10,498 results for Massey Research Online

  • Model based study of autothermal thermophilic aerobic digestion (ATAD) processes : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology in Engineering and Automation of Massey University

    Fryer, Barry

    Thesis
    Massey University

    An Autothermal Thermophilic Aerobic Digestion process, or ATAD process, is a relatively new sewage sludge treatment process. The ATAD process has been developed for the disinfection and stabilisation of sewage sludge, which is a by-product of wastewater treatment. The end product can be applied to the land as a soil additive or fertiliser with no restrictions, as the process dramatically reduces public health and environmental risks. The process is comparable to the composting process used for municipal solid waste and garden wastes. The process requires oxygen, usually in the form of air, to be applied to the sludge by an aeration system. The oxygen stimulates an exothermic biochemical reaction, which in turn heats the sludge up to thermophilic temperatures (between 50 and 65°C). At these temperatures the pathogenic bacteria, viruses and parasites in the sludge that are harmful to human health are effectively destroyed. The biochemical reaction also degrades a large portion of the organic sludge, which means that unstable, volatile odour generating substances are removed; this reduces the likelihood of smells and the attraction of flies and rodents (vector attraction) to the sludge.[FROM INTRODUCTION]

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  • Mothers' early feeding practices and the ecological factors that are associated with iron intake of 9-11 month old infants in Solana, Cagayan, Philippines : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Nutritional Science at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Lonzaga, Maria Gisela M

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Appendix A several missing pages from the original copy held in the library

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  • Predator-prey dynamics : a review : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Mathematics at Massey University

    Johnstone, David Gordon

    Thesis
    Massey University

    With the recent publication explosion in population ecology, there is an increasing need for a review of the diverse approaches towards modelling. This thesis is concerned with modelling of two-species predator-prey ecosystems using two-dimensional dynamic systems of first-order differential equations. Chapters one and two are introductory in nature, discussing the place of theoretical models in ecology, and the development of the classical Lotka-Volterra model and its subsequent fall from favour. Chapter three looks at general aspects of predator-prey modelling. Graphical and analytical approaches are outlined in detail, as is the more recent curvature approach. Further results are obtained when growth and predation factors are considered separately, viewed as components to the model equations. Recent work on the consequences of enrichment, harvesting, stocking and natural selection are also dealt with. In chapter four, more specific predator-prey models are presented. Other, more variable qualities of predator-prey ecosystems are also considered, such as age structure and predation responses in chapter four; and time delays, spatial heterogeneity and migration in chapter five. Chapter six is a mathematical digression from the main body of the review. An analytical result for dynamic systems with a centre is proven, in an attempt to support an alternative outlook on the relationship between predator-prey ecosystems and their representative models. Finally, chapter seven briefly discusses potential applications in the future, the most promising being aspects of harvesting and control theory in resource management systems.

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  • Production and efficiency : the case of the Australian Rugby League : a thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Applied Economics at Massey University

    Richardson, Sam

    Thesis
    Massey University

    What matters in the "production" of a game of rugby league? This analysis finds that several game-specific inputs (such as successful goal-kicking percentage, inherent team strength, and momentum of results) in the generation of a game outcome are statistically significantly different from zero at the 10% level or lower. This study also looks closely at measures of productive efficiency, including stochastic frontier modelling and data envelopment analysis (DEA). Panel data from the 1995, 1996 and 1998 National Rugby League (NRL) regular seasons are used to formulate average production functions and stochastic production frontier models and their respective measures of efficiency. It is found that many Sydney-based teams performed relatively more efficiently when compared to non-Sydney teams in 1998. There also appears to be evidence of a "weaker teams bringing the stronger teams down to their level" effect due to differences in point-scoring efficiency and game outcome efficiency in 1998.

