2,859 results for Unitec Research Bank

  • Engaging with diverse communities : sport as a vehicle for social development

    Walters, Simon; Williams, Vera; Spencer, Kirsten; Farnham, Adrian (2017-12-22T13:30:16Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    Physical activity has the potential to powerfully contribute to individual and community hauora. Through annual trips to the Philippines in 2013-2016 by a team of coaching academics from Unitec and AUT University, we were able to implement several projects aimed at building relationships within communities and enhancing self-esteem and confidence for at-risk youth. The work was underpinned by a sport-for-development (SFD) philosophy (SDP, 2007) and a positive youth development (PYD) approach (Lerner et al., 2005) to use the holistic nature of physical activity and sport to create transformative change within the participants. This work in the Philippines has helped inform aspects of the new Level 5 National Diploma in Sport, Recreation and Exercise that is currently being developed at Unitec. There is demand within New Zealand for both community and youth development learning and there is increasing employment being created in this area. This creates a potential for sport and recreation students to be educated in this line of work – to develop an understanding of sport as a vehicle for personal and social development, alongside developing skills to actually implement this work. The new Unitec diploma will include specific content relating to these holistic outcomes with a strong emphasis on problem and project based learning, linked closely with key industry organisations, in a highly applied manner. There is a particular focus on understanding and working with Māori and Pacific communities and utilising culturally responsive methods to achieve holistic outcomes.

    View record details
  • Adaptive reuse and re purposing of industrial buildings to residential dwellings in Auckland City

    Parris, S.; Kiroff, Lydia (2017-12-22T13:30:20Z)

    Conference paper
    Unitec

    The conversion of former industrial buildings and identifying heritage as a commodity has become a pervasive trend, especially over the last decade. Adaptive re-use of old industrial buildings is often seen as an alternative to demolition and replacement and as the primary development solution for an existing building when it no longer meets expectations. Auckland City has at its disposal existing building stock that can offer significant economic, environmental and social benefits despite the stigma attached that this is both a complicated and costly process. The aim of this paper is to examine the key areas of consideration involved in an industrial to residential conversion project in one of Auckland’ s CBD fringe areas. The study utilises a case study approach that focuses on the Ford Factory Lofts, situated in Parnell. Semi-structured in-depth interviews were carried out with the property developer, architect, structural engineer, planner and marketing manager. Fieldwork and documentary research complemented the interviews with the aim to understand the potential that adaptive reuse has in the context of Auckland City. The findings indicate that for a developer to consider adaptive reuse as a viable alternative to demolition, a clear set of financial incentives must be identified. Although the undertaking was not attractive in terms of cost and risk related to buildability, marketability and the potential for return on investment played an important role and ultimately validated the process, allowing the developer to capitalise on the building’s character. Other drivers, associated with sustainable building practices, were not considered and were instead a bi-product of the adaptive reuse process.

    View record details
  • The New Zealand eFlora : delivering what’s needed in the electronic age to the people of New Zealand

    de Lange, Peter (2017-12-22T13:30:10Z)

    Conference item
    Unitec

    The Flora of New Zealand has been traditionally served to the tax payer through a series of technical hard copy publications. The most recent of these, the New Zealand Flora Series, was initiated in the 1940s with the first volume published in 1961 and the last (as a second edition) in 2010. Although excellent for their time they served as static accounts, often dated when they went to print, and because of this sometimes causing confusion, or in the case of biosecurity matters a false impression of priorities. The move to an eFlora model for New Zealand has been relatively recent, the first treatment - The Hypericaceae was published in 2010. Since then 49 treatments have been published online covering 30 Moss, 16 Pteridophyte and nine flowering plant families (values as of 9 November 2016). In this presentation I explore the eFlora of New Zealand as seen by a major end user - the New Zealand Department of Conservation. * Traditional flora resources * New Zealand Department of Conservation User Needs * What names do we use and why? *Being consistent * New Zealand Threat Classification System (NZTCS) * Biostatus * Use New Zealand Herbarium Network * Consensus Model needed * Linkage to external websites * Other issues *Working with iwi *So where to from here?

