4,866 results for All rights reserved, 2012

  • Submission to the Health Committee Inquiry into Preventing Child Abuse and Improving Children's Health Outcomes

    Small DT (2012)

    Unclassified
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • CYMRC 8th data Report (2007-2011)

    McDonald, GK; Healey, MD; Hii, J; Szymanska, KE; Anderson, AJ (2012)

    Report
    University of Otago

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  • Collaboration in the process of legislative lobbying: A study of a disabled peoples organisation lobbying for change in New Zealand 1989-1993

    Ruane, Nicholas (2012)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This thesis examines lobbying from the disabled people’s organisation Disabled Persons Assembly (DPA) NZ from 1989 until 1993. It explores how the organisation conducted lobbying activities with respect to two pieces of New Zealand legislation with constitutional significance: The New Zealand Bill of Rights Act 1990 and the Human Rights Act 1993. This thesis places the plight of minority groups within the political process squarely under the research microscope and asks: what factors explain the different outcomes to the DPA’s lobbying efforts to the Bill of Rights in 1990 and the Human Rights Act in 1993? More specifically it examines the DPA’s decision to collaborate with the New Zealand Aids Foundation (AF) during the 1993 Human Rights Act campaign. Collaboration with the AF was a controversial decision that resulted in heated discussions within DPA. Some members were concerned about the political risks of aligning with the AF. DPA leadership however saw a possibility for broad human rights legislation, and took the decision to collaborate. They were convinced that collaboration would bring benefits in the form of greater resources, access to Parliament and better relationships with the media which would all lead to an enhanced capacity to make the case to the public. The thesis argues that by working with the AF, DPA was able to change its lobbying narrative from one solely focussed upon disability rights to one that broadened out to broader human rights protections. DPA was not positioning itself as a minority group arguing for narrow exceptions to existing legislation, a tactic it had pursued in previous campaigns. The campaign proved successful, gaining support from MP’s, as the Human Rights Act was perceived to have public support. The thesis also shows that to understand DPA’s successful strategy it needs to be seen in the context of a failed effort from a previous campaign. DPA’s campaign to lobby for the 1993 Human Rights Act began from the point of an unsuccessful fight to have disability rights included in the 1990 Bill of Rights. DPA was, in effect, ‘locked in’ to fighting the 1993 campaign from that point.

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  • Crossroads: commemorative names in East Berlin, 1990–2010

    Vogel, Gary (2012)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    The memorial landscape has been a focal point in recent studies concentrating on postsocialist Central and Eastern Europe. This thesis contributes to this field by examining the names, naming, and renaming of former German Democratic Republic (GDR) streets, squares, and parks in East Berlin between 1990 and 2010. Political aspirations to influence Germany’s national memory and identity have been overtly present in the alteration of East Berlin’s memorial landscape. Contrasting narratives in the cityscape emerged as each political party –Christian Democratic Union (CDU), Party of Democratic Socialism (PDS), and the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD)– assumed authority in the process of naming and renaming. While the political parties had overt control in the process, these debates over commemorative names was also taken up by and affected the lives of ordinary citizens. This thesis applies Owen Dwyer and Derek Alderman’s holistic approach to reading Mitte and Prenzlauer Berg’s landscape to analyse how inherited socialist dedications were re-interpreted (text), debated (arena), and protested (performance). A number of case studies in two East Berlin districts, Mitte and Prenzlauer Berg, highlight the competing versions of the past that emerged after the demise of the GDR. Mitte became a locus of contention in the battle over commemorative naming because the district was the political centre of a new German democracy. Prenzlauer Berg, a neighbouring district of Mitte, underwent similar disputes over its inherited GDR commemorative names but had very different outcomes. The aim of such a comparative study is to exemplify the power struggles surrounding commemorative names and how political parties and ordinary citizens use them to claim the right to retell the past.

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  • Ethical beginnings: Reflexive questioning in child sexuality research

    Flanagan, Paul (2012)

    Conference item
    University of Waikato

    This paper presents my experience of taking up an area from counselling practice into research practice, and exploring a range of ethical questions. This section describes movement from identity as a counselling practitioner to a researcher identity, specifically noticing moments in which reflexivity in the practice of research have connections to experiences o f reflexivity in the practice of counselling. I explain the process of preparing and submitting my doctoral ethics application for approval and feedback. My application noted that, within this area of practice and research, this is a sensitive topic with potentially vulnerable participants, awareness of my positioning as a male researcher. A foundational value for me in this work has been an ethic of social justice, and a principle that research holds purpose in informing and developing counselling practice. Production of knowledge within this context of sensitive research calls upon a relational ethic of care (ref?) for participants' and researcher's potential vulnerabilities.

