5,543 results for ScholarlyCommons@AUT

  • Chiropractic Intervention and the Control of Eye Movement in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Pilot Study

    Cade, Alice Elizabeth

    Masters Research Project thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a multifaceted brain-based disorder that is often associated with adverse changes in the capacity to control eye movements when tracking visual stimuli, otherwise referred to as oculomotor function. Sensorimotor integration, defined as the capability of the central nervous system to integrate different sources of stimuli in parallel and to transform such inputs into appropriate motor actions, is essential for proper oculomotor function. Previous research has shown chiropractic care alters sensorimotor integration in brain areas also thought to be responsible for some of the cognitive and oculomotor deficits exhibited by those with ADHD. Objectives: This study tested the implementation of all study processes. Secondary aims were to examine the preliminary efficacy of a chiropractic intervention, aimed at improving spinal function, on oculomotor outcomes in children with ADHD. Methods: Thirty children between 8-15 years were recruited for a randomised controlled crossover pilot study to test all study processes, including recruitment, data collection, and general study management. The study also investigated chiropractic intervention versus an active control intervention on measures of oculomotor outcomes. Oculomotor function was tested before and after each intervention using a computerised eye tracker that measured target acquisition, reading speed, fixation time, and saccade length. Results: The study proved successful in its procedural testing; participant recruitment was completed in eleven weeks, with 100% retention and zero drop-outs, the outcomes measured were a reliable indicator of oculomotor function, and not susceptible to participant’s effort, researcher influence or parental reporting bias. Additionally, 85-100% of participants and guardians agreed or strongly agreed with statements evaluating the study, an overwhelmingly positive response. However, 40% of participants were unable to complete some part of the pre or post intervention outcome measures due to equipment calibration issues. Future research or clinical trials are recommended, with some modification of the study’s processes (for example improved eye tracking equipment and study settings). Secondary findings revealed a significant reduction (p = .034) was observed in the total reading time post chiropractic intervention (mean reduction: 646.87ms) compared to post control intervention (mean reduction: 108.35ms). No significant group differences pre or post chiropractic or control intervention in target acquisition time or number of distractions off-target (p > .05). Conclusions: This study is a successful pilot for further research in the area of chiropractic and oculomotor outcomes, proving feasible in terms of recruitment, data collection, outcome measurements used, and ease of testing procedures. Additionally, this study’s secondary findings open up the possibility that chiropractic care may have a role in improving reading ability and oculomotor function.

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  • Navigating Two Worlds: Pacific Island Experiences and Contribution to Non-playing Participation in Rugby

    Dee, K; Ferkins, L; Naylor, M; Bryham, G

    Report
    Auckland University of Technology

    New Zealand Rugby (NZR) recognise there is a significant difference between the number of Pacific Island rugby players, and the number of Pacific Island people participating in non-playing rugby in Auckland. Through exploring the perspectives of Pacific Island rugby community members, this project aims to help NZR develop a better understanding of this ‘issue’. Key recommendations are proposed for moving forward towards greater awareness and appreciation of the Pacific Island culture. Eight Pacific Island rugby community members were selected based on their experience, insight and ability to share their perspective and that of their wider community. Individual in-depth interviews were conducted and a breadth of rich, insightful data were collected, allowing for key themes to develop. We learnt that to the Pacific people, this ‘lack’ of participation in non-playing rugby is not necessarily an ‘issue’ and that instead a better understanding of the Pacific Island way is needed. We adopted two lenses that represent the stories and key messages of the interviewees. Firstly, ‘Appreciating Pacific Island Cultural Values’, which encompasses the importance of family, the significance of church and church commitments, and the strong service orientation of the Pacific Island people. The second lens, ‘Perspectives on Leadership’, is strongly underpinned by the Samoan proverb “The pathway to leadership is through service”. We heard that Pacific Island philosophies on leadership encompasses informal, collectivist approaches, focusing on people and relationships which augments titles and roles. It was revealed that Europeans are usually viewed as the authority figures and the systems are often aligned with a more European approach. An overall theme that developed was the idea of Pacific Island people ‘navigating two worlds’ as they live as a Pacific Island New Zealander. Our recommendations are based around NZR enabling the Pacific people to continue to journey through these two worlds within the rugby community through focusing on two key areas; a) enhancing the understanding of Pacific Island culture within the New Zealand Rugby community and b) creating a shared understanding of leadership between Pakeha and Pacific Island members of the NZR community. These are linked to four recommendations; 1) development of a Pacific Island advisory group, 2) implementation of cultural awareness workshops for decision makers, 3) insights driven implementation and communication, and 4) a targeted leadership initiative for 20-25 Pacific Island rugby community members. In summary, we acknowledge that this is not a process of fixing an issue but instead an opportunity to engage with and better understand the Pacific Island community within rugby. We believe in turn this will lead to more involvement of Pasifika people in non-playing rugby activities, enhanced playing experiences, and a strengthened New Zealand Rugby community

