82,361 results for All rights reserved

  • Frau Amsel's Cupboard

    Makereti, TRM

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Packed with new essays, poetry and fiction from 42 leading and new New Zealand writers, Sport 42 is a superb overview of current New Zealand writing

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  • New Zealand Psychologists' Use of and Attitudes Towards Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Based Technology in Clinical Practice

    McNaught, AJ; van Kessel, K

    Poster
    Massey University

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  • A genome-wide scan of positive selection signature using Ovine Infinium® HD SNP BeadChip in two Romney lines, selected for resistance or resilience to nematodes

    Yan, J; Dukkipati, VSR; Blair, HT; Biggs, PJ; Hamie, JC; Greer, A

    Poster
    Massey University

    A study was undertaken to identify selection signatures associated with resistance to gastrointestinal nematodiasis in sheep. Ninety-three Romney sheep from two selection lines (resistant or resilient) were genotyped using the Ovine Infinium® HD SNP BeadChip, and extended haplotype homozygosity (EHH) and site-specific extended haplotype homozygosity (EHHS) analyses were undertaken. In total, 224 SNPs (147 in EHH and 77 in EHHS) were found to be significant (p <0.0001). Preliminary exploration of 10 SNPs found them to be located within two previously identified QTLs, namely LATRICH_2 and FECGEN, which were associated with nematode larval count and faecal egg count, respectively.

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  • Kei roto i te whare on housing

    Barnett, CD

    Conference paper
    Massey University

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  • Taiepa Tiketike - supporting Parihaka’s energy transition through a research partnership.

    Curd, J; Murray, PE; Hohaia, T

    Poster
    Massey University

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  • Black Milk

    Makereti, TRM

    Journal article
    Massey University

    In partnership with the Commonwealth Writers, Granta is publishing the regional winners of the 2016 Commonwealth Short Story Prize, beginning with Tina Makereti’s ‘Black Milk’ – the winning entry from the Pacific.

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  • Sharing the Waiwhakaiho

    FitzHerbert, SJ; Richardson, J; Ryan, AM; Mansvelt, J; Gallagher, A

    Artefact
    Massey University

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  • Monster

    Makereti, TRM

    Journal article
    Massey University

    Why look to fiction to take the temperature of a country? You might as well ask the canary to issue a detailed report into working conditions in the coalmine. The task of the writer is to sing her own song, which may be entirely at odds with the atmosphere in which she finds herself. And yet: these three stories alert us to something in the air in Aotearoa New Zealand. The barometer swings, conditions change, and people are buffeted by circumstance, challenged by fresh strangeness. The location of each story is absolutely local – we know where we are – but the threat is diffuse, worldly, universal. As always, it’s an interesting time to be a writer in New Zealand. We are all luminaries now, writing not in the shadow but by the light of Eleanor Catton’s brilliant success, which blazes like a signal fire on the beach. Not a problem, to use the vernacular. We’ve been here before, with Katherine Mansfield’s ‘little lamp’, and we’ll be here again. Engaging the world beyond our shores, tangling with its cultural economies, and then plunging back into the hinterland, the harbour, the bare cupboard, mining our own dark past – and present and future – for literary gold.

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  • The role of defendable space as a key urban design tool for bushfire risk management

    Kornakova, M; March, A

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Changes in climatic conditions around the world associated with anthropogenic climate change have result in increased numbers of extreme weather events. Population growth, migration, urban sprawl and tree change movements are often combined with peoples’ desire to live near beneficial natural assets such as water bodies, elevated slopes or forests. Accordingly, these events are increasingly leading to disasters that cause significant damage to human settlements, injury or loss of life. This is particularly evident in the Australian context, where the increased frequency of extreme weather has led to greater numbers of bushfires. Given that fire will continue to be integral to Australia’s natural landscape, there is an ongoing need to develop tools for managing the risks associated with bushfires.

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  • Learning from Wye River and Separation Creek: Towards Improved Community Bushfire Safety

    March, A; Kornakova, M; Clements, R

    Conference paper
    Massey University

    Safety in human settlements is the result of a complex interplay between the existing physical forms of places, including natural and human made elements, the particular hazards faced, and the capabilities of people and services in the face of potential threats. The Wye River and Separation Creek fires of Christmas Day 2015 represent a disaster in which a small community’s capabilities were overwhelmed by bushfires. The current paper reviews documentation of the fire’s progression and the main factors of its interaction with these settlements. This documentation is then used to pose key directions for improvement and initial lessons learnt regarding the factors impacting upon community safety in the fires, as a key element of adaptive recovery.

