14,615 results for UC Research Repository

  • Some aspects of child welfare in New Zealand : with special reference to factory legislation and industrial conditions, 1840-1890

    McMillan, Mary Christine (1945)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The children of New Zealand are probably the most fortunate in the world, for from ante-natal clinic to Vocational Guidance Centre the state watches over their welfare. This thesis is an attempt to find in the past the germs of this humanitarian spirit. Its scope was originally intended to extend to 1945, to trace the genesis of the work of the recent apprenticeship commission in the attention paid to children in the two fields of industry and education. It was soon evident, however, that this was too ambitious a project, and instead a short period has been covered – a period all important in determining the course which the colony was to follow. As the scope in time has been reduced, that of the subject matter has been extended. I have found it impossible to deal with the attitude towards children in industry without giving an account of the development of that industry, while the attitude towards education is only part of the spirit which has been shown also in other fields.

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  • A comparison between the early colonisations of New Zealand and America

    Burrows, James Thomas (1935)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In attempting this comparison between the early colonisation of America and New Zealand, only certain outstanding features have been taken, and these of necessity have been treated in a general fashion. Two courses were open in the treatment of material. On the one hand, all the activities of the Thirteen American Colonies and of New Zealand could have been given in detail – a procedure which hardly lent itself to such a work as this. On the other hand, facts of American and New Zealand history as supplied by prominent historians could have been accepted, and nothing but a bare comparison made, all else being taken for granted. I have aimed at steering a middle course, and have tried to give just sufficient detail to supply a background for comparisons between the two countries.

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  • Supporting secondary teacher candidates' teacher development as culturally responsive teachers

    Fickel L; Abbiss, J E (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    In New Zealand, as in many western democracies, the continuing disparity in educational outcomes has resulted in a growing call for changes in teacher preparation to better support culturally diverse learners in ways that are responsive to the particular national and cultural contexts. This paper presents findings from a teacher education program specifically designed to address this national need by preparing new teachers “who are critical pedagogues, action competent and culturally responsive.” Grounded in socio-cultural theory, this practitioner-inquiry examines how the iterative use of a synthesizing framework within the program supports secondary teacher candidates to develop their professional identity as culturally responsive teachers.

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  • Enhancing Educational Outcomes for Alaska Native Students through Networked Inquiry

    Fickel LH (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Search for sterile neutrino mixing using three years of IceCube DeepCore data

    Adams J (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    © 2017 American Physical Society. We present a search for a light sterile neutrino using three years of atmospheric neutrino data from the DeepCore detector in the energy range of approximately 10-60 GeV. DeepCore is the low-energy subarray of the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The standard three-neutrino paradigm can be probed by adding an additional light (Δm412∼1 eV2) sterile neutrino. Sterile neutrinos do not interact through the standard weak interaction and, therefore, cannot be directly detected. However, their mixing with the three active neutrino states leaves an imprint on the standard atmospheric neutrino oscillations for energies below 100 GeV. A search for such mixing via muon neutrino disappearance is presented here. The data are found to be consistent with the standard three-neutrino hypothesis. Therefore, we derive limits on the mixing matrix elements at the level of |Uμ4|2 < 0.11 and |Uτ4|2 < 0.15 (90% C.L.) for the sterile neutrino mass splitting Δm412=1.0 eV2.

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  • Evolution of a Networked Learning Community: Interweaving action-research and programme evaluation to create a PK-20 school-university collaborative partnership for learning and innovation

    Fickel LH; Chesbro P; Tucker S; Boxler N (2011)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The Effect of Area Level Deprivation on Obesity in New Zealand: Analysis of The New Zealand Health Surveys

    Kirk RC; Halim, A; Basu, A (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The importance of community engagement in learning to teach

    Fickel LH; Abbiss J; Brown L; Astall CM (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Teacher Education in indigenous contexts: Critical considerations of teacher educator understandings and decision-making related to treaty issues and social justice

    Stark R; Fickel LH (2015)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Despite the existence of a treaty (Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi, 1840) in Aotearoa New Zealand that promised the indigenous Māori that their language and culture would be protected, these rights to autonomy and self-determination have not been fully realised. The persistent gap in the education system’s responsiveness to Māori educational aspirations and well-being poses a significant social justice challenge to educators, in particular teacher educators. In order to successfully respond to the educational needs of Māori as tangata whenua (the ‘people of the land’ or indigenous peoples of Aotearoa New Zealand) teacher educators must develop the necessary sociocultural knoweldge and culturally-responsive pedagogies to enact the fullness of their professional responsibilities as treaty partners with Māori. By focusing on the indigenous context of teacher education in Aotearoa New Zealand, we seek to illuminate a particular aspect of this complexity as a means to extend and problematise the discourse around international teacher educator knowledge and practice with respect to issues of diversity, culturally responsive practice, and social justice. In undertaking this inquiry, we draw from a larger qualitative investigation examining the perspectives of a small group of teacher educators regarding their understandings of the treaty in relation to their educational practice. Our analysis is informed by critical theory (Giroux, 2007; Kincheloe, 2008) and the notion of ‘teachers as gatekeepers” (Thornton, 1991, p 238).

