27,260 results for ResearchSpace@Auckland

  • Finding the balance: teachers as recontextualising agents in the struggle between classical and popular music in the secondary school curriculum.

    McPhail, Graham (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Many commentators have argued that Western music education is in a state of crisis. Within the field, traditional views centred on classical traditions and cultural reproduction, are contrasted with alternative conceptions centred on popular music and rights of ownership. This paper discusses the application of Basil Bernstein???s concept of recontextualisation to an exploratory study of seven experienced New Zealand secondary school music teachers??? perceptions and experiences of these two accounts of music education. It considers the role that pedagogic autonomy plays in maintaining the tension experienced by these teachers in their curriculum realisation as they continually seek balance in recontextualising musical and educational values for pedagogic purposes.

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  • Enriching Cognitive Behavior Therapy with Emotion Regulation Training for Patients with Multiple Medically Unexplained Symptoms (ENCERT): Design and implementation of a multicenter, randomized, active-controlled trial

    Kleinst??uber, Maria; Gottschalk, JM; Berking, M; Rau, J; Rief, W (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Introduction Although cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is the best evidenced psychological treatment for medically unexplained symptoms (MUS), effect sizes are rather moderate. Empirically evidenced deficits in emotion processing in patients with MUS make a CBT enriched with an emotion regulation training (ENCERT) a promising approach to increase treatment effects. Methods and design This protocol describes the development and implementation of a multicenter, randomized, active-controlled study with blinded outcome assessors to compare the efficacy of ENCERT with a conventional CBT for MUS. Individuals presenting with ??? 3 disabling, chronic MUS and fulfilling other predefined inclusion criteria are randomized to 20 sessions either of ENCERT or conventional CBT. Power calculations are based on the severity index of the Screening of Somatoform Disorders-7T and obtained an optimal sample size of N = 244. Questionnaires on symptom severity, symptom-related psychological features, and emotion regulation skills are administered at baseline, end of therapy, and 6-months follow-up. An every-session monitoring of therapy progress, and regular patients'/therapists' ratings of quality of therapy, working alliance, outcome expectations, and adverse events are conducted. Primary statistical analysis shall verify the hypothesis of ENCERT being more efficacious than conventional CBT regarding symptom severity. Discussion Enriching CBT with transdiagnostic therapeutic strategies addressing emotion regulation is a promising and new approach to target not only somatic symptom coping but also symptom-associated problems and comorbid mental disorders. The current trial will not only allow examining the efficacy of ENCERT but also important variables and mechanisms of the process of therapy. Trial registration: NCT01908855

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  • Knowledge and the curriculum: Music as a case study in educational futures

    McPhail, Graham (2012)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper utilises the three theoretical scenarios or ???educational futures??? developed by Michael Young and Johan Muller as reference points for discussing the curriculum conception approaches observed in a recent doctoral study in music education. In using Young and Muller???s model to move from case specifics to broader understandings of curriculum change I argue that cognisance of the relationship between informal and formal knowledge is a key issue in music education. Because of the growing role of popular music in the classroom (Green, 2008) providing access for students to varied forms of knowledge has become an important aspect of teachers??? work. This work involves making connections between aspects of the everyday informal knowledge that many music students bring to the classroom, and the conceptual knowledge of the discipline. The challenges involved in reframing informal knowledge may be relevant in other curriculum areas, particularly where knowledge content is susceptible to socio-cultural influences.

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  • A confirmatory factor analytic validation of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory

    Kleinst??uber, Maria; Frank, I; Weise, C (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Objective Because the postulated three-factor structure of the internationally widely used Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI) has not been confirmed yet by a confirmatory factor analytic approach this was the central aim of the current study. Methods From a clinical setting, N = 373 patients with chronic tinnitus completed the THI and further questionnaires assessing tinnitus-related and psychological variables. In order to analyze the psychometric properties of the THI, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and correlational analyses were conducted. Results CFA provided a statistically significant support for a better fit of the data to the hypothesized three-factor structure (RMSEA = .049, WRMR = 1.062, CFI = .965, TLI = .961) than to a general factor model (RMSEA = .062, WRMR = 1.258, CFI = .942, TLI = .937). The calculation of Cronbach's alpha as indicator of internal consistency revealed satisfactory values (.80???.91) with the exception of the catastrophic subscale (.65). High positive correlations of the THI and its subscales with other measures of tinnitus distress, anxiety, and depression, high negative correlations with tinnitus acceptance, moderate positive correlations with anxiety sensitivity, sleeping difficulties, tinnitus loudness, and small correlations with the Big Five personality dimensions confirmed construct validity. Conclusion Results show that the THI is a highly reliable and valid measure of tinnitus-related handicap. In contrast to results of previous exploratory analyses the current findings speak for a three-factor in contrast to a unifactorial structure. Future research is needed to replicate this result in different tinnitus populations.