    View record details
  • 牛津大学饱蠹楼图书馆所藏十九世纪中国音乐教材述略 (Musical teaching texts in Chinese preserved at the Bodleian’s Library, Oxford University)

    Gong, Hong-Yu (2017-12-21T13:30:56Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    View record details
  • Simulation is not a pedagogy

    Erlam, Gwen; Smythe, L.; Wright-St Clair, V. (2017-12-21T13:30:36Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Simulation as a teaching/learning tool has evolved at an unprecedented pace which some believe has occurred despite a lack of research into pedagogies appropriate to guide this technology-based learning tool. There seems to be some confusion as to what simulation actually is. Some have called simulation a pedagogy, which is incorrect. Simulation is not a pedagogy, but an immersive teaching/learning platform which is a representation of a functioning system or process. Simulation has been used in undergraduate nursing education in a focused manner for nearly 20 years. Its effectiveness in improving clinical reasoning and critical thinking is not certain if overall instructional design principles do not reflect suitable philosophical paradigms. Simulation as a teaching/learning platform is maximized when instructional design includes the inspiration of behaviorism, cognitivism, and constructivism. Behaviorist design principles include rote learning, repetition, modular learning, stimulus-response, and conditioning. Cognitivist design principles include observational techniques, bootstrapping, and equilibration in the form of assimilation and accommodation. Constructivist design principles include new habit formation through experience and interaction with a “mature social medium” in the form of a simulation facilitator. All of these philosophical underpinnings have the potential to maximize simulation when used as underpinnings in the overall design.

    View record details
  • Is there a housing crisis in New Zealand or is it only a metaphor? Results of a critical metaphor analysis

    Romova, Zina; Varley, Steve (2017-12-21T13:30:58Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    This paper reports on a corpus-based study of metaphor use in the discourse of the Auckland housing topic in News and Commentary sections of The New Zealand Herald over the months of July to September 2016, the time of intense debate in the media on the housing situation in Auckland. The paper outlines an approach combining cognitivist and the Critical Metaphor Analysis. The study aims to reveal the persuasive ideological functions of metaphors in the News and Commentary genres and the covert intentions of the writers with particular reference to perceptions of a housing crisis a year before elections in the country. Our findings include a classification of metaphors used in the reporting of and commenting on the housing situation in Auckland based on cognitivist conceptualisation of metaphors, a comparative statistical analysis of the metaphors used in the News and the Commentary genres, and an explanation of the factors that may influence the recipients' decoding of the identified metaphors. We conclude from the analysis of the newspaper texts and the corpora that the metaphorical language used in both these genres promotes the readership's perception of a market in crisis.

    View record details
  • Encountering the pedagogy of live and interactive architectural projects

    Pretty, Annabel; McPherson, Peter (2017-12-21T13:30:24Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    The use of the word “live” as a prefix for a project, is a thought-provoking, and perplexing concept; does one assume that all other projects are dead? Or is it that "(a)live," in the studio build paradigm, is about the currency and value of the moment? Or is it that one is operating outside of normative architectural academia, and is therefore (a)live? Untangling the meta meaning of the verb “live” and then juxtaposing it with the word “interactive” could draw the reader to the conclusion that we are talking about a nonmomentary or continuous two-way transfer of information – often as not between the student, the lecturing staff and external agencies (in many cases real clients). It is this existence between the borderland of academia and practice that this chapter hopes to unpack and clarify.

