10,433 results for ResearchCommons@Waikato

  • Issues and Challenges around the fostering of a productive respectful community ethos within an integrated/inclusive class context

    Cheesman, Sue (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In teaching and facilitating dance in integrated community contexts, building a community among participants seems critically important. In this context, how are the differing needs of a class managed in order to foster a respectful productive learning environment? How is a sense of agency cultivated? What pedagogical issues arise in such a context? In this article, I attempt to interrogate these questions, recognising strategies, identifying and unpacking some of the negotiations, issues and challenges. My approach draws on the work of Chappell (2011), Kuppers (2007, 2014), Shapiro (1998) and Zitomer (2013). Theorising my personal practice from a dance teacher’s ‘self-narrative’ point of view, interwoven with other viewpoints from dance and educational research, it can be argued that much is to be gained from reflection that empowers teachers and learners in integrated community contexts.

    View record details
  • Scaling the mountain to principalship Barriers and enablers in a female first time principal’s journey to leadership

    Mortimer, Samantha; Edwards, Frances (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    The purpose of this presentation is to describe the journey of Janet who was appointed as a first time principal in her 50s. The study is relevant to the field of educational leadership as although girls outpace boys at schools and universities and are currently entering the work force at higher salaries than ever before, there have been minimal changes in the proportion of females in top executive positions in the last decade. For example, in 2012, around 60% of the total number of high school teachers in New Zealand were women but they held less than 33% of all principal positions. This being the case it is useful to reflect on the stories of women who have achieved school principal positions, in order to discover what helped and hindered them on their journey. In 2015, Janet shared her story about her journey to principalship using a guided interview framework characterised by the creation of themes with open ended questions. Her unique lived experience and the significance of her everyday life to becoming a first time principal was documented and explored by drawing out patterns through coding the transcript and identifying themes through a process of careful reading and reviewing. Janet described her journey, identifying the enablers and barriers along the way and the identity work that enabled her to gain her first position as a school principal. Janet acknowledged the impact of gender, being a wife, and being a mother to a school aged child, and the gender-specific expectations others have of principals, as barriers. She also identified enablers, the people and the processes that helped her to succeed in her career including, her strong belief in social justice which arose from her parents, her support systems including the mentors who guided her throughout her career path to the present day, and the professional development opportunities she was able to enjoy. She talked about a gestalt shift her identity and its collision with circumstances which gave her the confidence to apply for her current job as a school principal. Janet showed she was capable of making workable, manageable and balanced judgments in relation to her work and life including finding people and activities that could support her. Building on the work of Mamood (2015) a visual metaphor that encapsulates Janet’s journey is proposed. This provides a rich view of a woman’s road to principalship and demonstrates the complexity of Janet’s educational leadership journey.

    View record details
  • A future-focus for teaching and learning: Technology education in two New Zealand secondary schools

    Reinsfield, Elizabeth (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Technology education has been a part of the New Zealand curriculum in many forms since its inception as a craft subject. With a global push towards technological innovation and an increased awareness of the impact of technology on society, it is reasonable to assume that technology education has an established role in student learning around the local and international social issues that intersect with technology. This article is based on the initial findings of doctoral research, which aims to illustrate how teacher’s perceptions and previous experiences influence their understandings around the nature of technology education in their school.

    View record details
  • Effect of microwave pre-treatment on air-drying orange (Beauregard) kumara slices

    Deng, Lingze; Carson, James K.; Swan, Janis E. (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The effects of slice thickness, microwave pre-treatment, and drying temperature on drying orange kumara slices were investigated. The highest drying rate, with minimal loss of colour, occurred at 80°C. Slice thickness did not significantly influence colour but drying time increased with slice thickness. The drying curves fitted the Page thin-layer drying model. Two minutes microwave pre-treatment significantly reduced overall drying time and improved colour but increased shrinkage.