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  • Music teachers talking: views on secondary school curriculum content

    McPhail, Graham (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This article reports on the views of secondary school music teachers in relation to curriculum content in New Zealand. We know very little about music teachers??? response to the cultural and educational changes of recent times and how these changes are being reflected and managed in their curriculum decision making. The article outlines and discusses responses obtained in a recent survey (N = 99). The data suggest that music teachers remain committed to progressive student-centred ideals as they struggle to balance demands for relevance in a crowded music curriculum with the changing nature of musical knowledge itself.

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  • Searching for standards in the NCEA: Assessing musical performance

    McPhail, Graham (2008)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In this paper it is argued that the theory and practice of standardsbased assessment within the context of the National Certificate of Educational Achievement (NCEA) has not been clearly articulated for teachers. The difficulty of specifying and promulgating standards in appropriate forms and the lack of clarity present in the support materials and training provided for teachers are examined. Through the analysis of an internally assessed Music Achievement Standard currently available in the NCEA, it will be argued that standards can be neither definitively described nor easily assessed, but that a credible standard is reliant on a number of components. It is the combination of these components that is significant if standards are to function effectively in summative contexts, particularly for high stakes national qualifications. The support materials and training music teachers received during the introduction of the NCEA lacked clarity and this has resulted in a weak link in the chain of components required for a robust assessment system. Teachers need access to quality support materials and the opportunity for on-going professional development in relation to standardsbased assessment.

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  • Crossing boundaries: Sharing concepts of music teaching from classroom to studio

    McPhail, Graham (2010)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This study demonstrates how action research can provide a means for teachers to undertake research for themselves to inform and enhance their work. The focus of the research was the self-critique of pedagogical practice in one-to-one classical instrumental music teaching within the context of the author???s private studio. A series of lessons were videotaped and analysed, and each week goals were set for the improvement of practice in relation to theoretical propositions derived from both one-to-one teaching and general pedagogical literature. The author is an experienced classroom teacher as well as a violin teacher so is well placed to explore potential links between these teaching contexts. The development of a model of teaching modes, greater awareness of feedback quality and type and the challenge of monitoring change in action emerged as the key themes. Student engagement increased and teaching was enriched by perspectives and practices from wider educational theory and practice.

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  • Emotion regulation in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS): Explicit and implicit assessments

    Eggert, L; Witth??ft, M; Hiller, W; Kleinst??uber, Maria (2016)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Psychological factors, such as cognitive-emotional processes, are proposed to play an important role in the etiology of premenstrual syndrome (PMS). Our aim was to determine whether there are differences in emotion regulation between women with PMS and non-PMS controls. The study included 54 women who suffered from PMS (confirmed by prospective daily ratings during two menstrual cycles), as well as 52 non-PMS controls. All participants completed the Cognitive Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (CERQ) as an explicit and the affect misattribution procedure (AMP) as an implicit measure of emotion regulation. Each participant conducted the self-report as well as the experimental assessments twice, once during the follicular phase and once during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. The AMP was conducted with neutral and negative picture and facial stimuli. Three different interstimulus intervals (100, 500, 1500 ms) were used to examine implicit emotion regulation processes. Women with PMS reported a significantly higher use of three dysfunctional emotion regulation strategies in the CERQ (p values < .001). In the AMP with picture stimuli, women with PMS showed stronger implicit negative affective reactions compared to non-PMS women, independent of menstrual cycle phase (p = .008). In the AMP with facial stimuli, this stronger negative affect misattribution appeared in women with PMS compared to the control group only in the luteal phase and only for medium interstimulus intervals of 500 ms (p = .050). The results suggest that PMS is associated with alterations in the processes of emotion regulation, as assessed both on an explicit and on an implicit level. Further research on the etiology of PMS should focus more on cognitive-emotional processing and its interaction with biological changes relating to the menstrual cycle.