    View record details
  • Associative design methodology : performative design for a modern work-teach-learn Unitec

    Lukaszewicz, Henry John Witold (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    This research project focuses on displaying the advantages of using the computer as a design tool through the redesign and reuse of a series of five joined buildings, Unitec’s existing buildings 111-115. This divided into two parts: In the first part the question is, how can the advantages of using the computer as a design tool be shown? This is explored by understanding the design method terminologies, discovering what the computer is being used for and how it is being used, and finding out what digital tools are available to implement these methods and processes. The second part covers the reuse of Unitec’s existing buildings 111-115 and updating them through renovation. It reviews Unitec’s needs as an institution essentially as a client to the project (unofficially). It investigates office design and spatial planning as it is identified as a programmatic asset. It reviews the sustainability of materials both as a possible design factor and as sustainability is found to be a key issue for the project. Precedents with building typologies and purposes relevant to the findings of the previous topics are reviewed. The site is predefined by the current location of the buildings and the future plans for Unitec as a campus. It was identified purposely as a good foundation to apply the digital design methodologies to. The site not only is the defined plot of land and its context, but the five joined buildings themselves. The buildings were investigated in their current state of use to identify existing problems that could be resolved and bettered. Physical characteristics of height, structure, and floor area were analysed. The design combines lessons learnt through the research and is informed by Unitec’s needs and the three major driving factors that parallel Unitec’s views which are: flexibility, encouraging interaction, and reducing environmental impact. These ideas are to work in parallel with using the computer as a design tool in a performative associative manner to design a work-learn-teach complex as a reuse through the redesign buildings.

    View record details
  • Streets in the sky : how can architecture extend the public realm into the high-rise?

    Craigie, Harrison (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Urbanisation is inevitably stretching our cities deeper into the ground and higher into the sky. Over the past century, influences of the motor vehicle and the High-Rise form have induced a growing disconnect between dwellers and street life. Although more and more people live in cities, the current High-Rise urban form encourages privatised living. It neglects the pedestrian experience, creates a vertical socio-economic hierarchy, and prompts poor social relations. By integrating pedestrian infrastructure into architecture, growing cities can increase and evenly distribute their public space. Pedways (elevated and subterranean walkways) have been used since at least the 8th - 7th century B.C. However, most of the significant research for this project has come from the past 100 years. Some of these visions have been partially realised in places such as North America and Hong Kong. However, these networks only engage in the lower floors of High-Rises, and often lack the elaborate social intent of the utopian visions. Current networks are constrained by social, political, economic factors. This project critiques previous visions, and investigates more holistic approaches to realising these visions. This project aims to encourage ‘street life’ above and below ground level. It is important to identify the essential elements of ‘a great street’ and to reinterpret these within the High-Rise. The objectives are to enable ’the vertical street’, ’elevated neighbourhoods’, and ‘hybridisation’ throughout the entire building. In doing so, the project strives to remedy social issues resulting from the current High-Rise form. Auckland is an appropriate test site for this topic, as it is in the early stages of dense urban development, and has the current opportunity to integrate pedways into its masterplan - an appropriate response to the accelerating population and the incomplete pedestrian network.

    View record details
  • An investigation of attitudes and underlying beliefs toward low back pain among osteopathy students using the Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ)

    Hilbink, Hester (2018)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain (LBP) is considered one of the most disabling health conditions worldwide. There is overwhelming evidence that psychosocial factors are important risk factors in the development and maintenance of chronic LBP. It appears that healthcare practitioners’ attitudes and beliefs regarding LBP can significantly influence the views of their patients. AIMS: To identify common LBP attitudes and belief orientations of New Zealand osteopathy students. The secondary aim was to investigate psychometric properties of the tool, the Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ) which has had limited prior testing. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted that included basic demographic information, the Health Care Providers’ Pain and Impairment Relationship Scale (HC-PAIRS) and the Back Pain Attitudes Questionnaire (Back-PAQ). Students marked on a Likert scale how strongly they agreed or disagreed with each item in the questionnaire. The convergent validity and internal consistency of the Back-PAQ was also evaluated against the HC-PAIRS. In total 83 students participated in this study. RESULTS: The median Back-PAQ and HC-PAIRS scores for students across all year levels were 6.5 and 46.0 respectively. Median Back-PAQ scores for Year 1 and 2 students were 10.0 and for Year 4 and 5 students’ 17.0. Third year students’ scored 11. Scores for the HC-PAIRS for Year 1 and 2 students were 54.0, Year 3 students scored 50 and for Year 4 and 5 students were 35.0. The Back-PAQ had ‘good’ internal consistency (α= 0.88) and acceptable convergent validity (Pearson’s r = - 0.77, P value <0.001) when measured against the HCPAIRS. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, osteopathy students hold less than optimal attitudes and beliefs about the back, and back pain that are not in line with best practice guidelines. However, the study revealed promising results in that students in their final 2 years of study scored significantly more favourably than Year 1 and 2 students. The new tool Back-PAQ showed promising results for clinical application whereby good internal consistency and acceptable convergent validity were found.

