5,786 results for ScholarlyCommons@AUT

  • Acceptance of Using an Ecosystem of Mobile Apps for Use in Diabetes Clinic for Self-Management of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

    Pais, S; Parry, D; Petrova, K; Rowan, J

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Mobile applications (apps) for self-management of diseases such as diabetes and for general well-being, including keeping track of food, diet, and exercise, are widely available. However, consumers face a flood of new mobile apps in the app stores and have no guidance from clinicians about choosing the appropriate app. As much as clinicians would like to support a patient-centered approach and promote health and wellness mobile apps, they may be unable to provide advice due to the lack of comprehensive and reliable app reviews. This research reviewed a selection of health and wellness mobile apps suitable for the self-management of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). A prototype of an ecosystem that integrated the data generated by the apps was built and its usefulness and ease of use were evaluated. The results show that the ecosystem can provide support for GDM self-management by sharing health and wellness data across the diabetes clinic.

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  • “It’s Not the Way We Use English”—Can We Resist the Native Speaker Stranglehold on Academic Publications?

    Strauss, P

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    English dominates the academic publishing world, and this dominance can, and often does, lead to the marginalisation of researchers who are not first-language speakers of English. There are different schools of thought regarding this linguistic domination; one approach is pragmatic. Proponents believe that the best way to empower these researchers in their bid to publish is to assist them to gain mastery of the variety of English most acceptable to prestigious journals. Another perspective, however, is that traditional academic English is not necessarily the best medium for the dissemination of research, and that linguistic compromises need to be made. They contend that the stranglehold that English holds in the publishing world should be resisted. This article explores these different perspectives, and suggests ways in which those of us who do not wield a great deal of influence may yet make a small contribution to the levelling of the linguistic playing field, and pave the way for an English lingua franca that better serves the needs of twenty-first century academics.

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  • Trust-based Adaptive Routing for Smart Grid Systems

    Xiang, M; Bai, Q; Liu, W

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Smart Grid is the trend of next generation electrical power system which makes the power grid intelligent and energy efficient. It requires high level of network reliability to support the two-way communication among electrical services, electrical units such as smart meters, and applications. The wireless mesh network infrastructure can provide redundant routes for the smart grid commu nication network to ensure the network availability. Also due to its high level of flexibility and scalability features that make it become a promising solution for smart grid. However, similar with many other distributed ad-hoc networks, trust is a critical issue for wireless mesh networks. In this paper, we proposed a novel trust-based geographical routing protocol, named as Dynamic Trust Electi ve Geo Routing (DTEGR), which allows peers in a smart grid system to adjust their interaction behaviours based on the trustworthiness of others. The simulation studies have confirmed that DTEGR can achieve better routing performance in different network scenarios, and also to achieve high level of reliable data transmission in smart grid communication networks.

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  • The NZ Social Science Journal System: Characteristics and Visibility

    Crothers, C

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Academic journals are central to the social science knowledge of any society. The set of social science journals sourced in New Zealand or focusing on New Zealand is described in terms of the characteristics of its constituent journals, pointing to ways the system has changed over time. An attempt is made to assess the adequacy of the system as a whole, as well as explaining trends in its development. Without expanding this study considerably it seems possible to draw conclusions that demand for NZ publishing is reasonably balanced with its supply, although there seem to be some areas of considerable supply and a few where there are apparent gaps in coverage. When it comes to the actual operation of journals there may be more strain, with reviewing often requiring many failed attempts before sufficient referees are located. There have been a considerable number of journal ‘failures’ but for the remaining journals their futures seem well-secured, although given the pace of technological developments the longer-term future for the whole of academic publishing seems clouded.

