered to have absorption at 417 nm in alkaline medium. Moreover, specific sample stacking was introduced in this method. The sample was dissolved in a mixture of two-volumes acetonitrile and one-volume 3 % ammonium chloride to give a 10-fold enhancement of detection sensitivity.

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  • A curriculum review of the farm management course at Highlands Agricultural College, Papua New Guinea : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science at Massey University

    Walep, Victor

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Papua New Guinea P.N.G. is an Agricultural Country with over 85% of the population dependent on subsistence Agriculture for their livelihood. The country derives some 40% of its foreign earnings from Agriculture. Increased agriculture production could not be achieved without input from Agricultural Education and Training. The PNG Government established an Agricultural Education and Training Branch in the early 1960's and successfully maintained this until the mid-eighties when monitoring of curriculum development and evaluation was hampered by poor economic conditions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the curriculum content and, in particular the farm management component of the current Highland Agricultural College (HAC) Post Certificate Diploma (PCD) programme contained suitable and adequate management knowledge and skills training to meet the vocational needs of Rural Development Officers (RDO) To determine these a curricula comparison was made of the farm management curricula from selection of Commonwealth Agricultural Colleges and a survey questionnaire was used to seek responses from graduates of the current PCD training programme together with a small number of certificate graduates. From these studies two areas of training were identified: 1.That an advanced report writing course was needed to provide the knowledge and skills required by RDOs. 2.That an expanded current Feasibility Studies course in the PCD would be necessary to improve the management horizon of individual graduates and to overcome some management weakness experienced by aspiring RDTs.

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  • A critique of deschooling : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Education at Massey University

    Gerve, Juris Robert

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The focus of this study is "deschooling", a concept and a movement which has grown partly out of the crisis in education of the last twenty or so years. Unlike reformers in education, deschoolers demand a paradigmatic shift in the way we view the world. The thrust of their argument is that compulsory schooling, as we know it, is anti-educational and evil in its effects. Schools, even reformed ones, have a hidden curriculum which creates a mental set of dependence on institutions and a propensity for consumption of what the institutions produce. All manipulative institutions must eventually be abolished if mankind is not to squander its finite resources and if man is not to be reduced to a state of psychological impotence through becoming dependent on institutions from birth to death. The school is the key institution in all societies, irrespective of ideology, because it fashions our imagination through the hidden curriculum and because it controls entry to all other institutions. Schools create and perpetuate poverty and inequality, and determine our life chances on irrevelant grounds. Hence the school is the prime target. Without abolishing the schools, there can be no true revolution. The deschoolers propose the creation of convivial institutions. Learning webs where people would be in complete control of what and when and with whom they learn, would replace the compulsory, age-specific, and teacher manipulated structures we have today. The intention of this thesis is to outline the deschoolers' case and to explore the philosophical and theoretical assumptions underlying the concept of deschooling. The manner in which the deschoolers present their case for the abolition of schools, disguises a spectrum of issues which apparently unbeknown to them, philosophers of education have agonized over centuries before the concept of deschooling was coined. Deschoolers raise many arguments against aspects of schooling as if they are breaking new ground. What really is new, is that a number of key philosophical issues (in different terminology) have been marshalled and organised into a cohesive theory about man's nature, the nature and function of mass schooling, and their relationship with a new vision of society. What is also new in a sense, is the solution - the abolition of an institution men have long regarded as unquestionably essential to the survival and growth of present-day civilisation. Certainly anarchists have proposed the liquidation of all institutions, unlike deschoolers who do subscribe to convivial ones, but their respective motivations and views of social reality differ markedly. Beneath the iconoclastic imagery and emotive expressions, the rhetoric and the many seemingly extravagant claims, there is a vision of man and society that deserves to be seriously considered. There are a number of insights which, even if one ultimately rejects deschooling, can be illuminating and which in a sense do fundamentally alter how we view schools. A further aim then of this thesis is to disentangle the empirical issues from the philosophical, so that attention can properly be rivetted on the latter. As mentioned earlier, the issues are certainly not new - they range over the notions of freedom and authority in education, the relationship between teaching and learning, democracy and equality of opportunity, the concept of education, the nature of man, children's rights, the nature of institutions and of schools, the relationship between schools and society, and the nature and limitations of reform as opposed to revolution. The deschoolers' case cannot be justified or invalidated on philosophical grounds alone, for the simple reason that they draw upon a wide base of interwoven sociological, historical, psychological, political and economic arguments to present their conclusions. To dismiss or accept their case according to a strict philosophical analysis would be grossly unfair, for they do not pretend to be writing philosophical works. Consequently no attempt is made to explore all facets of the traditional philosophical concerns deschooling touches upon, but rather to indicate their presence and delineate the philosophical boundaries of the theory.

