4 results for Masters Research Projects

  • Moving from Te Po (Night) and into Te Ao (Light): An Indigenous Framework to Support Māori Males Who Have Been Sexually Abused in New Zealand

    Stevens II, Alexander Windsor

    Masters Research Projects thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Sexual abuse is a public health threat to the wellbeing of all people in New Zealand. The costs of sexual violence have been estimated by New Zealand Treasury in 2006 to be over a billion dollars a year. Current statistics suggest that females are more likely to be sexually abused than males. However research has indicated that men (in general) have separate challenges coming forward to discuss being sexually abused. For indigenous males the challenges are even more demanding than tauiwi (non-Māori) men. Excluding ethnicity, male experiences of being sexually abused in general are under reported in New Zealand. This can mean men present with on-going problems that may damage them physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually. When indigenous men access health or social services Māori and Pacific frameworks are often used to ensure culturally appropriate care is given. This can include Te Whare Tapa Wha and Te Wheke. However there are limitations to these indigenous frameworks when sexual abuse is factored in. Given this a new approach is needed to understand the complexities of being sexually abused, and to find culturally appropriate ways forward. Effectively finding solutions that deal with prevention and recovery from sexual abuse will greatly reduce the mental health and addiction burden in New Zealand. To meet the gaps identified the researcher has developed a framework and tool based on ancestral knowledge of both Māori people (the indigenous peoples of New Zealand) and the Ojibwa people (one of the largest groups of indigenous people that are divided between the United States and Canada). The results of the project suggest a positive way forward, towards healing and recovering from sexual abuse. This will be used as the basis for on-going exploration and study.

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  • Spirituality and Religion in Clinical Practice: The Experiences of Psychologists in the Integration of Spirituality and Religion in Therapy in Aotearoa New Zealand

    Lee, Dana

    Masters Research Projects thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    While spiritual and religious beliefs and practices have been found to have positive impacts on wellbeing, many clinicians do not address spiritual and religious issues in therapy, and there is some ambiguity around the practicalities of integrating spirituality and religion in psychological practice. The present study aimed to gain a better understanding of this existing concern and explored the experiences of clinical psychologists in integrating the client’s spirituality and religion into their practice. A thematic analysis of six interviews with clinical psychologists in Aotearoa New Zealand identified themes around techniques, meanings, barriers and the importance of the integration of spirituality and religion in clinical practice. It is hoped that the findings will raise awareness and facilitate changes to training and attitude regarding spirituality and religion in clinical practice.

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  • BDSM and Helpseeking: An Exploratory Qualitative Survey

    Hamer, Walter John

    Masters Research Projects thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Background: Awareness of the subculture of BDSM has grown considerably in recent years, particularly through media and fictional depictions of BDSM. Societal responses to BDSM have ranged from vilifying, to pathologising, to fictional glorifying. Due to the stigmatised nature of BDSM and the prevalence of sadistic abuse in the wider society, the BDSM community has a number of significant barriers to help-seeking, particularly around legal, medical, and therapeutic needs. Objectives: First, exploring how New Zealand BDSM practitioners experience and make sense of help-seeking, including the barriers and benefits of doing so. Second, based on this, informing the BDSM community and helping professions on guidelines around help-seeking with this niche population. Methods: Online qualitative survey, using thematic analysis to construct an interpretive description of the results. Results: Three themes were constructed from the data. The first theme is how BDSM practitioners engage with the dominance of helpers, including use or avoidance of negotiation, limit setting, and aftercare. The second theme covers three distinct patterns of appropriation of BDSM by outsiders, from dominant societal groups, from predators, and from the medical and psychological community. In response to this appropriation, a range of resistance techniques used by the BDSM community are discussed. The final theme is the interpretation of consent as technology. This technology takes skill to be used, and is a tool to aid protection from abuse as well as enabling valued interactions. Conclusions: This research supports the need for helping professionals to have cultural competence when working with this niche population. The cultural resources held by the BDSM community can be a valuable asset in improving help-seeking for BDSM practitioners, and improving the professional helping environment in general.

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  • Energy management system for solar energy on a hybrid bus

    Gao, Shengyu

    Masters Research Projects thesis
    Auckland University of Technology

    Because the solar is eco-friendly and the hybrid vehicles have high efficiency, using solar energy in hybrid vehicles, which are urban buses in this project, could obtain both economy and environment benefits. Determine the parameters of the hybrid bus and calculate the required power. These power and solar energy data are analysed to verify the feasibility of the project. Due to the features of the hybrid bus and solar energy, a special power management system is designed following some control strategy. The system is also verified to be effective and reliable by the simulation results.

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