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  • Novel Nutrition Profiling of New Zealanders’ Varied Eating Patterns

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    There is increasing recognition that the relationship between nutrition and health is influenced by complex eating behaviors. The aims of this study were to develop novel nutrition profiles of New Zealanders and to describe the prevalence of these profiles. Observational, cross-sectional data from the Sovereign Wellbeing Index, 2014 was used to develop the profiles in an a-priori process. Descriptive prevalence for the total data (N = 10,012; 4797 males; 18+ years) and profiles were reported. Nutrition question responses were presented as: Includers (consumed few time a week or more), Avoiders (few time a month) and Limiters (not eaten). Fruit or non-starchy vegetables were Included (fruit: 83.4%, 95% confidence interval (CI: 82.7, 84.1); vegetables: 82.6% (81.8, 83.4)) by the majority of the sample. Also Included were confectionary (48.6% 95% CI (47.6, 49.6)) and full sugar drinks (34.3% (33.4, 35.2)). The derived nutrition profiles were: Junk Food (22.4% 95% CI (21.6, 23.3)), Moderator (43.0% (42.1, 44.0)), High-Carbohydrate (23.0% (22.2, 23.8)), Mediterranean (11.1% (10.5, 11.8)), Flexitarian (8.8% (8.2, 9.4)), and Low-Carbohydrate (5.4% (4.9, 5.8)). This study suggests that New Zealanders follow a number of different healthful eating patterns. Future work should consider how these alternate eating patterns impact on public health.

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  • Digital Materiality, Embodied Practices and Fashionable Interactions in the Design of Soft Wearable Technologies

    Joseph, F; Smitheram, M; Cleveland, D; Stephens, C; Fisher, H

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    The emergent field of smart textiles is recognized as an interdisciplinary domain. While each discipline has contributed specific knowledge, an initial focus on technical development has led to an emphasis on function and scientific discourse, ignoring relevant fields like dress and fashion and post-cognitive perspectives that prioritize materiality and embodied experience. As the field continues to develop, different theoretical perspectives are needed to inform new conceptual and methodological approaches to support this expanding, combinatorial field. The notion of embodied interaction, which recognizes the fundamental importance of engaging and re-conceptualizing technology through the experience of the body and its senses is critical to this new agenda. The limitations of technology oriented human-computer interaction (HCI) theories and normative semiotic theories of fashion are considered in relation to the design of soft wearable technologies. Two recent smart garment design projects, that have used embodied interaction approaches are discussed in relation to three theoretical perspectives: firstly from current dress/fashion theory, where notions drawn from new materialism and embodiment theory have led to a reconceptualization of dress as corporeal experience; secondly that of somatics, an approach where knowledge is developed from within the lived experience of the moving body; and thirdly in relation to new material ontologies that address the digital materiality of smart textiles. The theoretical and methodological approaches introduced in the paper and explored through the projects introduce new ideas and approaches that can inform fresh approaches to the design of soft wearable technologies and smart textiles.

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  • Assessing Security Control Framework Impact in the Retail Sector: What Value Can COBIT 5 Add to ITIL Adoption?

    Lal, Vishal

    Masters thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Due to advancements in technology, retailers have gained the ability to reach out to a greater clientele base. Retailers have invested heavily in e-marketing in order to promote themselves to customers who would otherwise be out of reach of a physical retail shop. Online marketing allows retailers to advertise through AdWords, emails ad text messages and general web advertising. The consequence is that retailers have introduced many new IT processes to accommodate customer and business needs. While these developments allow retailers to maximize their earning potential, it also brings about risks such as those to information security, and increasing costs due to not implementing efficient IT processes. In order to maintain competitiveness in the market they need to implement best practices prescribed by industry standards and the use of control frameworks for risk management. Since a business works as a system, various processes tend to be dependent on each other and therefore, it becomes necessary for service level agreements to be in place so that processes are not delayed. Failure to perform one critical task inappropriately could potentially cause a domino like effect on other processes. Unfortunately, not all task performers adhere to procedures and thus negatively impact the overall performance of the business, meaning that the business doesn’t perform as efficiently as it would if processes were performed in accordance to the standards. To combat this issue, IT auditors use different audit tools to assess the efficiency of IT process and determine and recommend ways to improve these processes so that they perform at optimised levels. The purpose of this research is to perform a maturity assessment on three IT processes used in a retail business. These processes are the Security Access Requests, the End of Day Process, and the Campaign Loading Process. The assessment process involves observing research participants performing these processes and then interviewing them to identify the issues that prevented the processes being performed at higher efficiency levels. The research participants were also asked to give each of their respective processes a maturity rating and how in their opinion these ratings could be improved. The maturity ratings were based on the Capability Maturity Model Interface from COBIT 5. The ratings were then analysed based on the observations made and interview responses. The research question is: What Value Can COBIT 5 Add to ITIL Adoption? The findings from the research show that there are many reasons that a process may not be performing at the best efficiency level. Factors contributing to the increase of a capability maturity level measure are: The existence of service level agreements, the intention to follow standard operating procedures, effective training and a commitment to continuous improvement. The absences of any of these are detrimental to business performance as whole. It was also discovered in the research that implementing recommendations for improvements have costs attached to them. These costs can be anything from financial, time consumption, and resources utilisation. The findings show that sometimes processes can be improved by using the services of in-house development teams. They also show that sometimes the best way to improve a process is to simply follow the required steps prescribed for the process. Therefore, the value we are looking at relates to the benefits or gains derived from adopting a control framework. The outcome of this research provides a thorough understanding of using COBIT 5 CMMI to assess the level of maturity attained by various IT processes in the retail sector. It also enables readers to understand the problems faced by process operators that affect the level of efficiency. In addition, it provides a comprehensive understanding of ways in which processes could be improved and to support the businesses objectives. Moreover, it paves the way for research in the same area using more resources and assessment of a greater number of IT processes as well as related areas such as corporate social responsibility from an IT perspective.