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  • Discourses of teaching in selected childcare settings : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Education at Massey University

    Robinson, Lesley

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Teachers who work fulltime in community-based childcare settings are responsible for the care and education of children who range in age from babies to children aged 5 years of age. Teachers working in this capacity commonly care for children for extended periods of time, acting 'in loco parentis' as they respond to children throughout the day. Teachers who work in such settings experience their work within a particular working reality. They tend to have shorter holidays, staggered breaks and longer face to face hours with children than others who work with young children in early childhood education. Furthermore, recent moves to professionalize the sector have created increased accountability for all teachers in early childhood education, including those who work in childcare. The present study interviewed 6 teachers who work in community-based settings. Teachers were asked to talk at length about their work. They were encouraged to communicate what their work was like and how they experienced it. They were asked to describe in detail an actual day in their work and to recount particular stories that epitomized their views and their experiences. The interview transcripts were then analysed to make explicit how teachers understood and made meaning in their work. In-depth analysis of the interviews revealed eight discourses that were significant in the teachers' work. These were: a normative mother care discourse, a child-centred discourse, a professional discourse, a team-player discourse, a manager of the day, people and environment discourse, a child-in-context discourse and a forum for care discourse. The particular nature of the discourses that were identified threw light on the work of teachers and the experiences that the teachers consequently had. The discourses were analysed in relation to the current literature and in relation to the material realities of the teachers' work. Certain world-views were seen to be opened up to the teachers from their positions within discourses. The positions that teachers took up in the various discourses were explored in regard to the kinds of relationships that teachers made with children and with parents/whānau and in regard to care of their own self. The study concludes by advocating for increased awareness of the discourses that constitute the work. It is important that teachers understand how certain subject positions are available to them in particular discourses and how these subject positions offer a particular view of the world. Also, as teachers take up positions, certain ways of being with children and with parents open up, and other ways of being with children and parents/whānau close down.

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  • Changing rooms in NICU : a comparative descriptive study of parental perceptions of the physical environment of neonatal intensive care units : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree in Master of Philosophy in Nursing at Massey University

    Wilkinson, Robyn Clare

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The physical environment of a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is unique and can be challenging and stressful for families. As infant survival rates and technology improved, many NICUs became 'busy', overcrowded, noisy environments. New directions in the design of newborn nurseries highlight the potential for the physical environment to support parental needs and optimise the parenting experience. In October 2004 the NICU at National Women's Hospital (NWH) in Auckland (New Zealand), relocated to a new facility at Auckland City Hospital (ACH). A key principle in the design of the new NICU was improvement of family space at the cot side. This non-experimental study sought to describe and compare parental perceptions of the physical environment of a traditional NICU configuration with a new custom built NICU. A sample of parents with infants hospitalised in NICU from NWH (n = 30) and a different group of parents from ACH (n = 30) completed a self report Likert-type questionnaire (with a scale from 1 = strongly disagree to 7 = strongly agree). Qualitative data was sought using open ended questions. Significant differences were found between the old NWH NICU and the newly designed ACH NICU. Parents perception of the space at the cot-side was more adequate (p = 0.001), lighting levels more comfortable (p = 0.002), the cot-side was quieter (p = 0.02) and technology less intrusive (p = 0.03) at ACH NICU when compared to NWH NICU. Impact of these design changes on privacy, sense of belonging, and socialisation of parents did not show significant differences. Lack of cot-side space for NWH parents was the predominate theme from the open-ended questions. Parents viewed the family space and aesthetics of the new ACH rooms positively. Providers of newborn services contemplating redesign need to consider that increasing cot side space and decreasing infant numbers in clinical rooms can significantly improve a parent's view of NICU and therefore provide an environment that is supportive to parent's needs.

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  • Cryopreservation and genetic damage : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Science in Genetics at Massey University

    Major, Ruth Esther

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Blood analysis is time consuming and laboratories may require methods of storing samples until time permits analysis. The effects of storage on the sample are mostly unknown, yet some laboratories commonly store blood samples to allow processing of samples in batches. Cryopreservation is proposed as a convenient means of preserving blood samples, as the associated cold temperatures render cryopreservation an ideal storage method for tests requiring viable cells. In the literature, few studies have explored whether cryopreserved whole blood samples can be utilised effectively for cytogenetic testing. This study extended the work on cryopreservation of blood to observe the cytogenetic effects of storing whole blood samples for an extended period. In this study three cytogenetic tests: Sister Chromatid Exchange (SCE), Micronucleus Assay (MN) and Fluorescence in situ Hybridisation (FISH) were conducted on whole blood samples from ten participants to observe whether the results from the cytogenetic tests are statistically consistent over a prolonged period of cryopreservation (fresh, one month, three months and six months). These tests were conducted on a single blood sample cryopreserved from each participant. The results indicated that cryopreservation of whole blood is not a reliable method for storing blood samples prior to cytomolecular tests. The culturing of lymphocytes from cryopreserved blood was found to be inconsistent and the lymphocyte viability after cryopreservation reduced. When lymphocytes were successfully cultured, SCE and MN demonstrated increased genetic damage after a period of cryopreservation (P= <0.050 and P= 0.016 respectively) but FISH was not successfully performed on cryopreserved blood samples. It is unclear from the results obtained whether cryopreservation actually induces genetic damage or if the observed damage was the result of the specific storage technique.