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  • The changeability and predictive value of dysfunctional cognitions in cognitive behavior therapy for chronic tinnitus

    Conrad, I; Kleinst??uber, Maria; Jasper, K; Hiller, W; Andersson, G; Weise, C (2015)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Multidimensional tinnitus models describe dysfunctional cognitions as a complicating factor in the process of tinnitus habituation. However, this concept has rarely been investigated in previous research. Purpose The present study investigated the effects of two cognitive-behavioral treatments on dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions in patients with chronic tinnitus. Furthermore, dysfunctional cognitions were examined as possible predictors of the therapeutic effect on tinnitus distress. Method A total of 128 patients with chronic tinnitus were randomly assigned to either an Internet-delivered guided self-help treatment (Internet-based cognitive-behavioral therapy, ICBT), a conventional face-to-face group therapy (cognitive???behavioral group therapy, GCBT), or an active control group in the form of a web-based discussion forum (DF). To assess tinnitus-related dysfunctional thoughts, the Tinnitus Cognitions Scale (T-Cog) was used at pre- and post-assessment, as well as at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. Results Multivariate ANOVAs with post hoc tests revealed significant and comparable reductions of dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions for both treatments (GCBT and ICBT), which remained stable over a 6- and 12-month period. Negative correlations were found between the catastrophic subscale of the T-Cog and therapy outcome for ICBT, but not for GCBT. This means a higher degree of catastrophic thinking at baseline was associated with lower benefit from ICBT directly after the treatment. Hierarchical regression analysis confirmed catastrophizing as a predictor of poorer therapy outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. No associations were detected in the follow-up assessments. Conclusion Both forms of CBT are successful in reducing dysfunctional tinnitus-related cognitions. Catastrophizing significantly predicted a less favorable outcome regarding emotional tinnitus distress in ICBT. Clinical implications of these results are described. Dysfunctional cognitions could be targeted more intensively in therapy and in future research on tinnitus.

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  • Pharmacological interventions for somatoform disorders in adults