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  • On the Geo-Indicativeness of Non-Georeferenced Text

    Adams BT; Janowicz K (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    Geographic location is a key component for information retrieval on the Web, recommendation systems in mobile computing and social networks, and place-based integration on the Linked Data cloud. Previous work has addressed how to estimate locations by named entity recognition, from images, and via structured data. In this paper, we estimate geographic regions from unstructured, non geo-referenced text by computing a probability distribution over the Earth’s surface. Our methodology combines natural language processing, geostatistics, and a data-driven bottom-up semantics. We illustrate its potential for mapping geographic regions from non geo-referenced text.

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  • Frankenplace: An Application for Similarity-Based Place Search

    Adams BT; McKenzie G (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Published
    University of Canterbury Library

    When experiencing or describing a new place people will often compare it against other places that they already know. However, this human attention to the simultaneous similarities and differences between places is not reflected in the design of user interfaces of current place search technologies. In this demo, we present Frankenplace, an application for doing similarity-based place search that allows users to interactively find new places based on mixtures of features drawn from different places. The features of places are derived from a combination of authoritative data sources and unstructured observation data from social media, and organized into an extensible set of layers. We demonstrate the Frankenplace interface, which lets a user build a profile of a target place by selecting the most relevant of the properties shared by known places.

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  • Response: Social work, science, social impact: Crafting an integrative conversation

    Nurius, SP; Kemp, Susan (2012-09-01)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Shifts in the ways that science is being undertaken and marshaled toward social change argue for a new kind of professional competence. Taking the view that the science of social work is centrally about the relationship of research to social impact, the authors extend Fong???s focus on transdisciplinary and translational approaches to science, illustrating ways that national and international priorities are exerting enormous influence in structures for and expectations of science relevant to social work. The authors also emphasize the growing centrality of transformational research, focusing in particular on the interdependence of education and impact. The intent is to stimulate reflectiveness regarding social work???s preparedness to support and indeed amplify a robust culture of high impact science, including more confident, clearly articulated roles and skills in this contemporary scientific landscape.

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  • The observational roots of reference of the semantic web

    Scheider S; Janowicz K; Adams BT (2012)

    Discussion / Working Papers
    University of Canterbury Library

    Shared reference is an essential aspect of meaning. It is also indispensable for the semantic web, since it enables to weave the global graph, i.e., it allows different users to contribute to an identical referent. For example, an essential kind of referent is a geographic place, to which users may contribute observations. We argue for a human-centric, operational approach towards reference, based on respective human competences. These competences encompass perceptual, cognitive as well as technical ones, and together they allow humans to inter-subjectively refer to a phenomenon in their environment. The technology stack of the semantic web should be extended by such operations. This would allow establishing new kinds of observation-based reference systems that help constrain and integrate the semantic web bottom-up.

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  • Enhancing Educational Outcomes for Alaska Native Students through Networked Inquiry

    Fickel LH (2012)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • When to Start, What to Start and Other Treatment Controversies in Pediatric HIV Infection

    Turkova, A; Webb, Rachel; Lyall, H (2012-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Over the last decade there have been dramatic changes in the management of pediatric HIV infection. Whilst observational studies and several randomized control trials (RCTs) have addressed some questions about when to start antiretroviral therapy (ART) in children and what antiretrovirals to start, many others remain unanswered. In infants, early initiation of ART greatly reduces mortality and disease progression. Treatment guidelines now recommend ART in all infants younger than 1 or 2 years of age depending on geographical setting. In children >1 year of age, US, European (Paediatric European Network for Treatment of AIDS; PENTA) and WHO guidelines differ and debate is ongoing. Recent data from an RCT in Thailand in children with moderate immune suppression indicate that it is safe to monitor asymptomatic children closely without initiating ART, although earlier treatment was associated with improved growth. Untreated HIV progression in children aged over 5 years is similar to that in adults, and traditionally adult treatment thresholds are applied. Recent adult observational and modeling studies showed a survival advantage and reduction of age-associated complications with early treatment. The current US guidelines have lowered CD4+ cell count thresholds for ART initiation for children aged >5 years to 500 cells/mm3. Co-infections influence the choice of drugs and the timing of starting ART. Drug interactions, overlapping toxicities and adherence problems secondary to increased pill burden are important issues. Rapid changes in the pharmacokinetics of antiretrovirals in the first years of life, limited pharmacokinetic data in children and genetic variation in metabolism of many antiretrovirals make correct dosing difficult. Adherence should always be addressed prior to starting ART or switching regimens. The initial ART regimen depends on previous exposure, including perinatal administration for prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT), adherence, co-infections, drug availability and licensing. A European cohort study in infants indicated that treatment with four drugs produced superior virologic suppression and immune recovery. Protease inhibitor (PI)-based ART has the advantage of a high barrier to viral resistance. A recent RCT conducted in several African countries showed PI-based ART to be advantageous in children aged <3 years compared with nevirapine-based ART irrespective of previous nevirapine exposure. Another trial in older children from resource rich settings showed both regimens were equally effective. Treatment interruption remains a controversial issue in children, but one study in Europe demonstrated no short-term detrimental effects. ART in children is a rapidly evolving area with many new antiretrovirals being developed and undergoing trials. The aim of ART has shifted from avoiding mortality and morbidity to achieving a normal life expectancy and quality of life, minimizing toxicities and preventing early cancers and age-related illnesses.

