4,791 results for All rights reserved, 2016

  • Unfreezing change as three steps: Rethinking Kurt Lewin’s legacy for change management

    Bridgman, T. (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Kurt Lewin’s ‘changing as three steps’ (unfreezingchangingrefreezing) is regarded by many as the classic or fundamental approach to managing change. Lewin has been criticized by scholars for over-simplifying the change process and has been defended by others against such charges. However, what has remained unquestioned is the model’s foundational significance. It is sometimes traced (if it is traced at all) to the first article ever published in Human Relations. Based on a comparison of what Lewin wrote about changing as three steps with how this is presented in later works, we argue that he never developed such a model and it took form after his death. We investigate how and why ‘changing as three steps’ came to be understood as the foundation of the fledgling subfield of change management and to influence change theory and practice to this day, and how questioning this supposed foundation can encourage innovation.

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  • Aura of the Past: The Rehabilitation of ‘Puhipuhi Mercury Mine’

    Jackson, Nicola (2016)

    Masters thesis
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Through the development of the case site ‘Puhipuhi Mercury Mines’ this design led thesis presents the fusion of ruins with new design, aiming to rehabilitate the site and its history. The delicate nature of the site’s past and its remaining relics present the potential to curate a history. The method of integrating old and new design to reestablish value is explored. Puhipuhi mine has a negative reputation today. Documented memories focus on the mine's industrial downfall and remaining areas of contamination. This has dampened its prospects. The case site has remained dormant since its closure in 1945 (Butcher). With political controversy surrounding the site, and with natural growth dominating the remains, it has become virtually inaccessible. The challenge presented by the characteristics of the site poses the following research question: ‘How can the fusion of old and new architecture add value to a forgotten and contaminated historic site as a means to preserve its history and rehabilitate it for current day use?’ Abandoned elements which lay dormant in our landscape have the opportunity to be valued as iconic elements in New Zealand's history, yet we are hesitant to seek appreciation for the narratives of their past and as a result we are presented with the possibility of historic loss. The site's processing plant presents a need to preserve its architectural heritage and document its history as a means to re mediate the damage of contamination and the devalue that has generated since the closure of the program. Attention is needed to establish it as the beautiful landscape, intriguing remains and educational opportunity that it has the potential to become. Through the establishment of age, historic and use values, new programmes are constructed: a toxicity museum and laboratory.

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  • The Limits and possibilities of history: How a wider, deeper and more engaged understanding of business history can foster innovative thinking.

    Bridgman, T. (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Calls for greater diversity in management research, education and practice have increased in recent years, driven by a sense of fairness and ethical responsibility, but also because research shows that greater diversity of inputs into management processes can lead to greater innovation. But how can greater diversity of thought be encouraged when educating management students, beyond the advocacy of affirmative action and relating the research on the link between multiplicity and creativity? One way is to think again about how we introduce the subject. Introductory textbooks often begin by relaying the history of management. What is presented is a very limited mono-cultural and linear view of how management emerged. This article highlights the limits this view outlines for initiates in contrast to the histories of other comparable fields (medicine and architecture), and discusses how a wider, deeper and more engaged understanding of history can foster thinking differently.

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  • The nature of experience and learning for Japanese girls in a high school basketball club

    Light RL; Yasaki W (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article draws on a study that inquires into what keeps girls aged 13-16 years in a high school basketball club in Japan with a focus on how the nature of their experience is shaped by socio-cultural and institutional context. The influence of context is of particular importance in small-scale, close-focus studies such as the study drawn on in this article and is emphasized due to the way in which the context is culturally distinct from Western settings. While the findings support those of some other studies on adolescent girls participation in sport they identify the influence of the institutional culture of schools and bukatsudō (clubs). Located within the larger Japanese cultural context on the nature of experience in school basketball and the learning emerging from it to identify the implicit yet powerful influence of the cultural learning that underpins Japanese education.

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  • Seeing and being seen as a management learning and education scholar: Rejoinder to ‘Identifying Research Topic Development in Business and Management Education Research Using Legitimation Code Theory’

    Bridgman, T. (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    We greatly appreciate the editors’ invitation to respond to Arbaugh et al’s (2016) thought-provoking article about the current state of business and management education (BME) research. As incoming and current co-editors of Management Learning, it is an excellent opportunity to contribute to a discussion about how we in the management learning and education community see ourselves and want to be seen by others, both within the academy and beyond.