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  • The protein requirement of juvenile silver trevally (Pseudocaranx georgianus) to optimise growth in hatchery environments : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Animal Science at Massey University, Manawatu, New Zealand. EMBARGOED until 31 December 2019

    Elvy, Jordan

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Aquaculture is a growing primary industry in New Zealand. Currently the industry is comprised of three main species: GreenshellTM mussels, Pacific oyster, and King Salmon. The introduction of a white fleshed fish presents obvious commercial opportunity and production gains for New Zealand aquaculture. Silver trevally provides this opportunity and has the potential to further develop the industry. When developing a new species for aquaculture an understanding of their nutritional requirements at the different life stages is required. This thesis investigates the protein requirement of juvenile silver trevally. Silver trevally (67.5±12.0g) were randomly assigned to 12 tanks, 15 fish per tank. Four isoenergetic diets ranging in crude protein (CP) content from 30 to 60% CP were fed, in triplicates, for 12 weeks. Growth, including specific growth rate (SGR), did not significantly differ between diets. Feed efficiency was lowest in fish fed the 40% CP diet compared with the other three diets. Protein retention was highest in fish fed the lowest protein diet. Condition indices in silver trevally were unaffected by the protein content of the diet. Overall, this experiment was inconclusive on the ideal protein level in the diet. A palatability trial was carried out to determine if feed intake varied among diets. For comparison a commercial pellet from Ridley’s (50% CP) and a gel diet (20.4% CP) used by Plant & Food Research was also included in this trial. Twenty-four fish from the growth trial were allocated to two tanks for the palatability trial. Four behavioural responses were observed: the food item was ignored; fish approached the food but did not ingest; the fish took the food into their mouths before spitting it out; and the food was ingested. The 60% CP experimental diet, a commercial pellet, and a gel diet had significantly higher rates of intake than the other diets, with the 30% CP diet having the lowest rate of complete ingestion. The 60% CP and gel diet had the lowest rate of food being ignored. The most palatable diets were the 60% CP diet and the gel diet.

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  • Pollination patterns in safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Agricultural Science in Plant Science at Massey University

    Woods, Peter William

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The influence of environmental conditions on safflower (Carthamus tinctorius L.) floret characters and insects were studied in relation to pollination in this species. Insect activity was studied in a field experiment using part of the world germplasm collection of safflower. Honey bees were the most likely cross-pollinators. Activity of honey bees did not vary between genotypes studied. Correlations between insect and weather data were mainly non-significant. A sample of 12 genotypes from the world collection were intensively studied in controlled environment rooms. Single plants were used as plots in a randomised complete block design, in each of four environments (day/night temperature treatments of 28/22°c and 24/l8°c in combination with vapour pressure deficit treatments of -1.0 and -0.4 kPa). Environments reflected New Zealand summer conditions. Coefficients of variation were acceptable for most characters. Considerable genotypic, environmental and genotype-environment interaction variances were observed for most characters. Standardised partial regression coefficients (path coefficients) and principal factors were utilized to determine the characters most important in self-pollination of safflower. These characters were: the length of the style-stigma; the rate of style-stigma growth; the rate of corolla tube growth and amounts of viable pollen present during floret expansion. Pollen viabilities remained high for the longest time in higher humidity environments. Large amounts of pollen were produced at the lower humidity. Floral parts were largest in the cool dry environment, however rates of style-stigma and corolla expansion were greater at lower temperatures. It was concluded that synchronization of the rates of style-stigma and corolla tube growth were important in maintaining the stigma in close proximity to viable pollen, and thus promoting the possibility of self-pollination. Self-pollination was greatest at the lower temperature and lower humidity. The basic self-pollination mechanism observed was in agreement with previous authors. A number of improvements for future controlled environment experiments involving safflower were suggested. The implications of pollination of safflower on germplasm collection and maintenance, artificial crossing and breeding plans were discussed.

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  • Model development and simulating of a spinning cone evaporator : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Technology at Institute of Technology and Engineering, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Zhu, Xizhong

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The idea of milk pre-concentration at the farm has attracted worldwide interest for many years. A new pilot-scale evaporator (called spinning cone evaporator), which can be operated on the farm and has a compact and efficient design, has been developed at Massey University. However, there is a shortage of knowledge on the design, operation and control of this new evaporator. The main goal of this thesis is to develop a dynamic mathematical model in order to better utilize this evaporator and make further developments. This thesis consists of three parts. Firstly, a first-principles model of a pilot scale spinning cone evaporator is developed using the sub-system modelling techniques of the evaporator from the Laws of Thermodynamics and the general mass and energy balances. The model is dynamic and includes the evaporator, the compressor, the condenser and the product transport sections. The system model describes the dynamic relationships between the input variables (cooling water flowrate, M c , speed of compressor, N comp , feed flowrate, M f , feed temperature, T f and mass composition of feed dry matter, W f ) and the output variables (outlet temperature of cooling water, T co , evaporating temperature, T e , mass composition of product dry matter, w p and product flowrate, M p ), Secondly, the evaporator model was implemented using the software package Matlab along with its dynamic simulation environment Simulink. The differential equations for the evaporator model are embedded in a block diagram representation of the evaporator system. The evaporator Simulink model is divided into three levels, the blocks at the top represent the overall model and global constants used in it. The second level contains the individual sub-systems and the bottom level elements within each sub-system. Results of the model verification are satisfactory. Finally, the model validation is presented for both steady state and dynamic comparisons. The product flowrate (except in the case of feed temperature changes) and evaporation temperature can be predicted at a given time, and the outlet temperature of cooling water and product dry matter composition can also be predicted at a steady state. It can be seen that the results predicted using this spinning cone evaporator model, which accounts for the varying concentrate flowrate and evaporation temperature with time, are in good agreement with experimental data. This model provides a valuable tool to predict performance in a spinning cone evaporator and to modify the design parameters.