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  • Humanizing secondary school contexts: learnings from Aotearoa New Zealand and Peru Latin America

    Fickel LH; MacFarlane S; Macfarlane AH; Nieto Angel, Maria Carolina (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Developing initial teacher action competence in working with culturally diverse learners

    Fickel LH; Astall C; Abbiss, J E (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Context of our work: § Teacher Education Reform in Aotearoa New Zealand § New ITE programme-Masters of Teaching and Learning § Action Competence Inquiry Framework: § Theoretical perspectives § Research question § Cultural Tool Critical Lens 1: Preservice Teacher Development of Action Competence Critical Lens 2: Theorizing teacher education practice Conclusion: Contribution to International/European conversation

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  • PLD Facilitated Support to Engage Teachers in Linking Family & Whānau to Classroom Literacy Pedagogy

    Fickel LH; Henderson C; Price G (2016)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In response to the Ministry of Education (MOE) focus on enhancing the provision of Professional Learning and Development (PLD), the Literacy Team Facilitators of the Literacy Language Learning Te Waipounamu team have been engaged in a multiyear process of self-study and inquiry around improving their individual and collective PLD practices. Through this ongoing inquiry, research, and evaluation process the team has identified appreciative inquiry and ‘smart tools’ as “high leverage moves” within their PLD. In this paper, we provide a documentary account of one particular area of the team’s embedded inquiry, namely the use and impact of using the ‘Student Inquiry Protocol’ as a framework for engaging and supporting teachers to make explicit links to family/whānau as part of their literacy pedagogy practices. This protocol is used within the Teacher Inquiry process that underpins the PLD. Through this account we highlight the positive outcomes of this approach for both teachers and students.

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  • Inquiring into PLD Facilitator Practice to Support Culturally Responsive Literacy Pedagogy

    Fickel LH; Henderson C; Price G (2015)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper presents a documentary account of one aspect of the PLD programme being implemented by the Literacy Language Learning Te Waipounamu PLD Team. The Team’s ongoing inquiry, research and evaluation processes identified appreciative inquiry and ‘smart tools’ as “high leverage acts” within the PLD programme. We focus here on a particular ‘slice’ of this ongoing embedded inquiry, namely the use and impact of the “Focus Student Protocol” as a PLD innovation. The protocol is used within the Teaching as Inquiry process that underpins the PLD programme. Through this account we highlight the positive outcomes of this approach for both teachers and students.

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  • Restoration and Loss after Disaster: Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement

    McManus R; Walter T; Claridge L (2018)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focussing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration / re-building. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavour may be grassroots, organised from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

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  • Flexible and Part-time Work Arrangements in the Canterbury Legal Profession : A Report prepared by the University of Canterbury Socio-Legal Research Group for the Canterbury Women’s Legal Association

    Cheer U; Taylor L; Masselot A; Baird N; Powell RL (2017)

    Reports
    University of Canterbury Library

    In 2015 a research team in the School of Law at the University of Canterbury developed a project with the Canterbury Women’s Legal Association to gather information about flexible and part-time work practices in the Canterbury Legal Profession. For the purposes of the project, part-time work is defined as a form of employment which carries fewer hours per week than a full-time job. A flexible work arrangement is defined as an arrangement where an employee benefits from working practices that offer different degrees of structure, regularity and flexibility. Such arrangements may include the ability to choose the start and finishing time of the working day or compressed work weeks. In November 2015 the Canterbury and Westland Branch of the Law Society, on behalf of the project team, invited all qualified lawyers practicing in the Canterbury and Westland area to participate in a short online survey examining flexible and part-time working arrangements. An invitation was also sent to all legal executives working in the same area. One hundred and thirty eight responses were received and over 90% of these were from female lawyers and legal executives. Although lower participation rate by males is reported in other studies focusing on the legal profession, the gender split in the responses in this project was far more pronounced, suggesting a lack of interest by local male lawyers in this issue. Survey participants were either practising lawyers or legal executives, with legal executives making up 21% of the survey cohort. Fifteen percent of the cohort identified as employers. Ninety six percent of the employee cohort was working on a permanent contract of employment. Just under 50% of the employee cohort were working under a flexible or part-time arrangement.

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  • Mediating publicness: An analysis of Pacific audiences’ desire for a sphere of their own in Aotearoa/New Zealand

    Ross T (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This paper suggests that Pacific groups are positioned narrowly in New Zealand publicness, often in ways that run counter to Pacific audiences’ demand for in-depth news and information and public debate. Focus groups held with Pacific audiences at several urban centres in New Zealand found that Pacific news media are a key site of Pacific people’s publicness in New Zealand. Audiences looked to Pacific media (and, interestingly, Māori media) to fulfil their expectations for timely, in-depth and high-quality journalism, and for a space in which their communities could safely discuss issues and enact their citizenship. However, it is clear that more could be done to realise this role, not just on the part of Pacific media producers, but also funders and policy makers whose focus on Pacific media in terms of ethnicity and culture tends to overlook audiences’ demand for in-depth news and debate. This paper concludes that viewing ethnic media within categories of ethnicity or culture (as do funders, scholars and, often, media producers) risks both exaggerating the ‘otherness’ of ethnic minority groups and overlooking Pacific audiences’ media needs in terms of their participation in society. Instead, it suggests, policy-makers and funders could do more to recognise the journalistic and public sphere roles of the Pacific news media they fund.