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  • Disaster E-Health Framework for Community Resilience

    Norris, A; Gonzalez, J; Martinez, S; Parry, D

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    Disaster management and the health sector ought to be natural allies, but there are few examples of the collaborative planning and application of disaster healthcare involving emergency managers and care practitioners. The different origins, culture, and priorities of the various agencies tasked with disaster healthcare mean that communication and coordination between them is often lacking, leading to delayed, sub-standard, or inappropriate care for disaster victims. The potential of the new e-health technologies, such as the electronic health record, telehealth and mobile health, that are revolutionizing non-disaster healthcare, is also not being realised. These circumstances have led to an international project to develop a disaster e-health framework that can inform national disaster and health strategies. This paper describes this project and its extension to embrace community resilience that strengthens preparedness, safeguards life during the disaster phase, and assists long-term recovery to preserve the health and basic values of citizens.

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  • What Are the Outcomes and Views of People With Mobility Limitations After Participating in a Community Circuit Group?

    Stavric, V; Mudge, S; Robinson, L; Rewa, M

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Increasing services are addressing the needs of people living with long term conditions. The purpose of this observational study was to determine the impact of community circuit classes on balance and mobility of individuals with neurological conditions. Participants were recruited from people interested in or already taking part in circuit classes provided at a private rehabilitation clinic. Outcomes (4-Stage Balance test, 30 Second Chair Stand test and Timed Up and Go (TUG) were assessed before and after a block of circuit classes (at least six weekly sessions). Risk and fear of falling were measured using the Falls Risk Assessment Tool and the Falls Efficacy Scale respectively. Participants completed a self-report questionnaire to provide their views about the class. All 13 participants completed at least six classes. A difference was found in the TUG (p=0.05) but not in other outcome measures. All participants highly rated the organisation, level of staff skill and amount of assistance provided at the classes, but there was less satisfaction on the challenge and frequency of classes. Participating in circuit classes for a short-term period appears to have a positive impact on mobility and is an enjoyable form of exercise for people with neurological conditions.

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  • Educational Makerspaces: Disruptive, Educative or Neither?

    Gilbert, J

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Makerspaces are now common in schools. This idea, which originated outside education, is being advocated as a way to improve student engagement in learning and/or to foster creativity and/or innovation. It is also linked with “future-focused” education and is seen by some as a potentially disruptive force for good in education. This paper evaluates these claims. It looks at the origins of the makerspace concept and at how and why it was taken up by educationists. Via an exploration of the ideas about knowledge, learning and education assumed by its proponents, it assesses makerspace’s general educative potential and its likely contribution to the development of future-focused education. It concludes that the makerspace idea could be usefully disruptive in terms of education’s future development, but that this is unlikely without system-wide cognitive change.