    View record details
  • Putting people first : an architectural approach to improving quality of life to create a safer community in an Auckland suburb

    Patel, Reya (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Crime in Auckland has increased in recent years, and is becoming a more significant problem for Auckland’s residents, as well as for the governmental agencies charged with protecting the peace. While the statistics for some types of crime have been relatively stable for example car theft, burglaries and ‘white-collar crime’, other types of criminal activity including drug related offences, personal violence, and crimes that affect the sense of people in the city and their security indicate trends which suggest that Auckland is becoming a less safe, more unstable urban environment. This may be partly the result of rapid economic and population growth, the development of new neighbourhoods where residents are less well-known to each other, and the changing form of urban societies in terms of more complex social and economic patterns as well as more diversity in urban communities. In this evolving context, it becomes vital to make cities safer places for existing and new residents. This research project critically analyses the principles gathered from the scholarly work of Jane Jacobs, other notable authors as well as the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design techniques which are applied in other countries to reduce crime and their relationship to architecture in New Zealand context. The project also looks at how lower-level crime has an impact on one’s quality of life and wellbeing. A number of different research methodologies are utilised in this study including literature review, precedent studies, site analysis and quantitative research conducted by various organisations across Auckland. The suburb of Henderson is an area in Auckland which has experienced significant levels of crime yet at the same time, facing population growth. The design intervention will be therefore be firstly master planning a site in Henderson using the selected Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design techniques followed by focusing on one part of the site for a mixed-use building design proposition. The project explores and pushes the boundaries surrounding existing building typologies and how appropriately increasing density as proposed by the Auckland Unitary Plan and mixing uses can lead to a safer and more secure environment. Currently, there are no architectural projects that have applied the Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design theories in New Zealand. Although the project has been developed specifically for Henderson, insights from the research and the research approach utilised can be employed in other parts of the country affected by crime and similar circumstances.

    View record details
  • Functional heritage : reconnecting with the iron web

    Howse, William (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    RESEARCH QUESTION : How could an historic building be adapted to facilitate reconnection with its community and to make it functionally relevant in the 21st century? Historic buildings are becoming redundant in the face of contemporary development, although the potential for adaptative reuse is increasing in popularity. Through strategic design intervention, many historic buildings could become functionally relevant during the 21st century. The purpose of this work is to develop an architectural solution for the adaptive reuse of an historic building. The intention is for the building to become functionally relevant in 21st century Dunedin, so the project explores the adaptive reuse in relation to an existing proposal for a new cable-car depot in the city. The project grew from a personal passion for New Zealand’s architectural heritage and, in particular, Dunedin due to its growing reputation as the heritage capital of New Zealand. For this reason it should be acknowledged that the site was selected at the beginning of the project, and all investigation has been conducted specifically in relation to the chosen site. The site in Dunedin that has been chosen is the currently neglected historic former Mornington Cable-Car Depot. A systematic study will be conducted that is based on architectural, historical, and context analysis, to provide insight into the adaptive reuse of a piece of architectural heritage. There has been widespread theoretical views about the adaptation of historic buildings for reuse since discussions on the topic reached their peak in France and England during the nineteenth century. The primary motive behind these discussions seems to stem from issues around authenticity. Should it be allowed for an historic building to be restored to its original condition when much of the building may no longer exist? If restoration is allowed does this result in a fraudulent imitation of the original? This dilemma continues as an on-going argument in heritage conservation. The intention of this work is to refocus how the chosen building is regarded by the community. For example, “it’s an old building past its use-by-date because the cable- car is no longer in existence.” The re-purposing of the building could change the focus to one where the potential of the building is not only realised, but is actually valued and revered for its history, cultural heritage and place in Dunedin society