    View record details
  • A cultural-sensitive approach to counseling a Samoan sex offender

    Seiuli, Byron Malaela Sotiata (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Sexual violation is any form of sexual violence, including rape, child molestation, incest, and similar forms of non-consensual sexual contact. Much of these acts of violation are perpetuated, but not entirely, by men against women and children. Moetolo is a Samoan term that is used to describe a person who sexually violates another while they or their family are asleep. This paper presents and discusses sexual abuse from a Samoan viewpoint. Insights are drawn from the authors' counseling engagement with a Samoan sex offender as part of his probation review process. Relevant literature is also engaged to inform and provide interpretation to the therapeutic work carried out. This article seeks to contribute new understanding to patterned responses of some Samoan people to sexual abuse behaviors, and steps to remedy arising concerns with perpetrators seeking reintegration back into their communities.

    View record details
  • Using vignettes in interviews: Exploring discourses around child sexuality

    Flanagan, Paul (2017)

    Report
    University of Waikato

    In this case study, I describe the process of data gathering using vignettes in both interview and focus group contexts. Vignettes offer multiple possibilities when researching sensitive topics in which participants may experience vulnerability. This research examines understandings of sexuality in childhood. As a child and family counselor working closely with principals and teachers in primary schools, I supported schools and families responding to children’s “sexual" activity. Parents and teachers questioned the causes and effects of these children’s actions. Many adults responded from fear, naivety, confusion, and assumptions about children’s actions. These adult reactions led toward over-reactive and punitive consequences for children. Informed by adults’ discomfort and subsequent inscriptions of children’s actions as sexual, I developed six vignettes to elicit participant knowledge. I worked alongside ...

    View record details
  • Changing the (video) game: Innovation, user satisfaction and copyrights in network market competition

    Goltz, Nachshon (Sean); Franks, Jaimie; Goltz, Shem (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper explores the emerging trend of user-generated content and innovation in the development of new products and ideas, breaking the traditional producer-consumer paradigm that once dominated the marketplace. In particular, the paper evaluates and compares the relationship between innovation and user satisfaction within the video game industry. To do so, the paper assesses data collected from the online communities of two very different games, Minecraft and Call of Duty in order to determine if there is a link between user-innovation and user-satisfaction in a product. The authors predict that more innovation in a game leads to more user satisfaction. The results of the research do not support this prediction. As observed in the online communities of the two games, there is no clear connection between high levels of innovation with higher user satisfaction. In fact, there is no direct connection between innovation and user satisfaction. However, Minecraft was found to be the more innovative game of the two and did have an overall higher level of user satisfaction than compared to Call of Duty. The data also suggests that Minecraft players experience a greater fluctuation in their enjoyment of the game compared to the players of the game with less innovation, Call of Duty. Finally, “radical innovation” was only found in Minecraft and not in the game with less player-control. This paper then goes on to discuss the role of innovation and user-generated digital content within the realm of intellectual property law and the resulting copyright implications for video game producers and players alike.

    View record details
  • Researching perceptions of childhood sexuality: Using vignettes in interviews with teachers, counsellors, parents and young children

    Flanagan, Paul (2014)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Adults interpret children’s actions from their own positionings within culture and gender discourses. Children’s ‘sexual’ actions or ‘sexualised behaviour’ is responded to from ideas of innocence and indifference to moral panics and protective interventions. Adults express discomfort and uncertainty about how to understand and respond to young children acting this way. Researching sexuality traverses social and cultural environments in which people live. Frayser (2003) refers to ‘shifting cultural maps’ as constructions of sexuality move from reproductive to relational and recreational understandings. “An expanded view of sexuality has meant an expanded interpretation of what is sexual; Words, looks, touches, pictures, and movements can all be construed in sexual ways” (Frayser, 2003, p. 267). Mitchell (2005), researching children’s sexuality in the Australian context, noted limitations in the literature, including the conceptualisation of sexuality; the difficulty of defining ‘normal’ sexual development when children’s sexuality is not considered in a wider, social and cultural context; and the dearth of research about children’s understandings of sexuality. This paper describes a New Zealand doctoral study exploring discourses shaping constructions of sexuality in childhood. In particular, the paper focuses on the methodological approach of using vignettes. Primary school teachers, parents, counsellors and children responded to a series of vignettes within focus groups and semi-structured interviews. The use of vignettes produced a context of safe participation for participants. This method supported participants’ confidence and trust with both the research process and their relationship with the researcher. As understandings were shared, enquiry brought forward further ideas and experiences from participants. Many readily disclosed more personal information, telling stories of child sexual activity: about themselves; their own children; family members; or stories of other children known to them. A social constructionist framework underpins this research: children’s experiences are multi-storied and multiple meanings are available in understandings of sexuality. Foucault’s concepts of the genealogical method are used in the analysis of the literature, policies and practices on childhood sexuality, together with discursive positioning from the participants’ narratives. Vignettes gave a safe entry into discussions about childhood sexuality, beginning with less problematic stories and then further examples of developing complexity. They provided stories to be viewed at a distance, then allowing for closer and more personal sharing of experiences. Awareness and understanding multiple social and cultural discourses shaping constructions of childhood sexuality is useful for teachers, parents and counsellors.