    Kleinst??uber, Maria; Witth??ft, M; Steffanowski, A; Van Marwijk, H; Hiller, W; Lambert, MJ (2014)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background Somatoform disorders are characterised by chronic, medically unexplained physical symptoms (MUPS). Although different medications are part of treatment routines for people with somatoform disorders in clinics and private practices, there exists no systematic review or meta-analysis on the efficacy and tolerability of these medications. We aimed to synthesise to improve optimal treatment decisions. Objectives To assess the effects of pharmacological interventions for somatoform disorders (specifically somatisation disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder, somatoform autonomic dysfunction, and pain disorder) in adults. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Review Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR) (to 17 January 2014). This register includes relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from The Cochrane Library (all years), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE (1974 to date), and PsycINFO (1967 to date). To identify ongoing trials, we searched ClinicalTrials.gov, Current Controlled Trials metaRegister, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the Chinese Clinical Trials Registry. For grey literature, we searched ProQuest Dissertation & Theses Database, OpenGrey, and BIOSIS Previews. We handsearched conference proceedings and reference lists of potentially relevant papers and systematic reviews and contacted experts in the field. Selection criteria We selected RCTs or cluster RCTs of pharmacological interventions versus placebo, treatment as usual, another medication, or a combination of different medications for somatoform disorders in adults. We included people fulfilling standardised diagnostic criteria for somatisation disorder, undifferentiated somatoform disorder, somatoform autonomic dysfunction, or somatoform pain disorder. Data collection and analysis One review author and one research assistant independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Primary outcomes included the severity of MUPS on a continuous measure, and acceptability of treatment. Main results We included 26 RCTs (33 reports), with 2159 participants, in the review. They examined the efficacy of different types of antidepressants, the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic, antipsychotics alone, or natural products (NPs). The duration of the studies ranged between two and 12 weeks. One meta-analysis of placebo-controlled studies showed no clear evidence of a significant difference between tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) and placebo for the outcome severity of MUPS (SMD -0.13; 95% CI -0.39 to 0.13; 2 studies, 239 participants; I2 = 2%; low-quality evidence). For new-generation antidepressants (NGAs), there was very low-quality evidence showing they were effective in reducing the severity of MUPS (SMD -0.91; 95% CI -1.36 to -0.46; 3 studies, 243 participants; I2 = 63%). For NPs there was low-quality evidence that they were effective in reducing the severity of MUPS (SMD -0.74; 95% CI -0.97 to -0.51; 2 studies, 322 participants; I2 = 0%). One meta-analysis showed no clear evidence of a difference between TCAs and NGAs for severity of MUPS (SMD -0.16; 95% CI -0.55 to 0.23; 3 studies, 177 participants; I2 = 42%; low-quality evidence). There was also no difference between NGAs and other NGAs for severity of MUPS (SMD -0.16; 95% CI -0.45 to 0.14; 4 studies, 182 participants; I2 = 0%). Finally, one meta-analysis comparing selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) with a combination of SSRIs and antipsychotics showed low-quality evidence in favour of combined treatment for severity of MUPS (SMD 0.77; 95% CI 0.32 to 1.22; 2 studies, 107 participants; I2 = 23%). Differences regarding the acceptability of the treatment (rate of all-cause drop-outs) were neither found between NGAs and placebo (RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.64 to 1.61; 2 studies, 163 participants; I2 = 0%; low-quality evidence) or NPs and placebo (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.40 to 1.78; 3 studies, 506 participants; I2 = 0%; low-quality evidence); nor between TCAs and other medication (RR 1.48, 95% CI 0.59 to 3.72; 8 studies, 556 participants; I2 =14%; low-quality evidence); nor between antidepressants and the combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic (RR 0.80, 95% CI 0.25 to 2.52; 2 studies, 118 participants; I2 = 0%; low-quality evidence). Percental attrition rates due to adverse effects were high in all antidepressant treatments (0% to 32%), but low for NPs (0% to 1.7%). The risk of bias was high in many domains across studies. Seventeen trials (65.4%) gave no information about random sequence generation and only two (7.7%) provided information about allocation concealment. Eighteen studies (69.2%) revealed a high or unclear risk in blinding participants and study personnel; 23 studies had high risk of bias relating to blinding assessors. For the comparison NGA versus placebo, there was relatively high imprecision and heterogeneity due to one outlier study. Although we identified 26 studies, each comparison only contained a few studies and small numbers of participants so the results were imprecise. Authors' conclusions The current review found very low-quality evidence for NGAs and low-quality evidence for NPs being effective in treating somatoform symptoms in adults when compared with placebo. There was some evidence that different classes of antidepressants did not differ in efficacy; however, this was limited and of low to very low quality. These results had serious shortcomings such as the high risk of bias, strong heterogeneity in the data, and small sample sizes. Furthermore, the significant effects of antidepressant treatment have to be balanced against the relatively high rates of adverse effects. Adverse effects produced by medication can have amplifying effects on symptom perceptions, particularly in people focusing on somatic symptoms without medical causes. We can only draw conclusions about short-term efficacy of the pharmacological interventions because no trial included follow-up assessments. For each of the comparisons where there were available data on acceptability rates (NGAs versus placebo, NPs versus placebo, TCAs versus other medication, and antidepressants versus a combination of an antidepressant and an antipsychotic), no clear differences between the intervention and comparator were found. Future high-quality research should be carried out to determine the effectiveness of medications other than antidepressants, to compare antidepressants more thoroughly, and to follow-up participants over longer periods (the longest follow up was just 12 weeks). Another idea for future research would be to include other outcomes such as functional impairment or dysfunctional behaviours and cognitions as well as the classical outcomes such as symptom severity, depression, or anxiety.

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  • Mass transfer to droplets formed by the controlled breakup of a cylindrical jet - physical absorption

    Hoh, ST; Farid, Mohammed; Chen, John (2012-05-07)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    The derivation of Srinivasan and Aiken (1988) for the mass transfer coefficient of carbon dioxide absorption into water droplets formed by controlled breakup of capillary jet was based on turbulent flow equations. This derivation was re-examined, taking into account the fact that the data used were in fact in the laminar flow regime. An alternative derivation and correlation is presented.

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  • Mixed pedagogic modalities: The potential for increased student engagement and success

    McPhail, Graham (2013)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper utilises the three theoretical scenarios or ???educational futures??? developed by Michael Young and Johan Muller as reference points for discussing the curriculum conception approaches observed in a recent doctoral study in music education. In using Young and Muller???s model to move from case specifics to broader understandings of curriculum change I argue that cognisance of the relationship between informal and formal knowledge is a key issue in music education. Because of the growing role of popular music in the classroom (Green, 2008) providing access for students to varied forms of knowledge has become an important aspect of teachers??? work. This work involves making connections between aspects of the everyday informal knowledge that many music students bring to the classroom, and the conceptual knowledge of the discipline. The challenges involved in reframing informal knowledge may be relevant in other curriculum areas, particularly where knowledge content is susceptible to socio-cultural influences.