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  • Liquidity, Monetary Policy and Unemployment: A New Monetarist Approach

    Xiao, X; Dong, M


    Auckland University of Technology

    We discover a consumption channel of monetary policy in a model with money and government bonds. When the central bank withdraws government bonds (short-term or long-term) through open market operations, it lowers returns on bonds. The lower return has a direct negative impact on consumption by households that hold bonds, and an indirect negative impact on consumption by households that hold money. As a result, Örms earn less proÖts from production, which leads to higher unemployment. The existence of such a consumption channel can help us understand the e§ects of unconventional monetary policy.

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  • Courage, Freedom and Educational Know-how

    Devine, N; Benade, L

    Unclassified
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Moving from Te Po (Night) and into Te Ao (Light): An Indigenous Framework to Support Māori Males Who Have Been Sexually Abused in New Zealand

    Stevens II, Alexander Windsor

    Masters Research Projects thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Sexual abuse is a public health threat to the wellbeing of all people in New Zealand. The costs of sexual violence have been estimated by New Zealand Treasury in 2006 to be over a billion dollars a year. Current statistics suggest that females are more likely to be sexually abused than males. However research has indicated that men (in general) have separate challenges coming forward to discuss being sexually abused. For indigenous males the challenges are even more demanding than tauiwi (non-Māori) men. Excluding ethnicity, male experiences of being sexually abused in general are under reported in New Zealand. This can mean men present with on-going problems that may damage them physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. When indigenous men access health or social services Māori and Pacific frameworks are often used to ensure culturally appropriate care is given. This can include Te Whare Tapa Wha and Te Wheke. However there are limitations to these indigenous frameworks when sexual abuse is factored in. Given this a new approach is needed to understand the complexities of being sexually abused, and to find culturally appropriate ways forward. Effectively finding solutions that deal with prevention and recovery from sexual abuse will greatly reduce the mental health and addiction burden in New Zealand. To meet the gaps identified the researcher has developed a framework and tool based on ancestral knowledge of both Māori people (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand) and the Ojibwa people (one of the largest groups of indigenous people that are divided between the United States and Canada). The results of the project suggest a positive way forward, towards healing and recovering from sexual abuse. This will be used as the basis for on-going exploration and study.

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  • Assessing the Sulfide Footprint of Mussel Farms With Sediment Profile Imagery: A New Zealand Trial

    Wilson, PS; Vopel, K

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Growing numbers and increased stocking of marine mussel farms make reliable techniques for environmental effect assessment a priority. Previously, we showed how the color intensity of soft sediment could be used to estimate its acid volatile sulfide (AVS) content, a product of the anaerobic microbial degradation of organic matter deposits. We then proposed to include assessments of the AVS farm footprint in marine farm monitoring, in particular, to investigate temporal changes in the extent of the seafloor area of elevated sediment AVS content. Such assessment requires accurate detection of the AVS footprint boundary. Here, we demonstrate how to detect this boundary with analyses of sediment color intensity. We analyzed 182 sediment profile images taken along three transects leading from approximately 50 m inside to 200 m outside a long-line mussel farm in New Zealand and found that the mean sediment color intensity inside the farm boundary was almost one third lower than that of the sediment distant from the farm. Segmented regression analysis of the combined color intensity data revealed a breakpoint in the trend of increasing grey values with increasing distance from the farm at 56 ± 13 m (± 95% confidence interval of the breakpoint) outside the mussel farm. Mapping of grey value data with ArcMap (ESRI, ArcGIS) indicated that the extent of the color intensity footprint is a function of water column depth; organic particles disperse further in a deeper seawater column. We conclude that for soft coastal sediments, our sampling and data analysis techniques may provide a rapid and reliable supplement to existing benthic surveys that assess environmental effects of mussel farms.