    View record details
  • Motivation and the reciprocal nature of professional learning between New Zealand teachers working with untrained Indian teachers

    Daly, Nicola; Sharma, Sashi (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this article eight volunteer participants in a programme for untrained teachers in India are interviewed concerning their motivation to participate in the work, and also the challenges faced and the rewards gained. Findings show similar factors are at play in the motivation for the participants, but new knowledge concerning motivation to return to the same work is revealed. With regard to challenges faced, the language barrier, finances and arranging time off work were evident, and, in addition, family considerations were mentioned, an area not identified in previous work. The rewards of the volunteer work linked mainly to relationships, but the notions of intercultural awareness and of ako were also revealed. Participants went to India to share their teaching experience, but came home with new awareness of their own teaching practice in New Zealand.

    View record details
  • Assessment of Self-Management Skills in a Project-Based Learning Paper

    Scott, Jonathan B.; Khoo, Elaine G.L.; Seshadri, Sinduja; Cree, Michael J. (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This initial study revealed the potential of having management-specific assessment and business-related demonstrating staff in undergraduate engineering project- based classes. This will offer students valuable insights in preparing for engineering industries that are increasingly incorporating interdisciplinary expertise and ideas to solve complex issues.

    View record details
  • Joint parental school choice: Exploring the influence of individual preferences of husbands and wives

    Mariel, Petr; Scarpa, Riccardo; Vega-Bayo, Ainhoa (2018)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The objective of this paper is to study school choice as a deliberate joint parental decision. This decision is affected by the underlying preferences of the husband and wife. We use survey data from a sample of parents in the metropolitan area of Bilbao (Spain) to estimate a bargaining discrete choice model. The collected data set contains hypothetical school choices gathered in the form of a typical discrete choice experiment (stated preferences) and the actual school choice (revealed preferences). Stated preference data are obtained separately for husbands and wives, but the revealed preference choice is taken jointly. Our findings show, firstly, that the husband's and wife's stated preferences regarding school choice do not differ markedly. Secondly, the results obtained for the revealed preferences deviate from the stated preferences for some school characteristics. Finally, we find that neither the husband's nor the wife's preferences prevail in the actual joint school choice decision.

    View record details
  • “We wanted to see if you were the real deal”: Teaching as a cultural practice in a challenging environment

    Lemon, Katrina Suezanne; Edwards, Frances (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Teaching can be viewed as a cultural practice in which teaching is embedded in the culture of the teacher and informed by the culture of the students (Bell, 2011). In this paper, a narrative is presented detailing an authentic example of teaching in New Zealand in which culture is prioritised. It describes the challenges faced by a young female teacher as she worked in a low decile secondary school with male students, the majority of whom were involved in the Mongrel Mob[1] gang. Her approach and responses were centred in her belief in culturally responsive teaching. The deliberate actions of the teacher led to a turning point for the students, allowing their mana to remain intact as she acknowledged their identity, language and culture. This teacher’s experience provides an example of how a teacher can enable learners in diverse classrooms to succeed in their learning.