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  • Re-stating the case: How revisiting the development of the case method can help us think differently about the future of the business school

    Bridgman, T. (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    Whilst supportive of calls for business schools to learn the lessons of history in order to address contemporary challenges about their legitimacy and impact, this article argues that our ability to learn is limited by the histories we have created. Through contrasting the contested development of the case method of teaching at Harvard Business School, and the conventional history of its rise, we argue that this history, which promotes a smooth linear evolution, works against reconceptualizing the role of the business school. To illustrate this, we develop a ‘counter-history’ of the case method: one which reveals a contested and circuitous path of development and discuss how recognizing this would encourage us to think differently. This counter-history provides a means of stimulating debate and innovative thinking about how business schools can address their legitimacy challenges, and, in doing so, have a more positive impact on society.

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  • What does quantum mechanics have to do with biomolecular interactions?

    Crittenden DL (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Quantum why? - All the ways we think about how molecules interact are fundamentally determined by how electrons behave - And of course that influences how atoms move/rearrange - We can predict how electrons behave by solving* the electronic Schrödinger equation * approximately

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  • The No. 8 baling wire approach to quantum chemical modelling

    Crittenden DL (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

    Overview: - Our job as chemists is to understand and manipulate the behaviour of electrons within molecules ; - This has a knock-on effect for nuclei – influencing structure, dynamics and reactivity ; - What can and can’t existing quantum models do? ; - What new tools are needed?

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  • The right tool for the right job: Adventures around the Pople table

    Crittenden DL (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • Taking subjectivity and reflexivity seriously: Implications of social constructionism for researching volunteer motivation

    Bridgman, T. (2016)

    Scholarly text
    Victoria University of Wellington

    This paper explores the contributions a social constructionist paradigm can make to researching volunteer motivation, by reflecting on an active membership study of volunteer netball coaches at a New Zealand high school. Social constructionism is based on philosophical assumptions which differ from those of positivism and post-positivism, the dominant paradigms for understanding and representing volunteer motivation. It highlights the social processes through which people give meaning to their motives and views researchers as necessarily implicated in this meaning-making process. Through a critique of the extant literature on volunteer motivation and an illustration of the insights of social constructionism from our empirical study, we consider how our research could be different if we took subjectivity and reflexivity more seriously.

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  • A usability comparison of canvas, topographic and street base maps.

    McPherson, Rory Ivan (2016)

    Masters thesis
    University of Canterbury Library

    Basemaps are a fundamental component of most maps, and may affect the usability of the map. Cartographic guidelines recommend that map authors select a basemap appropriate for the map’s intended topic, scale, purpose, context of use and audience. Guidelines for selecting the basemap, however, are not well covered by the usability literature. Basemap usability research may determine how different basemaps affect the map’s usability. In turn, recommendations may be offered to map authors for selecting an optimal basemap type for the map, and the map user(s). In turn, the usability of the map may improve, as well as the users’ experience. This study presents a usability comparison of canvas, topographic and street basemaps. An online survey was designed to evaluate basemap usability. Survey respondents’ map reading abilities, and subjective preferences, were compared between each of the three basemap types. Comparisons were made across effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction usability metrics. In addition to basemap type, the survey examined how map scale, map complexity, map use tasks, and respondents’ mapping expertise affected map reading abilities. Survey results found that basemap type did not significantly affect map usability for search and search-along-route map use tasks. Larger map scales improved respondents’ map reading effectiveness, and map reading efficiency was significantly faster for respondents with greater mapping expertise. Map complexity and map use tasks had no significant effect on map reading performance. Basemap preference results show that respondents liked street basemaps the most, and canvas basemaps the least. The relationship between respondents’ map reading performance and basemap preferences was also contemplated, with avenues provided for future research.

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  • A new method for scaling harmonic frequencies to match experiment

    Crittenden DL; Sibaev M (2016)

    Conference Contributions - Other
    University of Canterbury Library

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  • The role of the art of living in early childhood education

    Teschers C (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    The notions of well-being and happiness are widely used today in a range of disciplines, areas of research, educational practice and daily life. However, these terms have to be considered critically, and careful reflection on their meaning is needed in each context where they are used (Soutter, Gilmore & O’Steen 2011). One reflection in the context of education has been conducted in relation to positive psychology as well as philosophical concepts and questions such as how to live a good life, the art of living and especially Schmid’s (2000) concept of Lebenskunst or ‘art of living’ (Teschers 2013). Still, the research undertaken to connect these concepts with the area of early childhood education in particular has been rather limited. The current paper is one step to bridge this gap by exploring how the concept of the art of living relates to early childhood education and the notion of well-being as it is used in the New Zealand early childhood curriculum Te Whāriki (Ministry of Education 1996). It is proposed that early childhood educators can support the development of children’s abilities to enable them to engage actively in shaping their own lives and developing their own art of living earlier rather than later in their lives. Further, suggestions are made for teaching practice about ways early childhood educators can support young children to become reflective, autonomous and knowledgeable human beings, who are able to take responsibility for their own lives.