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  • The Impact of Individual's Identities on the Infusion of Information Systems Within an Organisation

    Hassandoust, Farkhondeh

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Organisations invest substantially in enterprise systems such as customer relationship management (CRM) systems with the planned expectation that employees will utilise these systems to enhance organisational efficiency. An underutilisation of information systems (IS) by employees often impedes organisations from gaining the full expected benefits from theirtechnology investments. While different reasons may explain why IS investments do not bring about the expected result, a recurrent theme is the fact that these systems are rarely infused into employees’ work practices. Although much research effort has focused on identifying the influencing factors of IS infusion behaviours, most of the investigated factors are related to rational behaviours, which are more appropriate to explain IS use in the early stages of IS implementation. In order to examine political behaviours like IS infusion behaviours, psychological factors, particularly those related to identities, need to be examined. Thus, this study aims to provide a better understanding of IS infusion behaviours by: i) examining IS infusion behaviour as well as extended use, integrative use and emergent use behaviours within an organisation.; ii) investigating the influence of individuals’ IT identity as person identity and IS infusion role identity, on individuals’ IS infusion behaviours within an organisation. IT identity as person identity refers to the extent to which a person views the use of IT as integral to her/his sense of self. IS infusion role identity refers to the extent to which employees personally view that using an information system to its fullest potential is an important part of their sense of self as employees. Drawing on identity theories, two research models are developed to identify and evaluate the key psychological and sociological driving factors (i.e., identities) influencing IS infusion behaviours. Three identity theoretical lenses – Stryker’s identity theory, Burke’s identity theory, McCall and Simmons’ identity theory – are adopted to explain the effects of IT identity and IS infusion role identity on employees’ IS infusion behaviours within an organisation. The integrated research models are empirically validated using a dataset of 413 cloud CRM users. The partial least squares – structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM) technique is used to analyse the data. The results reveal that IT identity and IS infusion role identity positively influence employees’ IS infusion behaviour as well as their extended use, integrative use and emergent use behaviours. IS infusion role identity mediates the relationship between IT identity and IS infusion behaviours. In addition, organisational valuing of IS infusion moderates the relationship between employees’ IS infusion role identity and their IS infusion behaviour within an organisation. This study has theoretical and practical contributions. Drawing on identity theories, this study provides an integrated theoretical model for understanding individual IS infusion behaviour and its three sub-dimensions in organisations. In addition, this study extends current identity theories by making a linkage between individuals’ person identity and role identity. The findings provide managers with insights into factors that explain IS infusion behaviours. This study provides a framework for managers to develop guidelines to encourage employees to fully utilise IS in organisations. Moreover, managers may find it useful to prepare ongoing socialisation programs to reinforce and reward the desired identity-related behaviours of employees.

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  • A Māori Crisis in Science Education?

    Stewart, G

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    This article is written for teachers in Aotearoa New Zealand schools who teach science to Year 7-10 students or as part of a primary classroom programme under NZC (the New Zealand Curriculum). What can teachers do about inequity in science education for Māori students? Clear understanding of this complex issue is required, so this article offers a synopsis of the Māori science curriculum debate. Written from my perspective as an insider-researcher interested in this topic for many years, this article engages with important comments about Māori-medium science education made by Sir Peter Gluckman in a major report on science education (2011), and an earlier challenge by Graham Hingangaroa Smith (1995) about the ‘Māori crisis’ in science education. The article lists and discusses options for teachers, including the potential of ‘bilingual science’ both as a useful practical approach for any classroom teacher, and as a way of navigating the current theoretical impasse or ‘crisis’ in Māori science education.