    View record details
  • The extraction of the cultural identity of Korea, and its contextualization into architecture in New Zealand

    Jang, Samuel (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    RESEARCH QUESTION: How can the Korean community express its cultural identity through architecture in New Zealand? There no longer exists a definitive boundary of vernacularism and a once identifiable characteristics of a certain culture are blurred and modified. Modernism has taken its effect to a superlative level, and in a timeframe of less than a century, the urban fabric of Korea has transformed from a relatively sequestered, but well preserved form of vernacular to an early modernistic [?] ideal envisions. This is however only a proportion of modernist [?] impact on post-war Korea, as it has not only influence what is visible to the eye, but also that which cannot be perceived visually. The fundamentals and assets that determine how and what an identity of Korea is have been almost entirely altered into an uneasy mixture of western repercussion and traditional values. And although this conflict is not specific to Korea, the impingement of this penetration has effectively manipulated everything to a great extent than that of the neighbouring countries such as China and Japan. This phenomenon is even further perplexed by the surge of globalism and human migration into different countries - and this has especially been the case of developed countries. This research project is set out to penetrate through every layer of this hybrid amalgamation which has been overlapped with diverse components during the last century. Extracting components that are entangled within these layers is essential in this process, and is in an attempt to unveil and reimagine cultural identity and reassemble its apparent hierarchy. Having this in context, this research project later brings this derived information and focuses on the Korean community in New Zealand that attempts to its cultural identity through architecture as an immigrant community. Therefore the question of what the identity of Korea is goes one step further and investigates what this means to be in a multicultural context and how the formulated architecture will interact - or counteract - with the existing local culture.

    View record details
  • The landscape of principalship in Yangon, Myanmar

    Aung, Pwint Nee (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    RESEARCH QUESTIONS: 1. What is an international view of principalship? 2. What do documents reveal about the roles and responsibilities of Myanmar principals? 3. How do Myanmar principals perceive and interpret their roles and responsibilities? 4. What challenges do Myanmar principals experience? Next to teachers, principals are the most important factor in improving student learning outcomes. Consequently, it is becoming essential to look at principalship in different national contexts. Very little evidence of credible research exists in relation to principalship in Myanmar (Burma). This study aims to close that gap by investigating what principalship looks like across primary, middle and high schools in one township in Yangon Division in Myanmar containing two primary, three middle and three high schools. In this qualitative study, an interpretive approach was used to investigate the experiences, perceptions and practices of all eight school principals in the township of Yangon, Myanmar. In this qualitative study, an interpretive approach was used to investigate the experiences, perceptions and practices of all eight school principals in the township of Yangon, Myanmar. Two qualitative methods were employed: semistructured interviews, and documentary analysis. Firstly, semi-structured interviews were used to explore how Myanmar principals perceive and interpret their role and responsibilities. Secondly, documentary analysis was undertaken to examine what documents revealed about the role and responsibilities of Myanmar principals.