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  • Sharing the Waiwhakaiho

    Richardson, JM; Ryan, AM; Mansvelt, J; Gallagher, A; FitzHerbert, S

    Creative work
    Massey University

    ‘Sharing the Waiwhakaiho’ directed by Anand Rose http://www.greencow.co.nz was made as part of a Living Lab project led by Massey University’s School of People, Environment and Planning in collaboration with the following people and organisations, and supported by Massey University’s Strategic Innovation Fund.

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  • An exploration of language acquisition through peer scaffolding and sociocultural interactions in a New Zealand primary school : a thesis in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Second Language Teaching, Massey University, Manawatu, Aotearoa, New Zealand

    Gonzales, Vera Inserto

    Thesis
    Massey University

    In recent years, New Zealand’s continued commitment to accept migrants and refugees from other countries has caused our schools to be impacted by a significant influx of English language learners from many different ethnic backgrounds. As a result, teachers have needed to modify their practices to cater for the needs of increasing numbers of English language learners (ELLs) in mainstream classrooms. This study seeks to identify the influences that sociocultural interactions and peer-scaffolding can have on the language development of young ELLs in primary schools. Utilising a qualitative case-study design and participant observations as the main data collection instrument, this research investigated classroom and playground peer-interactions involving two junior primary ELLs over the course of two school terms. The classroom teachers and parents of the two case students were also interviewed for background information in order to explore their roles as mediators of language acquisition. Findings revealed the significance of interactions between ELLs and their peers during both mainstream classroom and playground activities. The complexity of the communicative exchanges and linguistic strategies utilised by the ELLs with their peers highlighted their ability to develop agency within their social networks and to use both linguistic and non-linguistic tools to effectively engage with these. The ELLs’ second language development was also facilitated by their parents and classroom teachers through mediated interactions that encouraged sociocultural and language development within the school, home, and wider community. Throughout the study, a focus on Vygotsky’s (1978) sociocultural theory and Lave and Wenger’s (1991) community of practice model help to explain the ELLs’ strategies in coping with the linguistic challenges and the sometimes complex pre-existing relational structures within the mainstream educational environment.

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  • He kohinga kōrero ā ngā kaiarataki me ngā kaiako : student supervision : experiences and views of kaiarataki and kaiako at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Philosophy (Health) at Massey University, Manawatū, New Zealand

    Lipsham, Marjorie Jane Hera

    Thesis
    Massey University

    This thesis explores Kaiarataki (placement coordinators) and Kaiako (social work educators) experiences and views about the construction of student supervision for tauira (students) at Te Wānanga o Aotearoa (TWOA). This research focused on the programme, Te Tohu Paetahi ngā Poutoko Whakarara Oranga, the Bachelor of Social Work (Biculturalism in Practice). The supervision of students during Te Mahi Whakatau (Practice Based Learning) is the focus of this thesis. Te Mahi Whakatau (PBL) is the practice/practicum component of the student’s degree and is a central part of their learning. The goal of this thesis is to investigate the construction of placement at TWOA and strengthen the mauri ora or the wellbeing of the programme, TWOA, tauira and staff which will contribute positively to social work and its stakeholders. A Kaupapa Māori approach and my own Mātauranga ā Whānau formed the methodology. Hui was used to gather data in line with the methodology and three key themes were identified from the findings: The insufficient preparation of tauira, biculturalism – perpetuating the status quo, and relationships. The insufficient preparation of students for placement is highlighted in the findings and literature review for this thesis and this shows that there is a cycle of unpreparedness that affects the student supervisory context, from the teaching and assessment of supervision, to the supervisors and the field educators. The findings highlight the need to strengthen the teaching at TWOA in terms of student supervision, who delivers that teaching and when and what will be delivered. The incorporation of bicultural supervision for tauira whilst on Te Mahi Whakatau (PBL) needs further developing also through the incorporation of training, support, curriculum and policy development. Further research recommendations include the need to investigate relationships between the kaiarataki and other stakeholders of Te Mahi Whakatau (PBL) and how takepū (applied principles) is experienced in relationships within Te Mahi Whakatau (PBL).