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  • Touring Blockbuster Exhibitions: Their Contribution to the Marketing of a City to Tourists

    Gorchakova, Valentina

    Doctoral thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Touring ‘blockbuster’ exhibitions (TBEs) are major international exhibitions that present collections of works of art, cultural objects, natural history or memorabilia. These exhibitions are of a limited duration, occur infrequently and attract local residents and tourists who travel specifically to view them. TBEs offer exciting experiences and may positively affect the profile of a host city. Although touring blockbuster exhibitions possess the attributes of special events, these exhibitions have received little attention in the event and tourism studies literature, or in the field of destination marketing. The primary research question this study addresses is: How do touring blockbuster exhibitions contribute to city tourism marketing? The growing importance of the creation and delivery of memorable experiences in tourism, and the increasing awareness of the long term effects that events have on a host city’s identity and image, underpin the research. An exploratory qualitative multiple case study was conducted in four cities: Auckland and Wellington in New Zealand, and Canberra and Melbourne in Australia. The chosen methodology allowed an investigation of TBEs within four diverse settings, enabled a deeper understanding of the processes within each case and was beneficial for drawing commonalities and variations across the cases. The Melbourne case proved to be the most advanced in terms of hosting of TBEs, while Auckland has yet to find ways to exploit the potential of these events. Policy planners in the capital cities support TBEs not only to attract tourists but are also guided by the rationale of being the centre of the nation and the country. The methods of data collection included qualitative interviewing and document analysis. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with city policy makers and cultural institutions that have hosted TBEs. The interviews helped to access the information pertinent to the ways city tourism and events authorities approach TBEs and utilise these exhibitions in city marketing. Documents were used to navigate the specifics of the contexts, define the questions for interviews and provide supplementary and corroborative data. Thematic analysis was applied to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the topic and address the research objectives. An integrative model is developed that reveals the ways TBEs can contribute to the experiential dimension of a city’s tourism offering, its tourism product mix, brand image and long term tourism marketing objectives. The findings demonstrate that TBEs can be valuable assets for city event planners and destination marketers. The brand stature of these events is remarkably powerful; they can provide enriching and engaging experiences for visitors. This research reconceptualises the TBE as a major city event. The results present an important contribution to the events and tourism literature in advancing understanding of the role TBEs can play in tourism offerings, city events agendas and the marketing of cities. The research offers a new perspective on the problematics of major city cultural events, such as high-profile international exhibitions, and reveals the dynamics that affect their hosting and legacy. Practical implications relate to the hosting of TBEs in a way that supports city identity and enhances city competitiveness.

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  • Women in the Boardroom and Their Impact on Climate Change Related Disclosure

    Momin, M; Hossain, M; Farooque, O; Almotairy, O

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Purpose - This paper aims to investigate the relationship between gender diversity and the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) score/index. Specifically, the study describes extant research on theoretical perspectives, and the impact of women on corporate boards (WOB) on carbon emission issues in the global perspective. Design/methodology/approach - This study uses the carbon disclosure scores of the Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) from 2011 to 2013 (inclusive). A total observation for the three year periods is 1175 companies. However, based on data availability for the model, our sample size totals 331 companies in 33 countries with firms in 12 geographical locations. We used a model which is estimated using the fixed-effects estimator. Findings -The outcomes of the study reveal that there is a positive relationship between gender diversity (WOB) and carbon disclosure information. In addition to establishing a relationship between CDP score and other control variables, this study also found a relationship with Board size, asset size, energy consumption, and Tobin’s Q, which is common in the existing literature. Research limitations/implications -The limitations of the study mostly revolve around samples and the time period. To further test the generalizability and cross-sectional validity of the outcomes, it is suggested that the proposed framework be tested in more socially responsible firms. Practical implications -There are increasing pressures for WOBs from diverse stakeholders, such as the European Commission, national governments, politicians, employer lobby groups, shareholders, Fortune and FTSE rankings and best places for women to work lists. The study offers insights to policy makers implementing gender quota legislation. Originality/value -The study has important implications for putting into practice good corporate governance and in particular, gender diversity. The outcomes of our analyses advocate that companies that included women directors and with a smaller board size may expect to achieve a higher level of carbon emission performance and to voluntarily disclose the level of carbon information assessment requested by the CDP.