    View record details
  • The meld

    Bhaumik, Tuhiena (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    RESEARCH QUESTION ‘How can built form create invigorating therapeutic spaces that people and animals can inhabit symbiotically to heal each other? “Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high Where knowledge is free Where the world has not been broken up into fragments By narrow domestic walls” - Rabindranath Tagore Humans are biogenetically programmed to co-exist in harmony with other organic species on the planet, delicately balanced within the cycle. However, over time, we have established ourselves as a pre-dominant species, while assigning subservient roles to other members of the flora and fauna family. Our human environments have gradually become self-destructive while simultaneously disturbing the proportions of nature. This causes us physical discomfort on a daily basis that ultimately results in degenerated bodily health and mental disorders such as depression, stress etc. Although long distanced from our existential habitats of the wild nestled within nature, our Biophilic needs are genetically intrinsic and as important as eating, sleeping, interacting socially etc.; we constantly seek ways to re-immerse ourselves in nature. One such Biophilic bond that has primarily been explored at a small scale is the animal-human bond. A large percentage of species like humans, dogs and horses, have been ‘domesticated’ for many generations, but they still require spaces where they can exhibit their natural behaviours and interact with other members of nature. The key to resolving the daily existential problems of both humans and animals may be this inter-species interaction in an environment where their varied natural affiliations thrive. The design of such spaces would be guided by the knowledge of the physical operations of their bodies – a habitat that rehabilitates the body, enhances mental well-being and rejuvenates the spirit. This inter-species co-existential space would attribute equal importance to all inhabitants, helping to formulate a symbiotic bond through which they learn from one another, develop mutual respect and finally, heal each other. ’

    View record details
  • Ruins for remembrance

    Scott, Jordan (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    There is no other building that signifies what it means to be from Christchurch more than the Christchurch Cathedral. It is the symbol of the city, a unique part of the ambitions and aspirations of the founding fathers and early European settlers. The Cathedral tells the story of Christchurch, it is the heart, soul and centre of the city that is a part of our history in every sense of the word. Six years on from the devastating earthquakes of 2010 and 2011, the Cathedral has lain dormant preciously placed awaiting a decision dividing the city. The fate of Cathedral has shifted between two extremes: - Option A: A complete reinstatement and restoration of the original Cathedral. - Option B: Demolish the remains and build a contemporary replacement Cathedral. When reviewing the two extremes, the reinstatement of this building is a denial of the earthquakes and what the building and city have endured; the replacement and demolition of this building is a denial of its heritage and historical value. The Anglican Synod, the official assembly of the church clergy, voted to reinstate and restore the Cathedral, just weeks before this document was completed. Although this decision has been made, this research project introduces a third alternative, that sees the Christchurch Cathedral as a preserved ruin and transformed into a new civic centre. This scheme is neither restoration nor replacement but instead re-imagines and transforms the remains of the Cathedral through sensitive intervention as a space for the people. Seeking to ‘press pause’ on local social and architectural attitudes towards restoration and replacement, by exploring different design alternatives and future trajectories. Through this alternative, the building’s heritage and historical value are remembered, and the earthquake’s impact on the city is acknowledged.

    View record details
  • The biophilic learning environment : an alternative to the current New Zealand Innovative Learning Environment model

    Rigden, Sarah (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Education in New Zealand is undergoing a sizeable shift towards 21st century innovations; by where child focused flexible learning environments are the new standard. The Christchurch Earthquake of 2011 gave an immense opportunity for the redevelopment of numerous schools; however, the architecture being delivered offers little more than an enclosure to house this new pedagogy within. Nature is an essential aspect of a child’s development and learning, as it is inherent in the human makeup. The environment delivers physical and mental experiences that nothing else can, and separation from the environment is proven to have negative impacts on development, health and well-being. This project addresses the missing link between nature and educational settings in New Zealand. It uses architecture as a mechanism to compose natural experiences in the learning environment to help encourage and facilitate learning. Hence, it proposes an alternate pedagogy: the biophilic learning environment. This biophilic learning environment will be conceptualised through the complete redesign of a Christchurch primary school. The objective is to harmonise architecture with nature, in which nature becomes the educator, the resource, and the content. An experiential journey becomes the lesson, as like the path that curiosity takes us through nature.