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  • Finite-time Flocking Control of a Swarm of Cucker-smale Agents With Collision Avoidance

    Ma, J; Lai, E

    Conference item
    Auckland University of Technology

    This paper considers the application of finite-time control to a Cucker-Smale flocking model of autonomous agents with collision avoidance. A mathematical expression for the upper bound on the flocking time is derived. Previous results without considering collision avoidance showed that the flocking time decreases as the number of robots in the flock increases, which is counter-intuitive. We showed that, with collision avoidance, the flocking time indeed increases with the flock size. Our mathematical results are verified by computer simulation. Simulation results also show that certain control parameters and noise can be used to reduce the flocking time.

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  • Measuring Adolescents’ Tourism Satisfaction: The Role of Mood and Perceived Parental Style

    Shavanddasht, M; Schanzel, H

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Adolescents have become an attractive market for tourism because they represent a sizeable population segment with an increasing influence on family purchases. There is an urgent need to understand adolescents’ needs, motivations, and role in the tourism industry, particularly the factors that may affect their tourism satisfaction. This study highlights the importance of adolescents’ mood and the style in which they have been parented as under-researched factors affecting young people’s tourism satisfaction. The focus of the study is Ali Sadr cave, a well-known tourist destination for families in Iran. In 2016, questionnaires were distributed to 360 tourists ranging in age from 11 to 18 years. Descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation analysis, and multiple regressions were run on the 354 useable responses. Results showed, firstly, that 60.2% of the respondents had high levels of satisfaction with mean scores above 3.5 for all items. Secondly, the dominant parenting style, as perceived by the adolescents, was authoritative. Finally, there was a significant and positive relationship between authoritative parenting style and positive mood in relation to adolescents’ basic needs satisfaction. Authoritarian parenting style and negative mood had a significant and negative relationship with the satisfaction of all three basic needs, namely autonomy, competence, and relatedness. Permissiveness had a positive relationship with only two of the needs – autonomy and relatedness.

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  • Positioning Critical Reflection within Cooperative Education: A Transactional Model

    Lucas, PR

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Proponents of cooperative and work-integrated education embed critical reflection in their programs to enhance the likelihood of an experience resulting in meaningful learning for students. Theoretically framed guidelines in the literature on how to determine and facilitate critical reflection in practice remains very limited, highlighting the importance of developing ways of improving stakeholders understanding and practice of critical reflection within these complex learning arrangements. Data analysis of a qualitative case study exploring critical reflection in a specific cooperative education context enabled the development and design of a transactional model to illustrate the positioning and functionality of critical reflection. The theoretical underpinnings for this model are derived from John Dewey’s educational writings. To date no published diagrammatic representations have been found to assist with the development and enhancement of our understanding of the complex dynamics and interplay of factors that influence and contribute to the practice of critical reflection, and the consequences of these transactions.

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  • Face-to-face Versus Telephone Delivery of the Green Prescription for Maori and New Zealand Europeans With Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus: Influence on Participation and Health Outcomes

    Williams, MH; Cairns, SP; Simmons, D; Rush, EC

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Aim In Aotearoa/New Zealand, the proportion of Māori who participate in the national Green Prescription lifestyle programme is lower than for New Zealand Europeans. We compared the uptake and effectiveness of two modes of Green Prescription delivery: face-to-face and telephone among both Māori and New Zealand Europeans. Method Sixty-eight Māori and 70 New Zealand Europeans with type-2 diabetes participated in this six-month randomised trial of the two modes of delivery. Recruitment integrated an explicitly Māori culturally sensitive approach. All participants received lifestyle intervention. Anthropometry, blood lipids and glycated haemoglobin were measured before and after the intervention. Results The face-to-face approach (first meeting) yielded 100% uptake into the programme among both Māori and New Zealand Europeans. At six months there were overall reductions in weight (1.8; [95 CI%, 0.6, 2.9kg]), waist circumference (3.7 [2.6, 4.8cm]), and total cholesterol (0.6 [0.3, 0.9mmol/l]) and glycated haemoglobin (3.1 [-0.2, 6.7mmol/mol]). There were no significant differences by mode of delivery, ethnicity or gender. Conclusion The Green Prescription programme resulted in small but clinically favourable improvements in health outcomes for type-2 diabetes patients, regardless of the mode of delivery for both Māori and New Zealand Europeans.