    View record details
  • Above the treeline: a nature guide to alpine New Zealand [Book review]

    Gemmill, Chrissen E.C. (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This article reviews the book "Above the treeline: a nature guide to alpine New Zealand", by Sir Alan F. Mark (with contributors).

    View record details
  • Measuring critical thinking about deeply held beliefs: Can the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory help?

    Goldberg, Ilan Yaakov; Kingsbury, Justine; Bowell, Tracy; Howard, Darelle Jane (2015)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    The California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI) is a commonly used tool for measuring critical thinking dispositions. However, research on the efficacy of the CCTDI in predicting good thinking about students’ own deeply held beliefs is scant. In this paper we report on our study that was designed to gauge the usefulness of the CCTDI in this context, and take some first steps towards designing a better method for measuring strong sense critical thinking.

    View record details
  • Wireless Energy Harvesting by Direct Voltage Multiplication on Lateral Waves from a Suspended Dielectric layer

    Liu, Louis W.Y.; Zhang, Qingfeng; Chen, Yifan; Teeti, Mohammed A.; Das, Ranjan (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    This paper explores the feasibility of wireless energy harvesting by direct voltage multiplication on lateral waves. Whilst free space is undoubtedly a known medium for wireless energy harvesting, space waves are too attenuated to support realistic transmission of wireless energy. A layer of thin stratified dielectric material suspended in mid-air can form a substantially less attenuated pathway, which efficiently supports propagation of wireless energy in the form of lateral waves. The conductivity of the suspended dielectric layer does not appear to be a critical factor rendering propagation of lateral waves impossible. In this paper, a mathematical model has been developed to simulate wireless energy harvesting over a suspended layer of stratified dielectric material. The model has been experimentally verified with the help of a novel open-ended voltage multiplier designed to harvest energy from ambient electromagnetic fields.

    View record details
  • Extremely fast decision tree mining for evolving data streams

    Bifet, Albert; Zhang, Jiajin; Fan, Wei; He, Cheng; Zhang, Jianfeng; Qian, Jianfeng; Holmes, Geoffrey; Pfahringer, Bernhard (2017)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    Nowadays real-time industrial applications are generating a huge amount of data continuously every day. To process these large data streams, we need fast and efficient methodologies and systems. A useful feature desired for data scientists and analysts is to have easy to visualize and understand machine learning models. Decision trees are preferred in many real-time applications for this reason, and also, because combined in an ensemble, they are one of the most powerful methods in machine learning. In this paper, we present a new system called STREAMDM-C++, that implements decision trees for data streams in C++, and that has been used extensively at Huawei. Streaming decision trees adapt to changes on streams, a huge advantage since standard decision trees are built using a snapshot of data, and can not evolve over time. STREAMDM-C++ is easy to extend, and contains more powerful ensemble methods, and a more efficient and easy to use adaptive decision trees. We compare our new implementation with VFML, the current state of the art implementation in C, and show how our new system outperforms VFML in speed using less resources.

    View record details
  • Can Justice be Traded for Democracy?

    Foxcroft, Debrin (2017)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Waikato