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  • K-means clustering pre-analysis for fault diagnosis in an aluminium smelting process

    Aini Abd Majid, N; Young, Brent; Taylor, Mark; Chen, John (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    Developing a fault detection and diagnosis system of complex processes usually involve large volumes of highly correlated data. In the complex aluminium smelting process, there are difficulties in isolating historical data into different classes of faults for developing a fault diagnostic model. This paper presents a new application of using a data mining tool, k-means clustering in order to determine precisely how data corresponds to different classes of faults in the aluminium smelting process. The results of applying the clustering technique on real data sets show that the boundary of each class of faults can be identified. This means the faulty data can be isolated accurately to enable for the development of a fault diagnostic model that can diagnose faults effectively.

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  • Characterisation of soybean oil droplets formed by the breakup of a laminar capillary liquid jet

    Hoh, ST; Farid, Mohammed; Chen, John (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    This work is an effort to model the gas-liquid droplet transesterification reaction to produce biodiesel, specifically to determine the hydrodynamic properties of soybean oil droplets produced by the liquid jet instability method as a model to the droplets produced in the spray reactor of Behzadi and Farid (2009), thus enabling the calculation of mass transfer coefficients. Soybean oil, chosen for this work because it is a typical vegetable oil used for biodiesel manufacture, is heated in a pressure tank and driven through a 0.34 mm diameter orifice using compressed air to produce a capillary liquid jet. The velocity of the emerging liquid jet was calibrated against driving pressures (gauge) between 41.4 to 137.9 kPa. Oil temperatures used were 80, 90 and 100oC. It was found that the liquid jet travels at speeds of 6.2 to 16.2 m/s depending on the driving pressure, with corresponding Reynolds numbers of 280 to 1670, and breaks up into a stream of droplets between 7.6 to 12.0 cm from the orifice opening. The manner in which the laminar jet breaks up into droplets, namely the breakup regime, droplet diameter and breakup length, was examined and observed through high-speed photography. In addition, the effect of having a source of external vibration (20 to 40 Hz) to the liquid jet breakup was also examined.

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  • Process integration in pulp and paper mills for energy and water reduction - A review

    Atkins, Martin John; Walmsley, Michael R.W.; Morrison, Andrew S.; Neale, James R. (2012)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Process integration (including pinch analysis) is a holistic or systems approach to process design and optimisation, which considers the interactions and interdependences between individual unit operations or process elements. Large reductions in both energy and water use in pulp and paper mills has been demonstrated using process integration techniques. A review of the current process integration techniques for energy and water reduction, with a focus on application to the pulp and paper industry is presented in this paper. The concurrent application of heat integration and water/mass integration analysis is discussed. Particular focus is given to published case studies. The integration of biorefineries into existing mills and the energy and water use implications is also receiving much attention and this development is also reviewed.

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  • OpenSolver - An open source add-in to solve linear and integer progammes in Excel

    Mason, Andrew (2012)

    Conference item
    The University of Auckland Library

    OpenSolver is an open source Excel add-in that allows spreadsheet users to solve their LP/IP models using the COIN-OR CBC solver. OpenSolver is largely compatible with the built-in Excel Solver, allowing most existing LP and IP models to be solved without change. However, OpenSolver has none of the size limitations found in Solver, and thus can solve larger models. Further, the CBC solver is often faster than the built-in Solver, and OpenSolver provides novel model construction and on-sheet visualisation capabilities. This paper describes Open- Solver???s development and features. OpenSolver can be downloaded free of charge at http://www.opensolver.org.

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  • International comparison of long term care resident dependency across four countries (1998-2009): A descriptive study

    Boyd, Michal; Bowman, C; Broad, Joanna; Connolly, Martin (2012-12)

    Journal article
    The University of Auckland Library

    Aim:??? To describe an international comparison of dependency of long-term care residents. Methods:??? All Auckland aged care residents were surveyed in 1998 and 2008 using the ???Long-Term Care in Auckland??? instrument. A large provider of residential aged care, Bupa-UK, performed a similar but separate functional survey in 2003, again in 2006 (including UK Residential Nursing Home Association facilities), and in 2009 which included Bupa facilities in Spain, New Zealand and Australia. The survey questionnaires were reconciled and functional impairment rates compared. Results:??? Of almost 90 000 residents, prevalence of dependent mobility ranged from 27 to 47%; chronic confusion, 46 to 75%; and double incontinence, 29 to 49%. Continence trends over time were mixed, chronic confusion increased, and challenging behaviour decreased. Conclusion:??? Overall functional dependency for residents is high and comparable internationally. Available trends over time indicate increasing resident dependency signifying care required for this population is considerable and possibly increasing.