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  • Leading Teacher Professional Learning for Innovative Learning Environments: A Critical Analysis

    Humber, Matt

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Innovative Learning Environments (ILE), encouraged by the OECD and driven by government funding, are presenting opportunities and complex inter-relational, administrative and pedagogical problems for teachers and leaders in schools. Designed to present flexibility, openness and access to resources, the ILE removes the barriers of a traditional single cell classroom to one of a community forum. The metamorphosis to ILEs is inextricably linked to shifts in expectations of bespoke teacher professional learning. Consequently, the role of school leaders bifurcates to not only connect teachers with unchartered professional learning but, also, balance the inter-relational dynamics exposed by the context of moving to ILEs. This thesis attempts to unpack the micro influences involved in sustaining pedagogical change and how leaders enable the ILE philosophy to embed within the fabric of school culture. The research found that minimal professional learning exists to facilitate the prescribed transition to ILE. This has left some leaders interpreting a pathway that fits the culture of their school. It has also meant that essential forms of learning and assessment are now being re-understood or re-engineered to fit the ILE philosophy. Coupled with those conditions are the inter-relational dynamics generated when colleagues are required to share a teaching space. A qualitative methodology was employed for this research, focusing on two New Zealand schools, one intermediate (Year 7 and 8) and one primary through to intermediate (Year 1 through to Year 8). Across the two research sites, semi-structured interviews were undertaken with two principals, one deputy principal, one associate principal, three team leaders, and four teachers working across two academic year levels.

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  • Resource Management for Business Process Scheduling in the Presence of Availability Constraints

    Xu, J; Liu, C; Zhao, X; Yongchareon, S; Ding, Z

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    In the context of business process management, the resources required by business processes, such as workshop staff, manufacturing machines, etc., tend to follow certain availability patterns, due to maintenance cycles, work shifts and other factors. Such availability patterns heavily influence the efficiency and effectiveness of enterprise resource management. Most existing process scheduling and resource management approaches tend to tune the process structure to seek better resource utilisation, yet neglect the constraints on resource availability. In this article, we investigate the scheduling of business process instances in accordance with resource availability patterns, to find out how enterprise resources can be rationally and sufficiently used. Three heuristic-based planning strategies are proposed to maximise the process instance throughput together with another strategy based on a genetic algorithm. The performance of these strategies has been evaluated by conducting experiments of different settings and analysing the strategy characteristics.

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  • Using Spiritual Intelligence to Transform Organizational Cultures

    McGhee, P; Grant, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Recently spirituality has become a viable topic of discussion for management scholars seeking a means to enhance work cultures and improve organisational effectiveness. However, the path from spirituality to transforming organisational culture is not immediately obvious. Fortunately, several authors have developed frameworks that provide connections. In particular, the notion of spiritual intelligence (SI hereafter) is helpful. This paper begins by describing spirituality and SI in the context of organisational transformation. It then details research involving working professionals that sought to answer the question: “How (and why) might SI transform organisational culture to be more ethical?” It concludes with discussion and implications of developing and practicing SI in organisational contexts.

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  • Breathing Therapy Air Delivery Unit: Simulation, Design and Development

    White, David Edward

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Although constant positive airway pressure therapy is currently the most effective form of non-invasive treatment to relieve obstructive sleep apnea symptoms, it has relatively low treatment compliance due to pressure related side effects. Existing commercial continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices rely on the combined airflow characteristics of both the air delivery unit and nasal mask vent to regulate treatment pressure. Fluctuation in mask pressure occurs however, due to patient breathing, presenting an opportunity to develop an alternative breathing therapy device capable of achieving dynamic control of mask pressure. Within this research, a computer model of a proposed patient breathing therapy device, based on characteristics of a prototype system, is developed to determine the breathing system air delivery requirements whilst operating under a simulated patient breathing load. This model initially utilises an idealised, zero order, air delivery unit behaviour, since this system element is yet to be built. A review of different types of air compressors is undertaken and the diaphragm type compressor selected as being best suited for practical implementation within the air delivery unit of the breathing system, based on constraints of air quality, available machining resource and materials. Thermodynamic design of the compressor is undertaken to determine physical dimensions and a range of actuation methods are reviewed, based on force and speed requirements. A speed controlled 3 phase AC induction motor is selected to actuate the compressor. The diaphragm compressor is built and tested under both steady state and dynamic conditions and proven capable of meeting the breathing system air supply for both air pressure and flow requirements. The air delivery unit within the model simulation, previously based on an idealised, zero order element, is characterised with the same dynamic behaviour as the prototype unit built, established during testing, and shown by simulation to meet the breathing system requirements under dynamic patient breathing load. Implementation of the air delivery unit within the completed prototype breathing system shows the mask pressure to fluctuate outside the desire pressure tolerance range; however, to remedy this situation, the compressor requires the development of an appropriate control scheme which is beyond the scope of this work.