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  • Transnational Tongan Life

    Brown Pulu, T; Pamatatau, R

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    As a branch of migration studies, transnational studies explores how migrants stay connected to the old country by keeping up loyalties to the homeland where they were born and still have kinfolk still living. The trans signifies patriotism for more than one country. Migrants are devoted to places of residence where they work, live and raise families, and also to the places and peoples from which they have permanently moved.

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  • Health-related Quality of Life in Gout in Primary Care: Baseline Findings From a Cohort Study

    Chandratre, P; Mallen, C; Richardson, J; Muller, S; Rome, K; Blagojevic-Bucknall, M; Roddy, E

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Objectives To examine gout-related, comorbid and sociodemographic characteristics associated with generic and disease-specific Health-Related Quality Of Life (HRQOL) in gout. Methods Adults with gout from 20 general practices were mailed a questionnaire containing the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Short-Form-36 Physical Function subscale (PF-10), Gout Impact Scale (GIS), and questions about gout-specific, comorbid and sociodemographic characteristics. Variables associated with HRQOL were examined using multivariable linear regression models. Results 1184 completed questionnaires were received (response 65.9%). Worse generic and gout-specific HRQOL was associated with frequent gout attacks (≥5 attacks PF-10 β=−4.90, HAQ-DI β=0.14, GIS subscales β=8.94 to 33.26), current attack (HAQ-DI β=0.15, GIS β=−1.94 to 18.89), oligo/polyarticular attacks (HAQ-DI β=0.11, GIS β=0.78 to 7.86), body pain (PF-10 β=−10.68, HAQ-DI β=0.29, GIS β=2.61 to 11.89), anxiety (PF-10 β=−1.81, HAQ-DI β=0.06, GIS β=0.38 to 1.70), depression (PF-10 β=−1.98, HAQ-DI β=0.06, GIS 0.42 to 1.47) and alcohol non-consumption (PF-10 β=−16.10, HAQ-DI β=0.45, GIS β=4.94). Gout-specific HRQOL was better in Caucasians than non-Caucasians (GIS β=−13.05,−13.48). Poorer generic HRQOL was associated with diabetes mellitus (PF-10 β=−4.33, HAQ-DI β=0.14), stroke (PF-10 β=−12.21, HAQ-DI β=0.37), renal failure (PF-10 β=−9.43, HAQ-DI β=0.21), myocardial infarction (HAQ-DI β=0.17), female gender (PF-10 β=−17.26, HAQ-DI β=0.43), deprivation (PF-10 β=−7.80, HAQ-DI β=0.19), and body mass index≥35 kg/m2 (PF-10 β=−6.10, HAQ-DI β=0.21). Conclusions HRQOL in gout is impaired by gout-specific, comorbid, and sociodemographic characteristics, highlighting the importance of comorbidity screening and early urate-lowering therapy. Both gout-specific and generic questionnaires identify the impact of disease-specific features on HRQOL but studies focusing on comorbidity should include generic instruments.

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  • Redressing Perspectives: Mediation, Embodiment and Materiality in Digital Fashion and Textiles

    Joseph, F

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Digital technologies have not only introduced different ways of designing and producing textiles and garments and changed their systems of distribution, they have led to new fields of practice and inquiry including digital fashion, wearable technologies, and smart textiles. Bringing together disciplines as diverse as engineering, textile science, health science, design, and materials science, these new interdisciplinary fields have required collaboration and demand new perspectives extending beyond their initial scientific frameworks. While early research was dominated by functional and technical concerns, utilising scientific approaches, the area of smart wearable technologies warrants diverse theoretical and methodological frameworks to better support the development of these particular new forms that combine dress and device, material and digital, bodies and technologies. Curiously, the fields of fashion and dress theory, and of media studies, have been slow to engage with the emerging field of ‘wearables’. Established framings of fashion and dress have tended to focus on systems and symbolism, positioning fashion as an industry that manufactures and sells commodities, or a socio-cultural system of signification that can be ‘decoded’. The field of media studies has focused on culture and communication in relation to media technologies, but has tended to ignore their techno-material conditions. In this essay concepts of mediation, embodiment, and materiality, drawn from areas including media studies, fashion theory, embodied cognition, and new materialism are discussed in relation to digital fashion and smart textiles. These theories introduce new ontological perspectives that help articulate the particularity of these new fields, the ways they contest traditional subject/object relationships, and open up new methodological approaches. Three examples of recent practice-based research projects conducted at the Auckland University of Technology are discussed in relation to these new frameworks and associated design methodologies.