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  • A Sequential Steady-State Detection Method for Quantitative Discrete-Event Simulation

    Freeth, Adam (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In quantitative discrete-event simulation, the initial transient phase can cause bias in the estimation of steady-state performance measures. Methods for detecting and truncating this phase make calculating accurate estimates from the truncated sample possible, but no methods proposed in the literature have proved to work universally in the sequential online analysis of output data during simulation. This report proposes a new automated truncation method based on the convergence of the cumulative mean to its steady-state value. The method uses forecasting techniques to determine this convergence, returning a truncation point when the cumulative mean time-series becomes sufficiently horizontal and flat. Values for the method’s parameters are found that adequately truncate initialisation bias for a range of simulation models. The new method is compared with the sequential MSER-5 method, and shows to detect the onset of steady-state more effectively and consistently for almost all simulation models that are tested. This rule thus appears to be a good candidate as a robust sequential truncation method and for implementation in sequential simulation research packages such as Akaroa2.

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  • Creating and Evaluating Problem Templates for Problem Generation Within the Context of Stroke Cognitive Rehabilitation

    Ogden, Scott (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Stroke Rehabilitation would be more effective if the patients conducted activities personalised to them, as opposed to a set of generic activities which may be irrelevant. This project has the intention of creating problem templates, which will be able to describe the conditions that must be met for a stroke patient to complete an activity, for a wide range of personalised activities. The project is part of the larger Stroke Rehabilitation System, which the ICTG lab is working on. This customisation of treatment is the motivation for the project. The concept of problem templates is used extensively in this project. Problem templates are “chunks of domain-specific knowledge, compiled mentally by experts, and used to solve commonly occurring problems in a particular domain” [1]. Because of their dynamic nature, it is possible to create very generalised problem templates, which can be applied to create very specific scenarios. This research aims to create many of these templates, with the intent of showing that it is possible to create a varied set of potential problem scenarios, using only a few problem templates for each task. After completing background research, a system for developing these problem templates was developed, and six such problem templates created. The six problem templates were for everyday tasks that stroke patients might perform, such as ‘make hot drink’, ‘make frozen meal’, and ‘make sandwich’. A quick survey rendered a number of specific examples to instantiate the problem templates, such as: ‘make coffee’, ‘make pizza’ and ‘make tuna salad sandwich’. From preliminary examination of these problem scenarios, it would appear that these problem templates can be used to generate problem scenarios, in well-defined situations. For the majority of the specific examples, the resultant dependency graphs of states were the correct solution, or required only minor changes. The Author suggests that further problem templates should be made and that further studies be conducted so as to maximise its effectiveness for the Stroke Rehabilitation Project in the long term.

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  • A Sequential Steady-State Detection Method for Quantitative Discrete-Event Simulation

    Freeth, Adam (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    In quantitative discrete-event simulation, the initial transient phase can cause bias in the estimation of steady-state performance measures. Methods for detecting and truncating this phase make calculating accurate estimates from the truncated sample possible, but no methods proposed in the literature have proved to work universally in the sequential online analysis of output data during simulation. This report proposes a new automated truncation method based on the convergence of the cumulative mean to its steady-state value. The method uses forecasting techniques to determine this convergence, returning a truncation point when the cumulative mean time-series becomes sufficiently horizontal and flat. Values for the method’s parameters are found that adequately truncate initialisation bias for a range of simulation models. The new method is compared with the sequential MSER-5 method, and shows to detect the onset of steady-state more effectively and consistently for almost all simulation models that are tested. This rule thus appears to be a good candidate as a robust sequential truncation method and for implementation in sequential simulation research packages such as Akaroa2.

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  • Fast Automated Estimation of Variance in Discrete Quantitative Stochastic Simulation

    Shaw, Nelson (2012)

    Doctoral thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Quantitative stochastic simulation is an important tool in assessing the performance of complex dynamic systems such as modern communication networks. Because of the proliferation of computers and devices that use and rely on networks such as the internet, assessing the performance of these networks is important to ensure future reliability and service. The current methodology for the analysis of output data from stochastic simulation is focused mainly on the estimation of means. Research on variance estimation focuses mainly on the estimation of the variance of the mean, as this is used to construct confidence intervals for the estimated mean values. To date, there has been little research on the estimation of variance of auto correlated data, such as those collected during steady-state stochastic simulation. This research investigates different methodologies for estimation of variance of terminating and steady-state simulation. Results from the research are implemented in the simulation tool Akaroa2.

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