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  • The TANAMI Multiwavelength Program: Dynamic SEDs of Southern Blazars

    Krauß, F; Wilms, J; Kadler, M; Ojha, R; Schulz, R; Trüstedt, J; Edwards, PG; Stevens, J; Ros, E; Baumgartner, W; Beuchert, T; Blanchard, J; Buson, S; Carpenter, B; Dauser, T; Falkner, S; Gehrels, N; Gräfe, C; Gulyaev, S; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Kreikenbohm, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Langejahn, M; Leiter, K; Lovell, JEJ; Müller, C; Natusch, T; Nesci, R; Pursimo, T; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Quick, J; Tzioumis, AK; Weston, S

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Context. Simultaneous broadband spectral and temporal studies of blazars are an important tool for investigating active galactic nuclei (AGN) jet physics. Aims. We study the spectral evolution between quiescent and flaring periods of 22 radio-loud AGN through multiepoch, quasi-simultaneous broadband spectra. For many of these sources these are the first broadband studies. Methods. We use a Bayesian block analysis of Fermi/LAT light curves to determine time ranges of constant flux for constructing quasi-simultaneous spectral energy distributions (SEDs). The shapes of the resulting 81 SEDs are described by two logarithmic parabolas and a blackbody spectrum where needed. Results. The peak frequencies and luminosities agree well with the blazar sequence for low states with higher luminosity implying lower peak frequencies. This is not true for sources in high states. The γ-ray photon index in Fermi/LAT correlates with the synchrotron peak frequency in low and intermediate states. No correlation is present in high states. The black hole mass cannot be determined from the SEDs. Surprisingly, the thermal excess often found in FSRQs at optical/UV wavelengths can be described by blackbody emission and not an accretion disk spectrum. Conclusions. The so-called harder-when-brighter trend, typically seen in X-ray spectra of flaring blazars, is visible in the blazar sequence. Our results for low and intermediate states, as well as the Compton dominance, are in agreement with previous results. Black hole mass estimates using recently published parameters are in agreement with some of the more direct measurements. For two sources, estimates disagree by more than four orders of magnitude, possibly owing to boosting effects. The shapes of the thermal excess seen predominantly in flat spectrum radio quasars are inconsistent with a direct accretion disk origin.

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  • How Gambling Harms Experienced by Pacific People in New Zealand Amplify When They Are Culture-related

    Kolandai-Matchett, K; Langham, E; Bellringer, M; Ah-Honi Siitia, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Pacific people in New Zealand are a minority ethnic population identified in national prevalence studies as having the highest risk of developing gambling problems. As earlier studies identified some links between culture and gambling for this population, our study aimed to deepen understanding of these links and their role in explaining the disproportionate gambling harms experienced by Pacific people. To achieve this aim we employed intersectionality as a theoretical framework to explore the culture-gambling intersection for this population group. We analysed data from a subset of focus groups conducted for a broad study of gambling harms in New Zealand. The subset was selected based on the presence of individuals knowledgeable about Pacific people’s gambling behaviours, including staff from Pacific problem gambling treatment services who provided examples from a cultural perspective. We identified themes at a latent level via an interpretive process to identify underlying cultural contexts of gambling harms. Findings indicated that whilst harms experienced by Pacific people were similar to those identified amongst the general population, the cultural contexts in which some harms manifested were complex. This paper contributes to the existing knowledge base about gambling harms for Pacific people in relation to six culture-gambling intersecting themes that emerged from the data: collectivism, gift-giving, gambling-based fundraising, patriarchy, beliefs about blessings, and sports celebrities. Findings are discussed in relation to the current knowledge of gambling and conceptualisations of gambling harm within Pacific communities. Implications for culturally appropriate harm minimisation strategies and prevention interventions for this population are suggested.