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  • Effect of liquid fraction and bubble size distribution on the polarised light scattering characteristics of Casein foam

    Qian, S; Chen, John (2015-01-27)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    A polarised light scattering experimental set-up was designed to conduct experiments using Casein foams with monodispersed and bidispersed bubble size distributions. Foams were initially generated under forced drainage conditions to maintain a uniform axial liquid fraction profile. Subsequently, the foams entered a free drainage period. During this period, the liquid fraction, the bubble size distribution and the polarisation parameters of scattered light due to the foam were measured individually. It was found that both the liquid fraction and the bubble size distribution of Casein foams varied simultaneously with drainage time. Therefore, multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the individual effect of these two foam factors on the polarisation state. Four of the polarisation parameters (degree of polarisation, degree of linear polarisation, degree of circular polarisation, ellipticity angle) were shown to be associated with the liquid fraction and/or the bubble size distribution to different extents. However, the remaining parameter, orientation angle, was completely independent of the liquid fraction and the bubble size distribution. These results can be used for the development of the polarised light scattering method in the study of protein foams.

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  • Effects of interpretive nutrition labels on consumer food purchases: The Starlight randomized controlled trial

    Ni Mhurchu, Cliona; Volkova, E; Jiang, Yannan; Eyles, Helen; Michie, J; Neal, B; Blakely, T; Swinburn, Boyd; Rayner, M (2017-03)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Background: Nutrition labeling is a prominent policy to promote healthy eating.Objective: We aimed to evaluate the effects of 2 interpretive nutrition labels compared with a noninterpretive label on consumer food purchases.Design: In this parallel-group randomized controlled trial, we enrolled household shoppers across New Zealand who owned smartphones and were aged ???18 y. Eligible participants were randomly assigned (1:1:1) to receive either traffic light labels (TLLs), Health Star Rating labels (HSRs), or a control [nutrition information panel (NIP)]. Smartphone technology allowed participants to scan barcodes of packaged foods and to receive allocated labels on their smartphone screens. The primary outcome was the mean healthiness of all packaged food purchases over the 4-wk intervention period, which was measured by using the Food Standards Australia New Zealand Nutrient Profiling Scoring Criterion (NPSC).Results: Between October 2014 and November 2015, 1357 eligible shoppers were randomly assigned to TLL (n = 459), HSR (n = 443), or NIP (n = 455) labels. Overall difference in the mean transformed NPSC score for the TLL group compared with the NIP group was -0.20 (95% CI: -0.94, 0.54; P = 0.60). The corresponding difference for HSR compared with NIP was -0.60 (95% CI: -1.35, 0.15; P = 0.12). In an exploratory per-protocol analysis of participants who used the labeling intervention more often than average (n = 423, 31%), those who were assigned to TLL and HSR had significantly better NPSC scores [TLL compared with NIP: -1.33 (95% CI: -2.63, -0.04; P = 0.04); HSR compared with NIP: -1.70 (95% CI: -2.97, -0.43; P = 0.01)]. Shoppers who were randomly assigned to HSR and TLL also found the labels significantly more useful and easy to understand than the NIP (all P values <0.001).Conclusions: At the relatively low level of use observed in this trial, interpretive nutrition labels had no significant effect on food purchases. However, shoppers who used interpretive labels found them to be significantly more useful and easy to understand, and compared with frequent NIP users, frequent TLL and HSR users had significantly healthier food purchases. This trial was registered at the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366446&isReview=true) as ACTRN12614000644662.

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  • Peak load shifting with energy storage and price-based control system

    Barzin, R; Chen, John; Young, Brent; Farid, Mohammed (2015-12-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper presents an analysis of a price-based control system in conjunction with energy storage using phase change materials for two applications: space heating in buildings and domestic freezers. The freezer used for this experimental study was provided with energy storage trays containing a eutectic solution of ammonium chloride (melting point of -15??C). In the building application, DuPont wallboards were used to provide thermal storage. Experimental results showed that using thermal storage material in conjunction with the proposed price-based control method can improve performance of these systems and lead to a successful peak load shifting. Depending on electricity price trends, cost savings using the proposed strategy can vary. Savings of up to 16.5% and 62.64% per day were achieved for the freezer and building applications respectively, based on New Zealand electricity rates.