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  • Problems involved in the conservation of historic buildings in New Zealand: a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy at Massey University

    Lewis, Joanne

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This empirical research derives, by way of case studies, the range of problems involved in the conservation of historic buildings in New Zealand. A dichotomy of problems is evident and consequently discussed - legislative/regulatory problems, and problems pertaining to held attitudes. The first category looks at the problems of inadequate legislative provisions for historic building protection (in both the Historic Places Act 1980, and the Town and Country Planning Act 1977), the earthquake standards and design codes, and 'legislative omissions' (a phrase coined to cover aspects neglected in the current legislation). In the second category, conservation problems attributed to the attitudes of government, the public, local authorities, owners/developers, and the Historic Places Trust are discussed as they present a hindrance to the effective protection of historic buildings in New Zealand. Finally recommendations are tendered which, if actioned, would go a long way towards counteracting these problems, and consequently render historic buildings in New Zealand more likely to be conserved.

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  • Developing non-destructive techniques to predict 'Hayward' kiwifruit storability : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Food Technology at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand. EMBARGOED until 1 December 2019

    Li, Mo

    Thesis
    Massey University

    A significant portion of New Zealand’s kiwifruit production is held as stock in local coolstores for extended periods of time before being exported. Many pre-harvest factors contribute to variation in fruit quality at harvest and during coolstorage, and results in the difficulty in segregating fruit for their storage outcomes. The objective of this work was to develop non-destructive techniques utilised at harvest to predict storability of individual or batches of ‘Hayward’ kiwifruit based on (near) skin properties. Segregation of fruit with low storage potential at harvest could enable that fruit to be sold earlier in the season reducing total fruit loss and improving profitability later in the season. The potential for optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect near surface cellular structural differences in kiwifruit as a result of preharvest factors was demonstrated through quantitative image analysis of 3D OCT images of intact fruit from five commercial cultivars. Visualisation and characterisation of large parenchyma cells in the outer pericarp of kiwifruit was achieved by developing an automated image processing technique. This work established the usefulness of OCT to perform rapid analysis and differentiation of the microstructures of sub-surface cells between kiwifruit cultivars. However, the effects of preharvest conditions between batches of fruit within a cultivar were not detectable from image analysis and hence, the ability to provide segregation or prediction for fruit from the same cultivar was assumed to be limited. Total soluble solids concentration (TSS) and flesh firmness (FF) are two important quality attributes indicating the eating quality and storability of stored kiwifruit. Prediction of TSS and FF using non-destructive techniques would allow strategic marketing of fruit. This work demonstrated that visible-near-infrared (Vis-NIR) spectroscopy could be utilised as the sole input at harvest, to provide quantitative prediction of post-storage TSS by generating blackbox regression models. However the level of accuracy achieved was not adequate for online sorting purposes. Quantitative prediction of FF remained unsuccessful. Improved ways of physical measurements for FF may help reduce the undesirable variation observed on the same fruit and increase prediction capability. More promising results were obtained by developing blackbox classification models using Vis-NIR spectroscopy at harvest to segregate storability of individual kiwifruit based on the export FF criterion of 1 kgf (9.8 N). Through appropriate machine learning techniques, the surface properties of fruit at harvest captured in the form of spectral data were correlated to post-storage FF via pattern recognition. The best prediction was obtained for fruit stored at 0°C for 125 days: approximately 50% of the soft fruit and 80% of the good fruit could be identified. The developed model was capable of performing classification both within (at the fruit level) and between grower lines. Model validation suggested that segregation between grower lines at harvest achieved 30% reduction in soft fruit after storage. Should the model be applied in the industry to enable sequential marketing, $11.2 million NZD/annum could be saved because of reduced fruit loss, repacking and condition checking costs.