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  • Hydrological Cycle Algorithm for Continuous Optimization Problems

    Wedyan, A; Whalley, J; Narayanan, A

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    A new nature-inspired optimization algorithm called the Hydrological Cycle Algorithm (HCA) is proposed based on the continuous movement of water in nature. In the HCA, a collection of water drops passes through various hydrological water cycle stages, such as flow, evaporation, condensation, and precipitation. Each stage plays an important role in generating solutions and avoiding premature convergence. The HCA shares information by direct and indirect communication among the water drops, which improves solution quality. Similarities and differences between HCA and other water-based algorithms are identified, and the implications of these differences on overall performance are discussed. A new topological representation for problems with a continuous domain is proposed. In proof-of-concept experiments, the HCA is applied on a variety of benchmarked continuous numerical functions. The results were found to be competitive in comparison to a number of other algorithms and validate the effectiveness of HCA. Also demonstrated is the ability of HCA to escape from local optima solutions and converge to global solutions. Thus, HCA provides an alternative approach to tackling various types of multimodal continuous optimization problems as well as an overall framework for water-based particle algorithms in general.

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  • Technical Debt and Agile Software Development Practices and Processes: An Industry Practitioner Survey

    Holvitie, J; Licorish, SA; Spínola, RO; Hyrynsalmi, S; MacDonell, S; Mendes, TS; Buchan, J; Leppänen, V

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Context: Contemporary software development is typically conducted in dynamic, resource-scarce environments that are prone to the accumulation of technical debt. While this general phenomenon is acknowledged, what remains unknown is how technical debt specifically manifests in and affects software processes, and how the software development techniques employed accommodate or mitigate the presence of this debt. Objectives: We sought to draw on practitioner insights and experiences in order to classify the effects of agile method use on technical debt management, given the popularity and perceived success of agile methods. We explore the breadth of practitioners’ knowledge about technical debt; how technical debt is manifested across the software process; and the perceived effects of common agile software development practices and processes on technical debt. In doing so, we address a research gap in technical debt knowledge and provide novel and actionable managerial recommendations. Method: We designed, tested and executed a multi-national survey questionnaire to address our objectives, receiving 184 responses from practitioners in Brazil, Finland, and New Zealand. Results: Our findings indicate that: 1) Practitioners are aware of technical debt, although, there was under utilization of the concept, 2) Technical debt commonly resides in legacy systems, however, concrete instances of technical debt are hard to conceptualize which makes it problematic to manage, 3) Queried agile practices and processes help to reduce technical debt; in particular, techniques that verify and maintain the structure and clarity of implemented artifacts (e.g., Coding standards and Refactoring) positively affect technical debt management. Conclusions: The fact that technical debt instances tend to have characteristics in common means that a systematic approach to its management is feasible. However, notwithstanding the positive effects of some agile practices on technical debt management, competing stakeholders’ interests remain a concern.

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  • The Rationale Behind a Continous Nasal Positive Airway Pressure Machine That Approximates the Nasal Cycle During Sleep

    Journal article
    Auckland University of Technology

    Normal nasal airflow alternates in dominance between the two nostrils with an ultradian rhythm called the “nasal cycle.” The nasal cycle is thought to enable the patent airway to perform the majority of the air-conditioning functions, while the congested side undergoes a period of recovery. Nasal-applied continuous positive airway pressure (n-CPAP) forces air equally up both sides of the nose disrupting the nasal cycle, which could contribute to nasal side-effects, such as nasal dryness, crusting and congestion. The development of a n-CPAP machine, which approximates physiological alternating nasal airflow during sleep, could reduce nasal side effects and improve n-CPAP adherence. A n-CPAP mask would need modification so that air under pressure could be independently directed to and received from each side of the nose. The system would allow for the pre-setting of both the nasal cycle duration time and the degree of airflow partitioning between each naris. A n-CPAP machine that approximates the normal physiological nasal cycle during sleep could reduce the incidence of adverse nasal symptoms and improve sleep quality leading to improved n-CPAP compliance.

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