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  • Virtual Trials of the NICE-SUGAR Protocol: The Impact on Performance of Protocol and Protocol Compliance

    Uyttendaele U; Dickson JL; Shaw GM; Desaive T; Chase JG (2017)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Hypoglycaemia, hyperglycaemia and blood glucose (BG) variability are associated with worsened outcomes in critical care. However, NICE-SUGAR trial showed no clinical benefit from intensive insulin therapy. This study compares the table-based NICE-SUGAR and model-based STAR protocols to assess their relative capability to achieve safe, effective control for all patients. Validated virtual patients (n=443) were used to simulate glycemic outcomes of the NICE-SUGAR and STAR protocols. Key outcomes evaluate tightness and safety of control for all patients: %BG in 80–144 mg/dL range (PTR); Per-Patient Mean BG (PPM_BG); and Incidence of Hypoglycaemia (BG<40 mg/dL). These metrics determine performance overall, for each patient, and safety. Results are assessed for NICE-SUGAR measuring per-protocol (~24/day) and at reported average rate (~3-hourly; ~8/day). STAR measures 1-3-hourly, averaging 12/day. Per-protocol, STAR provided tight control, with higher PTR (90.7% vs. 78.3%) and tighter median [IQR] PPM_BG (112[106-119] vs. 117[106–137] mg/dL), and greater safety from hypoglycaemia (5 (1%) vs. 10 patients (2.5%)) compared to NICE-SUGAR simulations as per protocol. The 5-95th percentile range PPM_BG for NICE-SUGAR (97–185 mg/dL) showed ~5% of NICE-SUGAR patients had mean BG above 180mg/dL matching clinically reported performance. STAR’s 5th-90th PPM_BG percentile range was (97–146 mg/dL). Measuring as recorded clinically, NICE-SUGAR had PTR of 77%, PPM_BG of 122 [110-140] mg/dL and 24(6%) of patients experienced hypoglycaemia. These results match clinically reported values well (mean BG 115 vs. 118 mg/dL clinically vs. simulation, clinically 7% of patients had a hypoglycemic event). Glycaemic control protocols need to be both safe and effective for all patients before potential clinical benefits can be assessed. NICE-SUGAR clinical results do not match results expected from their protocol, and show reduced safety and performance in comparison to STAR.

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  • Possible mechanisms of pollination failure in hybrid carrot seed and implications for industry in a changing climate

    Broussard MA; Mas F; Howlett B; Pattemore D; Tylianakis JM (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    Approximately one-third of our food globally comes from insect-pollinated crops. The dependence on pollinators has been linked to yield instability, which could potentially become worse in a changing climate. Insect-pollinated crops produced via hybrid breeding (20% of fruit and vegetable production globally) are especially at risk as they are even more reliant on pollinators than open-pollinated plants. We already observe a wide range of fruit and seed yields between different cultivars of the same crop species, and it is unknown how existing variation will be affected in a changing climate. In this study, we examined how three hybrid carrot varieties with differential performance in the field responded to three temperature regimes (cooler than the historical average, average, and warmer that the historical average). We tested how temperature affected the plants' ability to set seed (seed set, pollen viability) as well as attract pollinators (nectar composition, floral volatiles). We found that there were significant intrinsic differences in nectar phenolics, pollen viability, and seed set between the carrot varieties, and that higher temperatures did not exaggerate those differences. However, elevated temperature did negatively affect several characteristics relating to the attraction and reward of pollinators (lower volatile production and higher nectar sugar concentration) across all varieties, which may decrease the attractiveness of this already pollinator-limited crop. Given existing predictions of lower pollinator populations in a warmer climate, reduced attractiveness would add yet another challenge to future food production

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  • Centering Language, Culture, and Identity at the Nexus of Professional Learning and Practice

    Henderson, Christine; Price, Gaylene; Fickel, Letitia Hochstrasser (2013)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Extending the Search for Muon Neutrinos Coincident with Gamma-Ray Bursts in IceCube Data

    Adams J (2017)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    © 2017. The American Astronomical Society. All rights reserved.. We present an all-sky search for muon neutrinos produced during the prompt γ-ray emission of 1172 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. The detection of these neutrinos would constitute evidence for ultra-high-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) production in GRBs, as interactions between accelerated protons and the prompt γ-ray field would yield charged pions, which decay to neutrinos. A previously reported search for muon neutrino tracks from northern hemisphere GRBs has been extended to include three additional years of IceCube data. A search for such tracks from southern hemisphere GRBs in five years of IceCube data has been introduced to enhance our sensitivity to the highest energy neutrinos. No significant correlation between neutrino events and observed GRBs is seen in the new data. Combining this result with previous muon neutrino track searches and a search for cascade signature events from all neutrino flavors, we obtain new constraints for single-zone fireball models of GRB neutrino and UHECR production.

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