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  • Medical geography and its contribution to the aetiology of rare systemic connective tissue diseases : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Geography at Massey University

    Borman, Graham Barry

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis is in two interrelated parts. Part One traced the historical development of medical geography since the idea of applying a geographical perspective to medical problems was first mooted in 4 B.C. The main trends in the evolving philosophy and methodology of this field were noted, and a distinction was made between the Western and Soviet interpretations of the nature and scope of medical geography. The methods available to medical geographers for cartographically portraying medical data were discussed. Part Two represented the application cf geographical principles to the study of rare systemic connective tissue diseases. The inherent problems of collection. and of verification of the medical data used in this study were detailed. Using cartographic and statistical techniques the diseases under study were spatially and temporally defined. It was found that scleroderma had a statistically significantly high incidence in the Taieri Geographic County, and it was this disease and this area which wore the principal contributory factors to the statistically significantly high incidence of all connective tissue diseases at the larger scales of areal units in the Otago region. The structures of the populations affected by these diseases were also studied, with the findings generally confirming the results obtained in overseas surveys. No association was found between the incidence of systemic lupus erythematosus, and high sunshine hours, while the disease subsets did not exhibit a rural or urban bias in their incidence. Paucity of cases precluded a study of the possible racial predilection of the diseases or any association of incidence with a patient's occupation. Suggested avenues for possible aetiological research accruing from this analysis were detailed.

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  • "It's a whole package" : Type 2 diabetes and what it means for the body, life and self of people of Indian origin in New Zealand : a thesis presented in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology (with an endorsement in Health Psychology) at Massey University, Albany, New Zealand

    Tresslor, Shireen Kim

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Type 2 diabetes represents a considerable health problem for the Indian population group in New Zealand. In order to minimise the risk posed by this disease, recommended therapeutic goals include glycaemic control, maintaining a healthy weight and strict control of blood pressure. Culturally derived understandings of the illness and options for management will affect the way in which the person of Indian origin reacts to diabetes. This study looked at the way in which Type 2 diabetes is constructed and positioned while reflecting on how Indian culture might affect the way in which diabetes is interpreted and experienced. Seven males and five females, identifying themselves as being of Indian origin and managing Type 2 diabetes without the use of insulin were selected for the study. Semi-structured interviews were taped, transcribed and analysed using a reflexive approach to Foulcauldian discourse analysis Understanding diabetes begins through describing and accounting for the diabetic body which is believed to be different to other bodies. The way in which the person with diabetes might chose to control the disease and minimise harm to the body is validated by particular beliefs in cause and nature. As a result, the person with diabetes is able to construct a constantly evolving picture of the way in which the disease develops, what can be expected of it and what diabetes means for them, for their families and social connections. All this takes place within the particular social and cultural perceptual system of the person of Indian origin and the environment within which they live their every-day lives. The person with diabetes is actively engaged in processing new information, weighing options and defining who they are, not merely as someone with diabetes but as multi-dimensional individuals. Drawing on different constructions of the self, to justify and explain actions taken, opens up or limits access to opportunities to make changes and embrace new behaviors to manage their diabetes.

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  • A pollen identification expert system ; an application of expert system techniques to biological identification : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Computer Science Massey University

    Eagle, Colin G

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The application of expert systems techniques to biological identification has been investigated and a system developed which assists a user to identify and count air-borne pollen grains. The present system uses a modified taxonomic data matrix as the structure for the knowledge base. This allows domain experts to easily assess and modify the knowledge using a familiar data structure. The data structure can be easily converted to rules or a simple frame-based structure if required for other applications. A method of ranking the importance of characters for identifying each taxon has been developed which assists the system to quickly narrow an identification by rejecting or accepting candidate taxa. This method is very similar to that used by domain experts.