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  • A Foucaultian discourse analysis of educational 'underachievement' : psychology's run away concept : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts in Psychology at Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand

    Eggleton, Tamsin

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Underachievement is a dominant feature in educational discourse; it is often framed as a ‘crisis’ affecting different social groups, or even whole countries. A particularly common depiction of underachievement is that of a ‘gap’ affecting ethnic minority and working class groups. Nearly 60 years of research, reform and policy attempts to address this ‘gap’ have made little progress in lifting achievement levels. This paper uses a Foucaultian discourse analysis method to encourage a reformulation of underachievement discourse, particularly as it relates to minority ethnic students. A genealogy of the conditions of possibility which gave rise to underachievement reveals this concept and its related assumptions and processes (such as testing) to be part of a broader system of power relations which structure education in favour of dominant cultural and economic needs. The discipline of psychology has been instrumental in providing a supposed scientific basis to the dominant educational values of scientific management, efficiency and neoliberalism. This thesis posits that underachievement is a socially located concept which is able to exist and shape social realities due to its convenience to dominant educational and cultural practices. In revealing the social nature of psychological knowledge on underachievement, psychology’s claims of the possibility of objective social knowledge under post-positivistic, empirical methods are also brought into question. Keywords: Underachievement, Foucault, Discourse Analysis, Genealogy, Psychology, Education

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  • The design and implementation of a structured programming language with few arbitrary syntactic restrictions : the interpretive phase : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Computer Science at Massey University

    Gibbons, Peter Blundell

    Thesis
    Massey University

    The first and most important question that must be answered is, "Why in fact do we need a new programming language?". In order to answer this, we must really go back and try to answer the question, "What is programming?". In designing MUSSEL, we have been very much influenced by the ideas of E.W. Dijkstra [35] and N. Wirth [7], [8], and [34]. Wirth, in particular, provides some strong criticism of present day programming courses, and in doing so, formulates some well-reasoned and constructive answers to the question, "What is programming?", or rather, "What should a programming course be?". His views, in fact, are representative of a growing dissatisfaction among many Computer Scientists with the conventional methods being taught to students as an aid to writing programs.

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  • The cognitive construction of programs by novice programmers : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Computer Science at Massey University

    Rose, Zoë Joanne

    Thesis
    Massey University

    Human memory and cognition are studied to aid novice programmers with the cognitive construction and the acquisition of program plans. Particular emphasis is placed on the storage and retrieval of program knowledge, the cognitive structure of stored program knowledge, the effects of transferring cognitive structures from one programming language to another, and the learning activities involved with learning a new programming language. Cognitive principles are applied to the design of a programming language and environment. The design of both the programming language and environment are discussed together with an introduction of how they are used. The hypothetical results of two experiments are argued to demonstrate that the programming language and environment are well suited in supporting the development of program plans.

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  • Comparative study in the net barter terms of trade and income terms of trade of the Pacific Island economies : a thesis presented in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Business Studies in Economics at Massey University

    Soakai, Robert Matafonua Fotu

    Thesis
    Massey University

    It is suggested by the so-called P-S thesis that countries whose exports based upon traditional primary products will continue to face deterioration in their terms of trade. It is upon such a proclamation, that challenge the author to launched an investigation to the validity of such a claim and its applicability to the case of Solomon Islands, Tonga and Western Samoa. The early researcher in this area shows that countries whose exports dominate by exporting traditional primary commodities tend to have more instability in its terms of trade than those who are exporting manufactured goods. However one of the most staggering finding of this research is. The terms trade of the three island economies seem to be deteriorate, at same time their purchasing power seems to be on the positive side. What it means that, despite the deterioration in the country's terms of trade their incomes seem not deter at all by such a movement. This is sound controversial to the P-S thesis but there was other trade incentive that came in to play when these countries' terms of trade deteriorate. However, perhaps it is enough to mention here that such deterioration in the terms of trade might mean so little when one take into account major factors that hammered these small island's economies. Factors like, drought, hurricane, poor quarantine service, has fueled the problem of deterioration of the terms of trade. Empirical test was carried out to examine the impact of the Net Barter terms of trade movement on the income (Gross Domestic Products). Result revealed was un-intrigue. Conclusion was drawn and there is a strong need for change in the export haves of the three island economies. Policies need to change to encourage regional trading. A change to the trade agreement (e.g., SPARTECA) that govern the trade activities of the island nations, is necessary. Such a change will help the island nations to compete with its trading partners effectively and competatively.