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  • Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life

    D'Olimpio L; Teschers C (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Canterbury Library

    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children (P4C) approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s (2000) philosophical concept of Lebenskunst (the art of living). Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One aspect of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of philosophy through the notions of Bildung, (self-) refection, prudence and practical wisdom, as well as the requirement for each individual to take responsibility for actively shaping their life as an artwork. In this sense, each person is the artist responsible for living their own beautiful life. We argue that there are some useful parallels between Schmid’s concept of the art of living and P4C, such as the ideal of a holistic philosophy that is “lived”. The pragmatic approach of P4C focuses on the embodied learner who practices critical, caring and creative thinking. Both P4C and Schmid’s theory are reminiscent of the Aristotelian notion of practical wisdom (phronesis), which allows for an approach to an education for life that prepares (young) students to develop their own art of living. We also critically discuss tensions arising between these two concepts.

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  • Te Mata Ira—Faces of the Gene: Developing a cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research involving Māori

    Hudson, Maui; Russell, Khyla; Uerata, Lynley; Milne, Moe; Wilcox, Phillip; Port, Ramari Viola; Smith, Barry; Toki, Valmaine; Beaton, Angela (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Te Mata Ira was a three-year research project (2012–2015) that explored Māori views on genomic research and biobanking for the development of culturally appropriate guidelines. A key component of this process has been to identify Māori concepts that provide cultural reference points for engaging with biobanking and genomic research. These cultural cues provide the basis for describing the cultural logic that underpins engagement in this context in a culturally acceptable manner. This paper outlines the role of two wānanga (workshops) conducted as part of the larger project that were used to make sense of the Māori concepts that emerged from other data-collection activities. The wānanga involved six experts who worked with the research team to make sense of the Māori concepts. The wānanga process created the logic behind the cultural foundation for biobanking and genomic research, providing a basis for understanding Māori concepts, Māori ethical principles and their application to biobanking and genomic research.

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  • Geological subsidence and sinking islands: the case of Manono (Samoa)

    Sand, Christophe; Bole, Jacques; Baret, David; Ouetcho, André-John; Petchey, Fiona; Hogg, Alan; Asaua, Tautala (2016)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    W.R. Dickinson, as part of his wide study of the geological history of the Pacific islands, has linked the unique case of the deeply submerged Lapita site of Mulifanua in western Upolu (Samoa) to the slow subsidence of Upolu island. Recent archaeological research on the neighbouring small island of Manono has yielded new and detailed data on this geological process. A series of new dates has allowed us to define the speed of the subsidence and demonstrate the massive environmental changes to which the local population has had to adapt over the past 2000 years.

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  • Maternal Matters: A Narrative Analysis of Mother-Daughter Family Business Dyads

    Kilkolly-Proffit, Michelle (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    The literature on parent-adult child family business dyads is traditionally focused on father-child led firms. These studies are predominantly concentrated on intergenerational transfers in family firms and include both father-son dyads and a growing body of father-daughter literature (cf. Davis, 1982; Davis & Tagiuri, 1989; Dumas, 1990; Hollander & Bukowitz, 1990; Humphreys, 2013). Less visible are mother-son family business dyadic studies (cf. Kaslow, 1998). Higginson???s (2010) recent contribution examining relational factors and knowledge transfer in mother-daughter businesses and Vera and Dean???s (2005) comparative study of succession in father-daughter and mother-daughter led firms are among the very few examining the mother-daughter family business dyad. This study examines four mother-daughter family business dyads who own their firms. Each daughter is also a mother. Using the life story interviewing techniques and tools of Atkinson (1998) and McAdams (2008), and an adapted family history method (Miller, 2000), this research takes an interpretive, narrative approach to examine the key influences shaping these dyads. Firstly, this study identifies key influences and then explains how these have contributed to shaping these family business women, their families and their approaches to their business undertakings. Within-dyad and across-dyad findings across four overarching themes: the influence of family of origin, the influence of created family and motherhood, the influence of mother-daughter relationship and career, business and opportunity journey contribute to shared narratives for both generations. A ???baseline understanding??? (Gross, 1998; Shenton, 2004) informing a baseline typology was derived for the four mother-daughter family business dyads in this study. This was garnered from the shared narratives using axes of business approach: entrepreneurial or small business, income and time. The categorizations that emerged were ???The Lifestylers???, ???The Artisans,??? ???The Growth-Opportunists??? and ???The Dependents.??? This baseline typology or characterization of these four dyads provides a starting point towards further understanding of the mother-daughter phenomenon in future studies. The dearth of studies on mother-child firms indicate that a potentially rich contribution in family business discourse is being largely overlooked. Nelton (1998), Vera and Dean (2005) and Higginson (2010) have called for more research on mother-daughter family business successions. This study, examining two generations of family business women leading their own family firms, contributes to further gendered discourse on the influences shaping mother-daughter family business dyads and goes some way towards answering their call.