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  • The middle Pleistocene extinction of bathyal benthic foraminifera in the South Atlantic (ODP sites 1082 and 1088) : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Earth Science at Massey University

    O'Neill, Tanya Ann

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The youngest major turnover in deep-sea benthic foraminifera (termed the Stilostomella extinction) is documented in two ODP sites in the South Atlantic Ocean. This study is the first detailed investigation of its kind in this region, and reveals the pulsed decline and eventual extinction of 33 species of elongate, cylindrical benthic foraminifera belonging to the families Stilostomellidae, Pleurostomellidae, and part of the Nodosariidae during the mid-Pleistocene climatic transition (MPT, ~1200 - 600ka). Furthermore, the Stilostomella extinction is limited to elongate species with highly specific apertural characteristics (e.g. cribrate, slit lunate, and hooded with secondary teeth), such as Chrysalogonium, Ellipsoglandulina, and Pleurostomella species, respectively. Micropaleontological and sedimentological data from lower bathyal Sites 1082 and 1088 (1290 m and 2082 m water depth, respectively) provide a proxy record of oceanographic changes in the South Atlantic Ocean through the MPT. This study compares the timing and causes of the Stilostomella extinction between two highly contrasting environmental settings in relation to paleoceanographic history, sediment regime and paleoproductivity. In the South Atlantic, the abundance and accumulation rate of Extinction Group (EG) taxa began to decline between ~ 1070 and 1000 ka at both core sites. The rate of decline was pulsed, with major declines usually associated with cool periods, and partial recoveries during intervening warm periods. The timing of highest occurrences (HOs) was diachronous between sites, and the final Stilostomella extinction datum is marked by the uppermost occurrence of Myllostomella matanzana and Siphonodosaria sagrinensis at ~705 ka in Site 1082, and Myllostomella matanzana and Pleurostomella alternans at ~600 ka in Site 1088. This corresponds with the previously documented global Stilostomella extinction datum within the period of 700 and 570 ka. Detailed comparisons with North Atlantic and Southwest Pacific studies confirm the highly diachronous nature of HOs of EG species, and furthermore, reveal that there is a lead time of ~100 kyr between HOs of the same species in the North Atlantic, compared with the South Atlantic. This study suggests that declines and extinctions at Site 1082 were primarily driven by highly fluctuating food supply associated with increased productivity caused by intensified upwelling during MPT glacial periods. In contrast, extinctions at Site 1088 appear to have been a result of the MPT reorganisation of the global deep-water 'conveyor belt', with δ 13 C gradients revealing that high dissolved oxygen Glacial North Atlantic Intermediate Water (GNAIW) bathed the region during cool periods. Far from a simple response to change in a single parameter, numerous factors have interacted and appear to have caused the demise of the Stilostomella extinction taxa. These factors include encroachment by well-ventilated (high dissolved oxygen) GNAIW, fluctuations in food supply, and possibly winnowing (of the phytodetritus layer) by vigorous bottom currents during MPT glacial periods.

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  • Modelling of the drying section of a continuous paper machine : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirement for the degree of Master in Production Technology at Massey University

    Ma, Huiting

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The invention of paper in 105 A.D. was a milestone in the history of civilization and demand for paper has been increasing steadily ever since. Although it has become more and more popular to store, process and transfer information in electronic forms, paper is to date still the most common means for recording information. According to Storat (1993), production in the last twenty years has increased by more than 60 percent, while capital expenditures in the industry have grown to almost 12 percent of sales, or double the average expenditures of other manufacturing industries. This capital investment has gone towards capacity expansion and extensive rebuilds of existing mills - almost 60 percent of the existing capacity comes from modern facilities containing machines either newly installed or rebuilt in the past ten years. As a result, fossil fuel and energy consumption in this industry fell by 46 percent in the last two decades.[FROM INTRODUCTION]

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  • Polymer dynamics studied by dynamic light scattering : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Physics at Massey University

    Clark, David Thomas

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Appendix 1 and 2 – articles have been removed due to copyright. The articles are available in the print copy held in the library.

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  • Men's stories : an analysis of men's talk of separation : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy in Psychology, Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand, 2006

    Kendall, Ross D

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This study, examining men's talk about separating from relationships, uses a hybrid model of discourse and structural analysis. The research identifies four dominant discourses: a legal system discourse, a discourse of morality, a discourse of masculinity and a discourse of journeying. The men construct their experiences as negative occurrences: destructive and painful; but also as positive events: necessary, timely and ultimately beneficial. Their use of the discourses serves two opposing purposes: to position them as relatively innocent and vulnerable in the breakdown of their relationships, and as resolute, determined and in control of their lives. The dialectical clash of these themes leads in most cases to a position where the men can act as moral agents with clear aims and goals.