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  • Using a pressure-state-practice model to develop safety leading indicators for construction projects

    Guo, BHW; Yiu, Tak Wing; Gonzalez, Vicente; Goh, YM (2017-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper aims to develop a set of safety leading indicators that can be used by construction companies to assess safety levels and measure safety performance at the project level. The development process follows a four-step method: conceptualization, operationalization, indicator generation, and validation and revision. A pressure-state-practice (PSP) model is developed as an overall framework for developing safety leading indicators. The safety level of a construction project is conceptualized as a high-level abstract construct that can be assessed by state indicators, pressure indicators, and practice indicators. Criterion validity (i.e., concurrent validity and predictive validity), practicability, and cost-effectiveness of the leading indicators were qualitatively tested and supported by the empirical evidence collected from three construction projects. This paper adds to the literature on the development of safety leading indicators for the construction industry. The safety leading indicators developed in this paper provide the construction industry a promising tool to proactively measure safety performance and facilitate safety assessments.

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  • Application of PCM energy storage in combination with night ventilation for space cooling

    Barzin, R; Chen, John; Young, Brent; Farid, Mohammed (2015-11-15)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    In recent years, as a result of the continuous increase in energy demand, the use of energy storage has become increasingly important. To address this problem, the application of phase change materials (PCM) in buildings has received attention because of their high energy storage density and their ease of incorporation in building envelopes. Despite large experimental works conducted on the application phase change materials in buildings, there is very little work done on this application in combination with night ventilation. In this study, the application of night ventilation in combination with PCM-impregnated gypsum boards for cooling purposes was experimentally investigated. Two identical test huts equipped with ???smart??? control systems were used for testing the concept. One hut was constructed using impregnated gypsum boards, while the other hut was finished with ordinary gypsum board. Initially an air conditioning (AC) unit, without night ventilation, was used in both huts to charge the PCM during low peak period, showing very little savings in electricity. However, when night ventilation was used to charge the PCM instead, a weekly electricity saving of 73% was achieved.

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  • Comparison of mechanical behaviors of several bulk metallic glasses for biomedical application

    Sun, Y; Huang, Y; Fan, H; Liu, F; Shen, J; Sun, J; Chen, John (2014-12-15)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Bulk metallic glass (BMG), Zr46Cu37.6Ag8.4Al8 (ZrCuAlAg), has been systematically evaluated in terms of microstructure, compressive properties, andwear resistance, aimed at exploring its use as a novel biomedical material. For comparison, the above-mentioned tests were also performed on Zr51.9Cu23.3Ni10.5Al14.3, Zr51Ti5Ni10Cu25Al9, and Ti40Zr25Ni12Cu3Be20BMGs, pure Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy. ZrCuAlAg BMGexhibits higher strength, higher hardness, and better wear resistance than other materials. All the results imply that the Ag-bearing ZrCuAlAg BMG with excellent mechanocompatibility will open up a new path for biomedical applications.

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  • Analysis of smelting cell experimental trial data

    Chen, John; Taylor, Mark (2012-02)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Analysis and discussion are presented for the various schemes that may be used in evaluating results such as the current efficiency (CE) obtained from aluminum smelting cell performance trials. A conventional parametric (requiring normal distribution of data) and a nonparametric (not requiring normal distribution) statistical method are given. The analysis allows the results obtained to be expressed in statistical terms with a known level of significance, thus providing a more scientific basis for the interpretation of the results. A scheme for experimental design that takes into account inherent variations and the use of a nonparametric statistical test which does not stipulate normal distribution of data are both suggested.

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  • From singular to over crowded region: Curriculum change in senior secondary school music in New Zealand

    McPhail, Graham (2012-11)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    This paper discusses recent developments in the senior music curriculum in New Zealand. I suggest that school music is in transition from its clearly defined origins to its ???regionalisation??? by new content and knowledge. The concepts of knowledge differentiation and verticality are considered in relation to the subject???s now diverse range of curriculum segments, and I argue that the varied progression requirements of these segments combined with an ???emptying out??? of significant aspects of knowledge within an outcomes-based curriculum presents significant challenges for curriculum construction and pedagogy. Also vying for space within the curriculum are elements of informal music learning. These challenges need to be carefully considered in light of recent social realist critiques which highlight the significance of the relationship between knowledge structures, curriculum, pedagogy and student access to powerful knowledge.

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