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  • Teaching the Virtues of Sustainability As Flourishing to Undergraduate Business Students

    Grant, P; McGhee, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Business leaders have a major influence over the achievement of a truly sustainable world; however to do this such leaders need knowledge, which can provide them with convictions that alter both their individual behaviour and their approach to business. Unfortunately in most business schools sustainability is presented as just another strategy for maximising profits. This article describes an undergraduate sustainability course for business students which has transformative potential. Students are exposed to the neo-classical worldview underlying business-as-usual and are challenged to examine what needs to change to reach the goal of sustainability-as-flourishing. More importantly students are helped to draw their own conclusions about the implications of this change for them personally. The uniqueness of this course lies in the fact that students are given the means and tools to action change by introducing them to a virtue ethics framework. This framework provides a blueprint for how individuals can contribute to achieving sustainability as flourishing through the daily practice of virtue and the inspiration of moral exemplars.

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  • Under Pressure: OHS of Vulnerable Workers in the Construction Industry

    Lamm, F; Moore, D; Nagar, S; Rasmussen, E; Sargeant, M

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The New Zealand construction industry provides a good illustration of the changing nature of work and the impact this has had on the occupational health and safety (OHS) of sub-contracted construction workers. In particular, we examine the vulnerability of workers in the context of the construction industry post-2010 Canterbury earthquakes. In doing so, we apply Quinlan and Bohle’s (2004; 2009) ‘Pressures, Disorganization and Regulatory Failure’ (PDR) model to frame the changing nature and organisation of work and the impact this has had on the OHS of sub-contracted construction workers. Finally, we discuss what can be done going forward in terms of creating a more effective regulatory regime and a safer and healthier industry.

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  • Measuring Progress and Projecting Attainment on the Basis of Past Trends of the Health-related Sustainable Development Goals in 188 Countries: An Analysis From the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016

    Feigin, V; GBD 2016 SDG Collaborators

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    No abstract.

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  • Thoughts Become Things: A Grounded Cognition Approach to Imagery Use in the Power Clean

    Lindsay, Riki

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    While it is widely argued that personalised imagery scripts are beneficial to performers, theory and data to support this contention is sparse. The current study aims to address these issues by investigating: Firstly, what differences in content and description arise from the use of generic and personalised scripts aimed at improving performance in the Power Clean (PC). Secondly, if any differences are reflected in relevant kinematic measures. Sixteen resistance trained individuals were randomly allocated to one of two conditions: personalised imagery (PI), or generic imagery (GI). During baseline testing, participants performed a 1 repetition maximum (1RM) PC along with a recall test which consisted of giving a personal description of the power clean. Personal descriptions of the PC were used to construct imagery scripts for the PI group. Scripts for the GI group were derived from a standard description of the PC obtained from an international level Olympic-Weightlifting coach and current literature on PC technique. Participants completed three PC training sessions per week and listened to an audio-recorded version of their given imagery scripts five times per week. At the end of the training period descriptions of the PC were compared along with kinematic and performance variables including; peak power (PP), peak force (PF), peak velocity (PV) at 80, 90 and 100% of the participants’ 1RM and horizontal bar displacement. There was a significant difference between post-test adjectives used between groups (ES=1.37±1.27). The PI group showed a meaningful increase (23.4 ± 7.8 to 31.1 ± 18.1) compared to a decrease in the GI group (14.6 ± 8.7 to 13.6 ± 7.8). At 100% testing load the PI group experienced changes to Dx2 and DxT which saw the bar caught closer to the participants’ centre of mass in post-testing. The PI group showed small to moderate improvements in PF (80 and 90%) and PV (100%). Findings suggest that PI scripts result in different descriptions of movements and that these differences are of benefit to performance.

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