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  • Measurement of bone quality in growing male rats using dual energy x-ray absorptiometry and bone ash content : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Science in Animal Science at Massey University, Palmerston North, New Zealand

    Brown, Katherine Elizabeth

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Growing male rats have been considered and used as a model for bone growth and prevention of osteoporosis because of their high bone turnover and demand for calcium. Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA) is a useful tool for identifying minimal changes in bone mineral density and has recently been adapted for use in small animal models. The objective of this trial was to identify the changes in Bone Mineral Density (BMD) in relation to age and to identify how BMD varies from site to site. Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats were split into six groups to allow measurements at one, two, three, four, five and six months of age (n=10 per group). At each time point a group of rats was scanned using a QDR4000 DEXA machine from Hologic. Duplicate BMD measurements were obtained for the whole body, spine and both femurs in vivo. The rats were then euthanased and the spine and both femurs were excised for ex vivo DEXA scanning and ashed calcium analysis. BMD increased almost linearly to four months and then formed a plateau. This indicates that from weaning to four months is an especially sensitive time for manipulating bone growth in male rats. There was a significant difference in BMD between groups (P<0.001), believed to be due to variation at two and five months of age. There was a very strong positive correlation between weight and BMD and age and BMD at all sites, indicating that BMD is a strongly related to both weight and age. All sites were strongly correlated to each other and to the ashed calcium values. The excised femur had a lower BMD value than the in vivo femur, although the two values were strongly correlated. This is believed to be due to differences in positioning and indicates that the two methods cannot be used interchangeably. These results indicate that bone mineral density is the gold standard for following changes in bone growth over time in the growing rat. Alternatively, ashed bone calcium content can be used, but only as a once off endpoint.

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  • An observational study of film making as a classroom activity : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of M.A. in Education at Massey University

    Clayton, Gray

    Thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years, schools and educationalists have shown an increasing awareness of the function of educational media in the classroom. While much educational media is concerned with presenting or displaying information as an aid to learning, there has also been an increasing awareness that film (or television) production can play a useful part in a school curriculum. (See, for example, Screen Education (1963). A wealth of instructional texts on film use abounds, but almost all of it is concerned with prescribing appropriate methods for 'handling the hardware' in order to utilise a group of novices in producing a film. (Lownds, 1968; Roberts & Sharples, 1971 etc).[FROM INTRODUCTION]

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  • The problem of misrepresentation meets connectionist representations : a thesis submitted for the degree of Master of Philosophy

    Cash, Mason

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Page 162 is missing from the original copy

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  • The population dynamics of bovine tuberculosis in possums : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Mathematics at Massey University

    Sleeman, Maree

    Thesis
    Massey University

    With the recent outcry concerning the spread of Bovine Tuberculosis throughout the New Zealand Possum population, there is an increasing need to study some of the diverse modelling approaches to this problem. This thesis centres on modelling the epidemics of this disease using two and three-dimensional dynamical systems, which describe the change in the possum population and change in the number of individuals that are diseased. Introductory material is covered in Chapter One, which reports on the first, through to some of the most recent research completed in the area of disease epidemics. A review of the previous model of possum tuberculosis is also introduced. Chapter Two looks at the effects on the dynamics of the model of changing the recovery curve parameter, which measures the degree of recovery of possums following a control operation. Detailed steady-state analysis is carried out on the system and local stability determined. In Chapter Three, a three-dimensional model is investigated that allows for a latent period following infection of disease. Instead of a possum being able to spread the disease immediately after becoming infected itself, there is a latent time until the disease becomes contagious. An in-depth description is given as to how this model originates, then steady-state analysis is explored, and finally local stability of the steady-states is examined. Restricting the contact rate of an individual possum with the rest of the population is the model studied in Chapter Four. Rather than a possum being able to come in contact with the whole population in a set time, as was the situation in the previous models, the number of contacts is fixed at some realistic value for the given time period. Steady-state analysis is carried out for this new model, along with the local stability analysis. Chapter Five looks at the various models and how they relate to the model in Chapter Two. as this model is the base for the subsequent ones. Computer generated plots are examined in order to display the numerical differences between the models. A brief comparison is given between these and some other models in the literature, and concludes by discussing some of the advantages and disadvantages of the various models. Finally, Chapter Six discusses the need for implementing spatially distributed models in the future, to allow for patchiness within the population.

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