    View record details
  • Revisiting the archipelago

    Samson, Therese (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    Throughout the centuries, descendants of formerly colonised peoples continue to face the after-effects of colonialism. In New Zealand, the indigenous Māori people face the highest rate of incarceration. The New Zealand prison system is one of the more punitive ones in the world, with a retributive justice-focused approach. This project aims to work through a more restorative lens, with reference to a body of writers and thinkers that lend thought to this position. This project also evaluates ways in which to heal the gap between marginalised communities and mainstream society. In the Oceanic worldview, water is the entity that does not separate but binds and connects families to their loved ones. Water is not perceived as an obstacle but the surface that brings humans together. With this perspective, an archipelago is imagined for the community’s healing to commence between members of society and various entities. PROJECT BRIEF The project is an intervention for a fragmented community and seeks to create a restorative approach to strengthen social bonds within a community. It re-envisions the archipelago metaphor and breaks through the boundaries of an atomised and segregated society. It seeks to bridge the divide between mainstream and the marginal. *The scheme is part of the Twin Stream Project as connection to the water is a key element.*

    View record details
  • Cultural habitat for the elderly : an aged care facility in a multicultural Fijian society

    Chandra, Shableet (2017)

    Thesis
    Unitec

    RESEARCH QUESTION: How can Fiji’s multicultural traditions inform an architectural response to the needs of elderly citizens living in urban Fijian communities? This research project is a response to concern about a lack of aged care facilities in Fiji. There has been a rise in the numbers of elderly individuals in Fiji, with population growth in the sector associated with healthier lifestyles and advances in medical practice. The increasing numbers of elderly people has a direct impact on existing social welfare and health care policies. Poverty, land lease issues, natural disasters and rising sea levels due to climate change are some of the issues affecting Fijians. These factors have influenced families migrating from rural to urban centres in order to earn a living. This urban drift is also likely to have a negative effect on rural communities especially if elderly people are left behind with no family members to take care of them. This research explores architectural solutions to the problems faced by elderly Fijians living in urban centres by developing alternative living arrangements to house the elderly who require accommodation and care. The research explored existing traditional living arrangements of Fijians in a multi-generational, multicultural and multi-racial society. The architectural technique adapted by contemporary Fijians has also influenced the design outcome. Modern materials and technology were employed to ensure effective use of resources and sustainable design to enhance the comfort of care environment required. To develop the architectural proposition a number of architectural precedents were examined in relation to different care environments. These included a culturally informed designed aged care facility, a multi-generational community designed with the idea of ageing in place, a designed environment specific for a dementia care provisions and a care environment which successfully employed a village typology in New Zealand. Based on these processes an aged care facility was designed for Lautoka city, which both reflects and celebrates the local cultures. It provides communal living in an urban environment, which incorporates the concept of ageing in place. Overall the design proposition offers an example for future developments for aged care facility design in a multicultural Pacific context and represents a major step forward in addressing the lack of appropriate aged care facilities in Fiji.

    View record details
  • Navigation the storm of deteriorating patients : seven scaffolds for simulation design

    Erlam, Gwen; Smythe, L.; Wright-St Clair, V. (2017-12-21T13:30:34Z)

    Journal article
    Unitec

    Recent trends in simulation use have necessitated a more considered approach in the use of this teaching/learning tool. The aim of this research is to discover ways to improve simulation as a teaching/learning platform. Action research was used to answer the question, “How can I improve pedagogical practices with undergraduate nurses in simulation?” This study was implemented at a University in Auckland, New Zealand between November 2012 and March enrolled in the three-year undergraduate bachelor of nursing program. Methods included focus groups, questionnaires, debriefing sessions, pre- and post-tests, and Lasater clinical judgment rubric analysis Seven instructional scaffolds emerged which maximized student learning and retention. These scaffolds: 1) helped move students from known into unknown knowledge; 2) provided situated coaching; 3) modeled expected performance; 4) gave opportunity for improvement; 5) reduced confusion; 6) taught effective communication; and 7) promoted new learning through debriefing. These strategies resulted in a simulation experience which improved clinical reasoning in undergraduate nursing students

    View record details