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  • The correspondence bias : a robust phenomenon? : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Russell, Gaye Eileen

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The primary aim of this study was to identify variables which may attenuate or eliminate the effect of the correspondence bias. A secondary aim was to identify aspects of the research paradigm which may encourage subjects to commit the bias. The quiz game paradigm developed by Ross, Amabile & Steinmetz (1977) was employed. The study examined the effect of origin of questions and number of questions correct on observers' ratings of a questioner and contestant's general knowledge ability. The subjects were 100 university students randomly assigned to one of four conditions. The combination of questions supplied and six questions correct condition eliminated the bias. Open ended questions were also employed to identify factors that encouraged subjects to commit the bias. The results of the study indicate that subjects utilised a number of normally appropriate strategies to judge general knowledge ability. Weaknesses of the study are outlined, as are implications of the study and recommendations for future research.

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  • Cyclone Bola : a study of the psychological after-effects : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Eustace, Kerry L

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The present study investigates the long-term post-trauma psychological reactions to Cyclone Bola, which struck the East Coast of the North Island of New Zealand in March, 1988. This study evaluates psychological morbidity in respondents, in particular it estimates prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study identifies factors which could influence the development of PTSD or other psychological problems which may result from a natural disaster. A questionnaire was posted to subjects identified as either having been evacuated from their homes during Cyclone Bola, or who applied for financial aid following the disaster. Four hundred and ninety three questionnaires were sent to the Gisborne area in July. 1993. One hundred and eighteen replies were suitable tor analysis. The study found that, at the time of measurement, 11.8% of respondents could be classified as PTSD cases and 17% scored in the high psychological distress group. Results did not support a direct link between the amount of adversity suffered and the psychological morbidity reported. However, there was an indirect link between the adversity suffered, the emotional distress reported by respondents at the time of the disaster and levels of psychological morbidity. Furthermore, there was support for the mediating influence of how satisfied respondents were with the help they received from relief agencies and with the social support they received at the time of the disaster. There was no support for gender differences in reactions to natural disasters. Some of these findings support previous research. Implications of these findings for future post-disaster psychological intervention are discussed.

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  • A cognitive behavioural intervention for problematic substance use in adolescence : a pilot study : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University

    Morrison, Cara

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Experimentation with substance use in adolescence is common, yet there is often concern when it appears to become more than experimentation. New Zealand youth, in particular, have some of the highest rates of substance abuse in the Western world. The main goal of this study was to determine if a brief manualised integration of cognitive behavioural therapy and motivational interviewing for adolescents was effective in reducing the harm caused by problematic substance use. The aim of the intervention was to reduce current and future difficulties with AOD use for adolescents. Four individual case studies and within subject comparisons were used to measure the effectiveness of this intervention in an educational setting. A battery of psychometric measures were used, including a structured diagnostic interview. Results indicated improvements in motivation and coping skills, and some short term reduction in substance use. Research issues are discussed, including the applicability of the DSM-IV criteria for substance use disorders in adolescence, and our understanding of 'risk'. The current study highlights the need for adolescent substance use interventions to be holistic and systemic in nature to successfully reduce substance related harm. The limitations of the current study are also discussed.

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  • Changes in B inhibitor and cytokinin levels in response to long wilting periods in grain sorghum at different growth stages : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Plant Science at Massey University

    Tay Kee Chong, George

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Irregular pagination.

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  • The demise of the New Zealand Social Work Training Council : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Social Work at Massey University

    Brook, Jane Elizabeth

    Thesis
    Massey University

    THE DEMISE OF THE NEW ZEALAND SOCIAL WORK TRAINING COUNCIL (N.Z.S.W.T.C.) This piece of research focuses upon the multiple reasons for the eventual review of the Social Work Training Council leading to its demise in 1985. Developmental theories of organisational change are used as a tool to analyse the Training Council in a macro-organisational context. Developmental theories suggest that unless certain goals are achieved then organisations will not proceed onto the next stage of development and growth. It is argued that the N.Z.S.W.T.C. never achieved the tastes of the third stage of development, the Stabilisation Stage and hence met its demise. This study also demonstrated that wider external conditions play a major role in the functioning of a body such as the Social Work Training Council. Implications for future such bodies are provided at the conclusion of this thesis.

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