    For much of the Twentieth Century, the transition processes of democratizing states have followed a familiar pattern. Outgoing authoritarian regimes relinquished power after extracting the promise of amnesty from the incoming democratic leadership. These authoritarian leaders demanded amnesty for gross human rights violations. The incoming democratic leaders felt like they had no choice. Amnesty has consistently been viewed as a necessary price to pay for democracy. While expedient, in agreeing to amnesty the incoming democratic leaders agreed to sacrifice justice for democracy. This thesis examines the long-term consequences of the amnesty pact on the democratic state and questions whether justice can be sacrificed without ultimately undermining the basis of the democracy. While other studies have focused on the moral implications of amnesty, this work examines the functional realities. Rather than asking whether democratic elites should agree to amnesty, this work asks whether they actually can. Can measures of justice be sacrificed without fundamentally undermining the development and stability of democracy? Can the argument that amnesty is in the interest of the greater good subdue later demands for restoration or retribution? Case study methodology is employed in the examination of the political transitions of Brazil, Chile and South Africa. These countries have each employed different approach to amnesty, though all coming to the same general end. The political and social outcomes in each country speak to the fundamental consequences of amnesty legislation decades after the bargain was struck. The case studies inform my response to the larger theoretical question. This research posits the argument that there are fundamental incompatibilities between the injustice of amnesty and the fundamental requirement of justice that is characteristic of democracy; the current collapse of democracies in Brazil and South Africa, and the fundamental struggles in Chile, are, it is argued, the inevitable results of this impossible trade-off. Building on the data gained from in-country qualitative research, this thesis argues that democratic norms will either be fundamentally weakened by the continued existence and use of amnesty, or, alternatively, democratic norms will be forced to undermine the law or decree itself, compelling leaders to eventually repeal such legislation that ultimately makes democracy, in its basic foundation in justice, impossible. Either situation is highly problematic, creating the potential for instability and the possibility of regime reversal. At its core, this research suggests that the long-term negative consequences of amnesty outweigh the immediate gains made during the transition. For democracy to work, it must be built on a foundation of justice. Amnesty legislation undermines that foundation, and this is simply more than a newly democratizing state can sustain.

    View record details
  • A Critical Analysis of a Culturally Responsive Pedagogy Towards Improving Māori Achievement

    Richards, Stephanie Moana (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    The research task presented in this thesis examines how one English medium school, provides a culturally responsive practice that ensures the improved educational achievement of Māori students. The thesis begins by looking at some of the discourses that have transpired concerning Māori and the disparity in education that has affected Māori students’ educational outcomes. It investigates kaupapa Māori approaches and interventions that came about to combat Māori education disparity and gave Māori autonomy over their own outlooks. It also focuses on Te Kotahitanga and culturally responsive pedagogy as a response in raising Māori educational achievement. This study was conducted in a kaupapa Māori and culturally responsive manner with a mixed method approach that included the triangulation of qualitative and quantitative data. Qualitative data included student, their parents and teacher voice as semi-structured interviews and quantitative data comprised of student achievement data and Te Kotahitanga teacher observation data. The discoveries are discussed as to the influence of the culturally responsive discourses that affected Māori student achievement. This study suggests that when teachers implement culturally responsive practices in their classrooms, students improve educationally. Therefore, to combat the disparity that Māori students in English medium schools experience a change in school and teacher practice needs to occur so that it reflects a culturally responsive pedagogy of relations.

    View record details
  • Treating Water Using a Perforated Electrode Flow Through Cell

    Hettiarachchi, Jayani (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Perforated Electrode Flow Through cell (PEFT cell) is an undivided electro –chlorination cell designed by the University of Waikato. A new design was developed that consists of two sets of perforated electrodes assembled in a 3D printed casing. The aim of this research was to test the new PEFT cell for chlorine production, trial it for E-coli disinfection and iron and manganese removal by coupling it to a DMI-65 column. Maximum chlorine concentration was achieved at 0.1 mol/L NaCl concentration at a flow rate of 1.8 ml/s at 5 volts and 10 amps, and a current density of 44 mA/cm2, resulting in a chlorine concentration of 510 mg/L. Chlorine production increased with increasing salt concentration but decreased with flow rate. Maximum chlorine production rate was at 0.14 mg/s.amp at 7.41 ml/s flow rate. Total inactivation of E-coli bacteria was achieved for all conditions tested. Iron and manganese removals of 92.5% and 90% respectively were achieved for synthetic bore water when the PEFT cell was coupled to a DMI-65 column.

    View record details
  • Stiff fluid spike solutions from Bianchi type V seed solutions

    Gregoris, D.; Lim, Woei Chet; Coley, A.A. (2017-12-07)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    In this paper we expand upon our previous work Coley et al (2016 Class. Quantum Grav. 33 215010) by using the entire family of Bianchi type V stiff fluid solutions as seed solutions of the Stephani transformation. Among the new exact solutions generated, we observe a number of important physical phenomena. The most interesting phenomenon is exact solutions with intersecting spikes. Other interesting phenomena are solutions with saddle states and a close-to-FL epoch.

    View record details