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  • Temporal dynamics of microbial communities in geothermal hotsprings of the Taupo Volcanic Zone

    Lowe, Caitlin Louise (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Few studies of microbial biogeography address temporal variability in physicochemical conditions and communities in geothermal environments. Here we examine the temporal variability of 43 chemical analytes, temperature and pH in association with microbial community composition of 69 water samples collected bimonthly from 12 hotsprings of the Taupo Volcanic Zone between December 2015 and October 2016. Communities and physicochemical parameters were characterized using a combination of next generation Ion Torrent sequencing (16S rRNA), UV-spectrometry, ICP-MS, FIA and gas chromatography. Using correlation association tests, significant physicochemical changes (P<0.05) were correlated with temporal variations in microbial community composition in six of the target hotsprings. Of these six hotsprings, temperature and pH were the most influential variables associated with community changes and commonly covaried with the Aquificae, Deinococcus-Thermus and Proteobacteria at four sites. Downstream effects of rainfall using rainfall and geothermal bore water datasets could be linked with physicochemical and microbial community changes during the winter months at two of these sites. This study contributes to our understanding of geothermal microbial dynamics in stable and variable geothermal environme nts, and highlights that geothermal hotsprings are not isolated from their surrounding environment.

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  • Tendency toward negative correlations for positively-skewed independent random variables

    Bardsley, W. Earl (2014)

    Journal article
    University of Waikato

    Hydrological variables often display positive skewness, with means exceeding medians. Even when two such variables are independent, there is a more than 50% chance that a bivariate random sample will yield a negative value of the Pearson product-moment linear correlation coefficient r. Simulations from inverse Gaussian distributions suggest that this effect is small and unlikely to have any effect on significance tests of r if two skewed variables are in fact independent. However, a high frequency of negative sample correlations in a multi-site hydrological study could result in an incorrect deduction that some weak but widespread physical process is in operation.

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  • Effects of Drying Conditions on Protein Properties of Blood meal

    Damba, Chawangwa (2017)

    Masters thesis
    University of Waikato

    Blood meal is a by-product of the meat industry produced through drying of animal blood. It contains about 85 wt.% proteins. Drying has been used as a method to preserve biomaterials and involves lowering of the water activity of biomaterials. The purpose of this research was to study the drying kinetics of producing blood meal in an oven dryer, to evaluate suitable drying models for describing the drying process and to determine the effects of drying conditions on the physio-chemical properties of blood meal. Moisture content and drying rates were determined by drying coagulated blood at different temperatures (60 °C, 100 °C and 140 °C) for a constant period of 24 hours. The initial moisture content of coagulated blood was about 60.7 wt% on a wet basis. A drying temperature of 140 °C was found to be the optimal for routine moisture determination for coagulated blood as equilibrium moisture was achieved within 24 hours period. A constant drying rate period was not observed in any of the conditions tested, and the initial increasing rate period as followed by a short transition phase prior to the falling-rate period. Thus, moisture removal from the coagulated blood was governed by a diffusion-controlled process. The experimental drying data for coagulated blood was used to fit the Lewis, Page, Modified Page, Logarithmic and Henderson and Pabis models and the statistical validity of models tested were determined by non-linear regression analysis. The Page model had the highest R² (0.9999) and lowest χ² (0.0001) and RMSE values. This indicated that Page model adequately described the oven drying behaviour of coagulated blood. Blood meal samples were produced by drying coagulated blood at different temperatures (60 °C, 100 °C, 140 °C) to varying moisture contents (5 %, 10 % and 15 %). A drop penetration test using water and/or sodium dodecyl sulphate dissolved in water were used to determine the wettability of the samples produce while thermal analysis techniques such as Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) were used to investigate the thermal properties of bloodmeal. X-ray scattering was used to investigate conformational changes in blood meal proteins during drying. Drying conditions had substantial effects on both physicochemical and thermal properties of blood meal. It was established that drying temperature had a more significant effect on the wettability of blood meal than the final moisture content. However, the final moisture content had larger contribution to the thermal stability of blood meal than drying temperature. Blood meal produced at 60 °C to 15% moisture content was the most stable sample while blood meal produced at 140 °C to 10% moisture content was the least stable. Protein denaturation was observed at 92 °C to 122 °C, depending on moisture content and drying temperature. DMA results revealed that different relaxations occurred when drying coagulated blood. A dry glass transition temperature for samples was observed between 219 °C - 226.8 °C. This suggested that bound water does not act as plasticiser in blood meal. Glass transitions observed in DSC were therefore, considered more accurate and reliable for blood meal samples containing moisture. Drying of coagulated blood was observed to have drastic effect on the structural arrangement of coagulated blood in XRD. Increase in moisture content was observed to have an effect on the β-sheets structure of samples dried at 60 °C and 100 °C. Since bloodmeal produced at 60 °C and 100 °C did not show complete denaturation of proteins, future thermoplastic processing should consider blood meal produced within this temperature range for improved properties.

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