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  • Baudrillard in a ‘Post-Truth’World: Groundwork for a Critique of the Rise of Trump

    Nicholls, Brett (2016-12)

    Journal article
    University of Otago

    This paper takes the view that Baudrillard’s work on the West’s fascination with reality is as insightful as ever. The paper traces the rise of this fascination across four areas of his work: the critique of the commodity form, the rise of objective reality, hyperreality, and integral reality. I then argue that Baudrillard provides us with a means for adequately understanding and engaging with the current post-truth scandal. My claim is that the essence of’ ‘Trumpism’ is not to be found in a lack of reality, the notion that there is not enough truth in play; it is to be found in the overproduction of a surplus reality that veers out of control into hitherto unknown forms of absurdity, or, in Baudrillard’s terms, into integral reality.

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  • Guest editorial by Sunita Basnet: Bhutanese refugee women and girls in NZ

    Basnet, Sunita (2016)

    Unclassified
    University of Waikato

    These former Bhutanese refugee women and girls were resettled in Christchurch, Nelson, Palmerston North and Auckland since 2008 under the New Zealand refugee quota. According to the UNHCR Nepal, as of 30th June 2016, 104,009 Bhutanese refugees from Nepal have been resettled in eight countries. New Zealand has resettled 1,009 making New Zealand the fourth largest hosting country. The interviews were conducted in Nepali, then have been translated to English.

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  • Investigation into the assembly of adiponectin as a target for countering obesity related diseases

    Hampe, Lutz (2016)

    Doctoral thesis
    The University of Auckland Library

    Adiponectin, a collagenous hormone secreted abundantly from adipocytes, possesses potent anti-diabetic and anti-inflammatory properties. Mediated by the conserved Cys39 located in the variable region of the N-terminus, the trimeric (low molecular weight (LMW)) adiponectin subunit assembles into different higher order complexes, e.g. hexamers (middle molecular weight (MMW)) and 12-18-mers (high molecular weight (HMW)), the latter being mostly responsible for the insulin-sensitizing activity of adiponectin. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperone ERp44 retains adiponectin in the early secretory compartment and tightly controls the oxidative state of Cys39 and the oligomerization of adiponectin. Biologically active, recombinant and pure adiponectin oligomers are difficult to produce hampering the analyses of the oligomerisation process. To mitigate this production problem, we engineered and synthesized a model peptide of the N-terminal domain of adiponectin. We demonstrated that the peptide could be used for probing the influence of the variable domain on the multimerization of this important circulating hormone as well as the interaction between the adiponectin and ERp44. Using cellular and in vitro assays, we showed that ERp44 specifically recognizes the LMW and MMW forms but not the HMW form. Binding assays with short peptide mimetics and the aforementioned peptide model of the N-terminal domain of adiponectin suggest that ERp44 intercepts and converts the pool of fully oxidized LMW and MMW adiponectin, but not the HMW form, into reduced trimeric precursors. In vivo, these ERp44-bound precursors in the cis-Golgi may be transported back to the ER and released to enhance the population of adiponectin intermediates with appropriate oxidative state for HMW assembly, thereby underpinning the process of ERp44 quality control. Obesity-induced ER stress causes dysregulation of ER chaperone activity in vivo including ERp44 action, resulting in a decreased level of secreted HMW, which is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Using adipocyte cells and genetically obese mice we demonstrated that designed peptide mimetics derived from ERp44 clients can restore dysregulated ERp44 activity and in turn facilitated adiponectin assembly into HMW form and promote adiponectin release from the ER. Therefore, these peptides can act as reagents to counteract impaired adiponectin multimerization caused by dysregulation in ER chaperone activity.

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